Textbook Notes (367,754)
Canada (161,370)
Psychology (1,468)
PSYCH 3BA3 (49)
Chapter 8

Chapter 8.docx

4 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3BA3
Professor
Richard B Day
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 8: Seeing Our Futures Through Self­Efficacy, Optimism, and Hope Pgs. 175­200 • In the Seligman theory of learned optimism, the optimist uses adaptive causal  attributions to explain negative experiences or events • The optimist explains bad things in such a manner as (1) to account for the role of  other people and environments in producing bad outcomes, (2) to interpret the bad  event as not likely to happen again, and (3) to constrain the bad outcome to just  one performance area and not others • I.e. the optimistic student who received a poor grade in a high school class would  say, (1) “It was a poorly worded exam”(external attribution), (2) “I have done  better on previous exams” (variable attribution), and (3) “I am doing better in  other areas of my life such as my relationships and sports achievements” (specific  attribution) • Seligman’s theory implicitly places great emphasis upon negative outcomes in  determining one’s attributional explanations • The theory uses an excuse­like process of “distancing” from bad things that have  happened in the past, rather than the more usual notion of optimism involving the  connection to positive outcomes desired in the future • There appears to be some genetic component of explanatory style, and learned  optimism appears to have roots in the environment • Parents who provide safe, coherent environments are more likely to promote the  learned optimism style in their offspring • The parents of optimists are portrayed as modeling optimism for their children by  making explanations for negative events that enable the offspring to continue to  feel good about themselves, along with explanations for positive events that help  the offspring feel extra­good about themselves • Children who grow up with learned optimism are characterized as having had  parents who understood their failures and generally attributed those failures to  external rather than internal factors • Pessimistic people had parents who were pessimistic; experiencing childhood  traumas can yield pessimism, and parental divorce may also undermine learned  optimism • Greater amounts of television watched at age 4 were related significantly to  higher subsequent likelihoods of those children becoming bullies • A steady diet of television violence can predispose and reinforce a helpless  explanatory style that is associated with low learned optimism in children • Pessimism and depression are related to abnormal limbic system functioning as  well as to dysfunctional operations of the lateral prefrontal cortex and the  paralimbic system • Depression appears to be linked to deficiencies in neurotransmitters; also  associated with depleted endorphin secretion and defective immune functioning • The instrument used to measure attributional style in adults is called the  Attributional Style Questionnaire; the instrument for children is the Children’s  Attributional Style Questionnaire • The ASQ poses either a positive or a negative life event, and respondents are  asked to indicate what they believe to be the casual explanations of those events  on the dimensions of internal/external, stable/transient, and global/specific • The Content Analysis of Verbal Explanation (CAVE) has been developed to  derive ratings of optimism and pessimism from written or spoken words; allows  an unobtrusive means of rating a person’s explanatory style based on language  usage • Learned optimism is associated with: better academic performances, superior,  athletic performances, more productive work records, greater satisfaction in  interpersonal relationships, more effective coping with life stressors, less  vulnerability to depression, and superior physical health • New definition of optimism­ the stable tendency “to believe that good rather than  bad things will happen” • The Life Orientation Test (LOT), included positive and negative expectancies;  overlapped with neuroticism • In response to this concern, the LOT­R was created to eliminate neuroticism  overlap concerns • High scorers on the LOT­R have related to better recovery in coronary bypass  surgery, dealing more effectively with AIDS, enduring cancer biopsies more  easily, better adjustment to pregnancy, and continuing in treatment for alcohol  abuse • When coping with stressors, optimists appear to take a problem­solving approach  and are more planful than pessimists • Optimists tend to use the approach­oriented coping strategies of positive  reframing and seeing the best in situations, whereas pessimists are more  avoidance and use denial tactics • Optimists appraise daily stresses in terms of potential growth and tension  reduction more than their pessimistic counterparts do • When faced with truly uncontrollable circumstances, optimists tend to accept their  plights, whereas pessimists actively deny their problems and tend to make them  worse • Optimists, as compared to pessimists fare better in the following ways: starting  college, performing in work situations, enduring a missile attack, caring for  Alzheimer’s patients, undergoing coronary bypass surgeries, coping with cancer,  and coping in general • Some studies have found that optimism may be related to the suppression of the  immune system in some cases • Most cognitive therapy techniques aim to lessen negative thinking, but do little to  enhance positive thinking; the simple decrease in negative thinking does not  change positive thinking • Hope­ goal­oriented thinking in which the pe
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3BA3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit