Textbook Notes (368,389)
Canada (161,858)
Commerce (596)
COMM 104 (45)
Sean Field (10)
Chapter

Week 1+2.docx

6 Pages
41 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMM 104
Professor
Sean Field
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 1: what is business ethics and why study it? • Milton Friedman said that the only social responsibility is to make a profit • Stakeholders affected by business are becoming more aware and demanding fair  treatment • Ethics: the application of, or acting within moral principals • Amoral: no consideration of ethical obligations in decision • Immoral: intending to do harm for one’s own benefit • CSR examples of child labour, garment manufacturing (p.8) • Pyramid of social responsibilities: economic responsibilities (be profitable), legal  responsibilities (obey law), ethical responsibilities, philanthropic responsibilities  (give back) Chapter 3: critical thinking for business ethics • Mistaken ethical beliefs can be rooted either in faulty premises or faulty logic • Strong ethical argument must have plausible and relevant premises that provide  sufficient support for the conclusion (p.30) Fallacies: • Straw man: argument where the arguer criticizes a weakened or distorted  version of his opponent’s point of view • Ad hominem (“appeal to person”): argument that focuses on criticizing a  person rather than focusing on the strength of their reasoning – common in  debates • Argument from tradition: should do something just because we have done  it in the past • Argument from popularity: should believe or do something because it is  popular • False dilemma: argument that tries to convince there are only 2 options  when not the case Cognitive Biases: • The framing effect: the way a question is described influences answer • Confirmation bias: natural tendency to seek and remember info that  confirms our prior points of view and avoid or forget info that might  change mind • False consensus effect: tendency to overestimate the extent to which  other’s agree with our points of view • Ingroup bias: tendency to trust and give preference to members of one’s  own group • Moral luck: tendency to attribute moral credit and blame to individuals as  a result of events that are not within their control • Combatting cognitive bias Class 2 • Charter theory of a corporation vs. Modern theory of a corporation • Difference between corporation and citizen (habeas corpus­ corporations have a  subject but no object/body) • Risk of investment culture where shareholders are delinked from corporation th • Modern theory distinguished from the charter theory by the rights (14   amendment), the beurocratization of the process, and delinking of the  shareholders from the core of the business  • CSR has come about recently and has expanded the number of stakeholders  (expanded to environment, the community, etc.) • Value comes from people (labour) and from biophysical environment (supplies) • Exchange value is the basis of price Chapter 2: Theories of ethics • Determining what is ethical/right requires concern for others and the use of logic  over instinct • Study of ethics seeks integrated and justifiable reasons for knowing the right  action • Theories of ethics have shifted from religious authority to a secular approach as  the times have changed • Normative approach to theory: exploration of what ought to be/what one should  do, not an evaluation of what is actually happening Teleological Theory • Suggests each thing in the world has some purpose, and what is right is what leads  to that ultimate purpose – therefore must first define what the proper purpose of  the thing is before determining the proper action/instrumental action that will lead  to its fulfillment • Utilitarianism is one of the most widely applied teleological theories – desired  moral outcome is utility: the maximization of human well­being and the absence  of pain • Consequentialism: the rightness of an action is determined by its  consequences • Hedonism: utility is the pursuit of well­being and the absence of pain or harm • Maximalism: the focus is on the greatest amount of well­being for the  greatest number of people • Universalism: everyone’s happiness must be considered and one’s own  interests cannot count for more than those of others • Act utilitarians require one to consider each of the above four characteristics  for the particular situation being faced • Rule utilitarians ask what the outcome would be in similar situations and  make decisions based on a set of principals founded more generally on  utilitarian morality • Shortcomings of theory ~ Possibility of harming a minority of individuals for  the “greater good”. Impossible to eliminate all harm. How do you categorize  and measure well­being/happiness? The critical mass – how many individuals  comprise the “greater good”? Actions are deemed ethical if they are  instrumental to the acceptable outcome, but what if the actions are  intrinsically wrong? Deontological Theory • The act itself must be intrinsically moral to be right, regardless of the  consequences – doing something because it is the “right thing to do” • Kantian ethics  • German philosopher Kant wrote the ultimate object for humans is Good  Will. Uses term maxim to describe the principal on which a decision is made  (ex. The moral maxim of honesty means one should tell the truth in every  situation) • Hypothetical imperative: if one wants x, they should do y. (only  permissible for non­ethical decisions) • Categorical imperative: one must obey all in all moral questions  regardless of any other variable, i.e. one must do y.   • Universality requires the maxim to be considered in every situation/the  decision maker to evaluate whether that action could be a universal law • The ultimate human dignity of every individual must always be  respected/cannot use an individual purely as means to one’s own end • Criticisms ~ Inflexibility of Kantian moral theory can make it difficult to  apply in ambiguous or complex situations. Categorical imperative that  disregards consequences might not provide right answer in practice when there  on conflicting duties in a complex situation. Social Contract Theory • Individuals consent to the terms of social order and to sacrifice some individual  freedoms in exchange for the functioning/mutual benefit of society • Institutions of society be designed to safeguard equal liberties and opportunities  for individuals • Original position: a “state of nature” prior to the existence of institutions where  Rawl’s believes individuals have no knowledge of their personal situations or  dispositions and are behind a veil of ignorance concerning their own  circumstances • Rawls says rational people would agree on two fundamental principals of justice: • Each person should have a maximum basic liberties to the extent they do  not impede on the liberties of others • Inequalities are permitted in social and economic spheres but they must be  justified either by (1) the inequality is to the benefit of the least well off  (
More Less

Related notes for COMM 104

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit