VISD 2B09 Chapter Notes - Chapter 3.1 : Raised Fist, David Lubin, George Orwell

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Wandy Cheng- Chapter 4
Graphic Design: A New History
David Lubin- Losing Sight: War, Authority, and Blindness in British
and American Visual Cultures, 1914- 1922
- Josef Stalin’s moustache was notoriously large as Hitler was tiny
- The moustache was an ideal and became a symbol of national virility
- George Orwell turned the chauvinistic militarism he had when he was
younger to insidious government intrusions
- American and British recruitment posters excite fantasies of mastery
and fear of emasculation
- War requires the acts of blinding of the enemy and oneself
- Kitchener su*ered from wandering eyes
Alfred Leetee’s Kitchener
- Represents strength, authority and focus
oCoveyed by its scowling gaze, clenched /st, enlarged moustache
oClenched /st and foreshortened index /nger perforates the
pictorial space
oFeminist scholar Melissa Hall analysed the authoritarian nature of
the poster
“YOU” captures the viewers as a speci/c subject of address
Consequently subjected to its message
Simple and direct, exactly what the Great Britain intended
to project
oOne of the /rst mass- produced advertisement to sell a product
(enlistment in this case)
oFreudian’s perspective
Stirs in the viewers emotions of anxiety, guilt, and fear of
castration
Takes on an interesting relationship to the theme of
masculinity
“No physical injury is so much dreaded by men than an
injury to the eye”
oPoster focuses on certain parts (face, foreshortened arm, pointed
/ngers) just as if a person is staring into the mirror
- Trust of strangers to lock eyes in an intimate exchange became widely
appropriated after this poster
James Montgomery Flagg’s I Want YOU for US Army
- Painted Uncle Sam for an Independence Day edition
- Made himself up as the old Yankee /gure of Uncle Sam
- Flagg donated the copyright to the government to print more than four
million copies of the colour lithograph
oEssentially the most famous poster of the world at that time
oReused in Second World War
- Vigilante derives from Latin word vigilare, meaning to watch
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