Textbook Notes (369,035)
Canada (162,359)
Commerce (596)
COMM 104 (45)
Chapter 2

Chapter 2.docx

3 Pages
78 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Commerce
Course
COMM 104
Professor
Karen Humphreys Blake
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 2­ Theories of Ethics: An Introduction for Business Structure • A theory is a system of thought that includes linked principles that seek to  explain, guide, and/or predict action or results  • An ethical theory includes a coherent conception of a morality and a way of  thinking about what is right • The purpose of a theory of ethics is to establish and justify the content of moral  life, and to provide principles or guidelines about how to behave morally • Determining what is right: o Requires concern for others  o Appeals to logic rather than instinct (otherwise ‘what is right’ would be  doing anything we desire) o Seeks integrated and justifiable reasons for knowing the right action • Theories of ethics have become secular: related to the natural world (versus being  connected to religion) • Normative Approach to Theory: an exploration of what ought to be, and what one  should do, rather than an evaluation or description of what is actually happening  in this society or any other o Applies to the teleological, deontological, and social contract theories Teleological Theory (aka Consequentialism) • Telos = purpose (Greek)  • This theory suggests that each thing in the world has some purpose, and what is  right is what leads to that ultimate purpose. Thus, the right act is what achieves  the desired outcome  • Utilitarianism: one of the best known teleological theory o The maximization of human well being and the absence of pain (where  pain is defined as the opposite of happiness) is utility which is the desired  moral outcome o Roots associated with Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill • Contemporary Utilitarianism: evolved language so the focus is human well­being,  but the foundation remains the same. John Boatright summarizes four main  characteristics: 1. Consequentialism: the rightness of an action is determined by its  consequences 2. Hedonism: utility is the pursuit of well­being and the absence of pain or  harm  3. Maximalism: the focus is on the greatest amount of well­being for the  greatest number of people  4. Universalism: everyone’s happiness must be considered and one’s own  interests cannot count for more than those of others • Shortcoming of Utilitarianism: o Allows for the possibility of harming one, or a minority, of individuals for  the greater well being  o It’s impossible to calculate all possible harm from every individual action  o There is the problem of being able to categorize and measure well being or  happiness  o It is unclear how many individuals comprise the “greater good”  o It could be used to justify any actions that lead to an acceptable outcome  Deontological Theory: • Deos= duty or obligation (Greek) • One’s moral duties or obligations determine right actions in every circumstance,  regardless of the consequences One must do something be it is the right thing to  do. • Kantian Ethics: Immanuel Kant is the most widely cited deontologist o His moral philosophy is based on his conception of good will
More Less

Related notes for COMM 104

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit