Textbook Notes (368,425)
Canada (161,877)
Economics (326)
ECON 110 (199)
Chapter

Chapter Notes.docx

4 Pages
118 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Economics
Course
ECON 110
Professor
Ian James Cromb
Semester
Winter

Description
September 12, 2012 Microeconomics Chapter One 1.1 The Complexity of the Modern Economy • An economy is a system, typically a very complex on, in which scarce resources  are allocated among competing uses. Decisions must be made about which goods  are produced and which are not, at what wage, and who consumes which goods at  what times.  • An economy based on free­market transactions is self organizing, with self­ interest as the foundation of the economic order Main Characteristics of Market Economies: • Self Interest: Individuals pursue their own self­interest, buying and selling what  seems best for them and their families • Incentives: People respond to incentives. Sellers usually want tot sell more when  prices are high; buyers usually want to buy more when prices are low • Market Prices and Quantities: Prices and quantities are determined in free markets  in which would­be sellers compete to sell their products to would­be buyers • Institutions: All these activities are governed by a set of institutions largely  created by the government 1.2 Scarcity, Choice, and Opportunity Cost • Economics is the study of the use of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited human  wants • A society’s resources are often divided into the three broad categories of land,  labour, and capital • Economists call such resources factors of production because they are used to  produce the things that people desire • Goods are tangible, services are intangible • Production: the act of making goods and services • Consumption: the act of using goods and services • Just as scarcity implies the need for choice, so choice implies the existence of  cost. A decision to have more of something requires a decision to have less of  something else • Opportunity Cost: the cost of using resources for a certain purpose, measured by  the benefit given by not using them. Every time a choice is made, opportunity  costs are incurred • Production Possibilities Boundary: A curve showing which alternative  combinations of commodities can just be attained if all available resources are  used efficiently. Illustrates scarcity, choice, and opportunity cost Four Key Economic Problems: • What Is Produced and How: concerns the allocation of scarce resources among  alternative uses. This resource allocation determines the quantities of various  goods that are produced • What Is Consumed and by Whom: economists seek to understand what  determines the distribution of a nation’s total output among its people • Why Are Resources Sometimes Idle: the economy is operating inside its  production possibilities boundary • Is Productive Capacity Growing: growth in productive capacity can be  represented by an outward shift of the production possibilities boundary • Questions relating to what is produced and how, and what is consumed and by  whom, fall within the realm of microeconomics  • Questions relating to the idleness of recourses and the growth of productive  capacity fall within the realm of macroeconomics • Microeconomics: the study of the causes and consequences of the allocation of  resources as it is affected by the workings of the price system • Macroeconomics: the study of the determination of economic aggregates such as  total output, the price level, employment, and growth 1.3 Who Makes the Choices and How? • Individuals sell the services of the factor that they own in what are collectively  called factor markets • The distribution of income refers to how the nation’s total income is distributed  among its citizens. This is largely determined by the price that each type of factor  service receives in factor markets • Consumers and producers are the basic decision makers in a market economy • Marginal decisions: a producer must evaluate the marginal cost of a worker and  weigh it against the marginal benefit of the worker. • A producer interest in maximizing its profit will hire the extra worker only if the  benefit in terms of extra revenue exceeds the cost in terms of extra wages Specialization: • One of the forms of production, specialization of the individual workers in the  production of particular goods or services  • There are two fundamental reason that it is efficient compared with universal self­ sufficiency • First, specialization allows each person to do what he or she can do relatively well  while leaving everything else to be done by others. The economy’s total 
More Less

Related notes for ECON 110

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit