COMM 251 Chapter Notes - Chapter 0: Social Proof, African-American Culture, Corporate Social Responsibility

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9 Aug 2016
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Liking – Feb 24th
Reading: Competent Jerks, Lovable Fools…
Usually people opt for liability > ability (“lovable fool” over the “competent jerk”)
oPeople deny this fact, even though it is often true
oBecause it looks unprofessional to choose the lovable fool?
Likability (and familiarity) Pros:
oWe like people that are similar to us
validates our own characteristics and attitudes
similar working, communication and/or thinking style helps project flow)
oAlready know expectations
oComfortable with them, meaning more likely to be accepting of their differences
oLiability aids in everyone being more open to new ideas, willing to help, and trusting
Likability Cons:
oLimits range in perspectives; less innovation
oPeople may hesitate to challenge or reject a bad idea from someone they know/like
oPotentially less productive
Manufacturing likability
oPromote familiarity (familiarity likability) with cross-departmental projects/gatherings
Leveraging likability
oCapitalize by having them play the “effective hubs” (bridge gaps between diverse groups that
might not otherwise interact)
Reform the jerks
oRepresent a missed opportunity; expertise is untapped
oUse coaching and immediate feedback. Use rewards for them improving their social skills
Conclusion: it’s all about setting up each person in a situation of greatest success
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Reading: Hiring as cultural matching
Similarities and “fitting in “
oPerceived similarity to a firm’s existing employee base in leisure pursuits, background, and self-
presentation
Many employers use organizational culture as a way of motivating employees; enhance productivity,
profits, and creativity
Why is cultural fit prioritized by evaluators and firms?
oCulturally similar colleagues make rigorous work week more enjoyable, but not necessarily more
productive or successful.
oLessen turnover; culturally similar candidates likely to enjoy their jobs more stay longer
Firms sought surface level (ie. demographic) diversity in applicant pools, but deep level (ie. Cultural)
homogeneity in new hires
Extracurriculars matter!
Cultural similarities to self
oEvaluator represented the firm, and if the applicant fit with the evaluator, it would fit with the
other employees in the firm.
o“airplane test”
Fit is most important in law, and least important in consulting
Employers’ own experiences influence which qualities they emphasized or discounted
oBasically hiring “themselves”
oLevel of excitement evaluator has for candidate influences willingness to advocate for them
Pfeffer Ch 4 – Standing Out and Breaking Some Rules:
Asking usually works, but people find it uncomfortable
Often, standing out is worth the “risk” of developing a bad reputation
People are also afraid to ask for what they want
oAfraid of being perceived as weak or reliant
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oGetting turned down will hurt their self esteem
People underestimate the chances of others offering help (rejecting a favor has implications)
oThey will appear ungenerous
oSaying yes reinforces the grantor’s position of power, and is self-affirming / ego-enhancing
If you make your request as flattering as possible, compliance is even more likely
oEx. Obama arriving in the U.S. Senate and asked for help to build relationships
oEx. Gupta asking well-known figures to contribute in his book
People are more likely to accede to requests from others with whom they share even the most casual of
connections
oEx. same birthday
oEx. donate twice as much money to someone with the same name
Likeability is overrated (sometimes being overnice can translate to weakness or even lack of intelligence)
Likeability can create power, but power almost certainly creates likeability
oLike to be associated with those who are successful and have power
Cialdini Ch. 5 – Liking:
Classic example is Tupperware parties
oAttraction, security and obligation of friendship is what seals the deal/purchase
Factors of likability:
1. Physical attractiveness (associate good looking to “good”)
oBetter liked, more persuasive, lighter sentences/punishments, seen as more intellectual
2. Similarity
oOpinions, personality, background, lifestyle, appearance
oRequesters can manipulate similarity to increase liking and compliance
3. Compliments
oEx. car salesman sending cards to all of his former customers saying “I like you”
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