Textbook Notes (367,917)
Canada (161,498)
Psychology (1,468)
PSYCH 1XX3 (384)
Joe Kim (357)
Chapter

Colour and Depth Perception

7 Pages
46 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 1XX3
Professor
Joe Kim
Semester
Winter

Description
Psycholgy 1XX3 Colour and Depth Perception • The perception of colour allows us to distinguish features of objects when borders or  contours do not • The processing of colour begins right in the retina where three cone types respond  maximally to three different wavelengths of light: red, green and blue  • 3 cones▯trichromatic • there is a sophisticated abstracting process that occurs which allows us to see colour • Colour is a constant property of an object • The object’s surface absorbs some wavelengths and reflects others • The wavelength of the reflected light determines what colour the object is • The colour is not only determined by reflectance but also the composition of the  illuminating light • The property of objects appearing the same colour in all different lights is called colour  constancy Variations of Colour Vision • Humans are trichromats along with bees and macaque monkeys • Bees see ultraviolet light though • Some are dichromats (most animals)­black and white • Some are monochromats (rely on brightness) • Others have 4 receptors! (better than us!!) Colour Mixing • We can combine colours by mixing lights (additive) or by mixing pigments (subtractive) • Additive: the process of overlapping red, blue and green lights together • Subtractive: occurs by combining pigments of some colours together such as paints or ink o Pigments reflect some wavelengths but absorb all others o If all three colours are mixed together—each is absorbed—or subtracted and  results in the colour black Theories of Colour Vision • The combination of all three primary colours (blue red and green) is perceived as white • Thomas Young: we have 3 receptors which respond to different colours of light • Hermann von Hemholtz: receptors sensitive to red (long), green (medium) and blue  (short) wavelengths of light Herring▯afterimage: visual illusion (cannot be explained by trichromatic theory) • When 2 colours are side by side—they interact—and your perception of them changes:  called: simultaneous contrast (cannot be explained by trichromatic theory) •  Combinations of red, green and blue can usually describe our perception of colour • opponent process theory: Our perception of colour relies on three mutually antagonistic  mechanisms that process the information received by cones and recode them into a signal  in relation to pairs of colours. These form different colour channels • these opponent channels would respond in opposing directions to pairs of colours • one set of neurons encodes black­white differences, corresponding to intensity or  luminance differences in the field • another set of neurons responds to the red/green and another to yellow/blue differences In the retina • we think of these channels with the perspective of the retinal ganglion cell receptive field  organization o red/green cell would increase its activity as a result of stimulation with red light  and decrease in response to green light—Red= +red­green—green=­red+green o a blue­yellow cell would signal +b­y  although there is no “yellow” cone, yellow channels are made up from the  response properties of both medium(green) and long (red) wavelength  sensitive cones The trichromatic theory helps us to understand the functioning of cones in the retina The opponent process theory helps us to understand the processing of colour from later stages  of the visual processing, such as the output of the retinal ganglion cells and colour processing in  the LGN  Colour Processing IN THE RETINA • 2 processing channels stream information to higher visual centers • the low resolution channels receive input from M­type ganglion cells that tend to have  larger receptive fields, are achromatic and convey information about contrast and  movement • high resolution channels rexeive input from p­type ganglion cells that tend to have  smaller receptive fields capable of conveying colour information as well as fine detail • p­type ganglion cells constitute about 80% of all ganglion cells retina • 2 subtypes are defined by the organization of cone inputs o the red­green opponent type receives input only from long and medium  wavelength sensitive cones, whereas the yellow­blue type receives input from all  3 classes of cones • the special organization of the p cell’s receptive field and the different cone types allow  p­type ganglion cells to convey both detail and colour information in a complex signal • a p cell responds well to brightness variations in the fine structure of an image as shown  by a spot of light presented to the center or surround AND it responds well to colour  variation in the coarse structure of the image as shown by spots of light presented over  the entire centre and surround In the LGN • the information provided from the p­type retinal ganglion cell is sent to the parvocellular  layers in the LGN • most parvocellular cells appear to respond to colour and have a center—surround  receptive field organization, just like the retina In the Primary Visual Cortex • the response to colour is more complex in primary visual cortex than in the retina and the  LGN • when primary visual cortex is stained for an enzyme that is a marker of metabolically  active areas, distinct “blobs” appear in layer 2 of primary visual cortex • blobs are organized in a regular fashion o middle of ocular dominance columns • the code the brain uses to convey information about colour is charged in the primary  visual cortex • “blobs” are regions that have a high concentration of “special colour cells” in primary  visual cortex • cells within each CO blob are sensitive to colour and low frequency spatial information Beyond Primary Visual Cortex • blobs are thought to be the colour area in the visual cortex and their output is to a distinct  anatomical region of V2 called the “thin­stripes” •  blobs in V1 project information to the thin stripes of V2, which in turn sends information  to V4. • Some cells in area V4 respond in a way that does correlate with our perception of colour Colour Blindness • Colour blindness is a term used to describe the lack of sensitivity to certain colours and is  the result of a partial or complete loss of function to one or more of the different cone  systems Protonopia: refers to the loss of the long wavelength sensitive cone Deuteranopia: the loss of the medium sensitive cone Tritanopia: the loss of the short wavelength
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 1XX3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit