Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Psychology (1,468)
PSYCH 3UU3 (13)
Chapter 1

CHAPTER 1 – THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE.docx

8 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCH 3UU3
Professor
Karin R Humphreys
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER 1 – THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE Necessary Biological Hardware for Communication ­ Articulatory apparatus ­ Brain ­ Language ­ Be aware of the social setting in which we produce and understand language Crystal’s List of Eight Functions of Language 1. Primary purpose of language is to communicate 2. Express emotions 3. Social interaction 4. Make use of its sounds 5. Attempt to control the environment 6. To record facts 7. To think with 8. And to express identity Areas of Study in Language ­ Anatomy: emphasizes components of the articulatory tract ­ Neuropsychology: role of different parts of the brain on behaviour ­ Linguistics: examines language itself ­ Psycholinguistics: study of the psychological processes involved in language What is Language? ­ Semantics: the study of meaning ­ Syntax: the rules of word order of a language ­ Morphology: the study of how words are built up from morphemes ­ Pragmatics: the aspects of meaning that do not affect the literal truth of what is  being said; these concern things such as choice from words with the same  meaning, implications in conversation, and maintaining coherence in conversation ­ Phonetics: the acoustic detail of speech sounds and how they are articulated ­ Phonology: the study of sounds and how they relate to languages; phonology  describes the sound categories of each language uses to divide up the space of  possible sound ­ Morphemes: the smallest unit of meaning ­ Inflectional morphology: the study of inflections ­ Derivational morphology: the study of derivational inflections ­ There are two sorts of inflection, regular forms that follow some rule, and  irregular forms that do not ­ Crystal definition of a word: the smallest unit of grammar that can stand on its  own as a complete utterance, separated with spaces in a written language ­ At the lowest level language is made up of sounds that combine together to form  syllables ­ Psychologists believe that we store representations of words in a mental  dictionary, the lexicon, that contains all the information that we know about a  word including its sounds, meaning, written appearance, and the syntactic roles  the word can adopt How Has Language Changed Over Time? ­ Many different languages in the world ­ We can gather where the speakers ancestral language came from by looking at  words that are shared in the descendent language ­ Most languages of Europe and west Asia derive from a common source called  proto­Indo­European • Romance: French, Italian and Spanish • Germanic: German, English and Dutch • Indian ­ Uralic: Finno­Ugric ­ Afro­Asiatic: Niger­Congo, Japanese, Sino­Tibetan, Pacific and South America What is Language For? ­ Language is used for communication ­ Language is a social activity, and is a form of joint action where people  collaborate to achieve a common aim ­ Language might have come to play a role in other, originally non­linguistic,  cognitive processes Brief History of Psycholinguistics ­ 1951/1954 ­ Psycholinguistics = psychology + language ­ Chomsky’s approach: linguistics is the study of language itself, the rules that  describe it, and our knowledge about the rules of language ­ Comparative linguistics was concerned with comparing and tracing the origins of  different languages ­ Structuralism: a primary goal of linguistics was taken to be providing an analysis  of the appropriate categories of description of the units of language ­ Modern linguistics: what is or is not an acceptable sentence ­ Information theory: • Role of probability and redundancy in language, and developed out of the  demands of the fledging telecommunications industry • Working out what was the most likely continuation of a sentence from a  particular point onwards • Influenced the development of cognitive psychology ­ Behaviourism • Relation between an input and output, and how conditioning and  reinforcement formed these associations • Only valid subject matter was behaviour, and language was behaviour • However, Chomsky shoed that behaviourism was incapable of dealing  with natural language and argued for transformational grammar ­ Transformational grammar: • Provided both an account of the underlying structure of language and also  of people’s knowledge of their language ­ Cognitive psychology • Information processing approaches to cognition view the mind as a  computer • Flow diagrams illustrate levels of processing, and attempted to show hoe  one level of representation of language is transformed into another • Boxology ­ Psycholinguistics is an experimental science and measuring reaction times is  particularly important ­ Cognitive science approach: • Includes adult and developmental psychology, philosophy, linguistics,  anthropology, neuroscience and artificial intelligence ­ Artificial intelligence: • Computer modeling of human behaviour emphasizing rules, plans, and  goals • Advantage that you have to be explicit about everything • Disadvantage: because modelers have to be explicit about everything, they  often have to make assumptions, and simplify the context of the model to  a degree where its usefulness becomes debatable • ELIZA:  Used matching sentences to pre­stored templates, produced pre­ determined responses to keywords, and repeated what was input  back with appropriate changes in word order  Did not copute the underlying syntactic structure of sentences • SHRDLU:  Answered questions about an imaginary world called blocksworld  Able to understand sentences but could only understand in as much  as it could give appropriate response to instructions  Worked only for simple, limited domains  Knowledge was limited to the role of blocks within blocksworld • ELIZA and SHRDLU demonstrated the enormity of the task in  understanding language and revealed the main problems to be solved  before computes can understand language • The roles that context and word knowledge are very important • AI has had an influence on how we understand syntax and how we make  inferences in story comprehension ­ Connectionism • Connectionist networks involved interconnected neuron­like units working  together without an explicit governing plan • Rules and behaviour emerge from the interactions between these units ­ Activation is a continuously varying quantity, and can be thought of as a property  rather like heat. Activation can spread from one unit or word or point in a network  to another Methods of Modern Psycholinguistics ­ Traditional psychology experiments (reaction times) ­ Priming: if two things are similar and involved together in processing, they will  assist or interfere with each other • Semantic priming: easier to recognize a word if you have seen a word  related in meaning • Facilitation: processing is sped up • Inhibition: processing is slowed down Lesion Studies ­ Concerned with which parts of the brain control different sorts of behaviour and  working out how complex behaviours map onto the flow of information through  brain structures ­ Double dissociation: different processes underlie each task and lesions may be  present in patients who can perform one task both not another as oppose to  another patient ­ Apparent double dissociations can emerge in complex, distributed, single­route  systems ­ However, the categories of disorders are not always clearly recognizable in the  clinical setting, there is often overlap between patients, with the more pure cases  usually associated with smaller amounts of brain damage, and things are usually  not a fixed state as a result of brain damage as some recovery of function may  occur Wernicke­Geshwind Model ­ Language processes flow from the back of the left hemisphere to the front, with  high­level planning and semantic processes in Wenicke’s area and low­level  sound retrieval and articulation in Broca’s area connected by the arcuate fasciulus Cognitive Neuropsychology vs. Traditional Neuropsychology ­ Theoretical advance in relating neuropsychological disorders to cognitive models ­ Methodological advance in emphasizing the importance of single­case studies,  rather than group studies ­ Contributed a research program, in that it emphasizes how models of normal  processing can be formed by studying brain­damaged behaviour Ultra­Cognitive Neuropsychology ­ Extreme position ­ Gone too far in arguing that group studies cannot provide any information  appropriate for constructin
More Less

Related notes for PSYCH 3UU3

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit