Textbook Notes (368,776)
Canada (162,160)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 202 (19)
Chapter 2

Psyc202 Chapter 2 Frequency Distributions.docx

3 Pages
95 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 202
Professor
Ronald R Holden
Semester
Fall

Description
 Psyc202 Chapter 2 – Frequency Distributions                                                    Sept. 11 2.1 Introduction to Frequency Distributions ­ Frequency Distribution: an organized tabulation of the number of individuals  located in each category on the scale of measurement ­ Takes disorganized scores and organizes them from highest to lowest, grouping  together all individuals who have the same score ­ Presents a picture of how the individual scores are distributed 2.2 Frequency Distribution Tables ­ List different X values in a column from highest to lowest. Beside each X value,  we indicate the number of times that particular measurement occurred in the data  (‘f’) ­ Nominal scale values can be ordered in any order. All other 3 scales must be  ordered highest to lowest. ­ By adding up frequencies, you can find out the total number of scores  ­ Σf = N ­  Obtaining   ΣX From a Frequency Distribution Table:   ­ Add X values as many times as they appear in the frequency column.  Alternatively, multiply X­value by frequency to get fx. Add all fx values to  get ΣX. ­ Proportions and Percentages: ­ Proportion or ‘Relative Frequency’: measures the fraction of the total  group associated with each score. Ex. If 2  our of 10 people got a score of  4 the proportion would be 2/10 or 0.20. ­ Proportion describes frequency (f) in relation to the total number (N). ­ Grouped Frequency Distribution Tables: ­ Class Intervals: groups of scores rather than individual values.  Example: listing frequency of scores in the 90s and 80s versus listing  individually 99, 98, 87, 85, etc. ­ Rules of Intervals: 1. Grouped frequency distribution table should have about 10  intervals. 2. Width of each interval should be a relatively simple number. Ex.  Counting down by 5s or 10s. 3. Bottom score in each class interval should be a multiple of the  width. Ex. If counting down by 10s last # should be 10 4. All intervals should be the same width ­ Generally, the wider class intervals are, the more specific information is  lost ­ Real Limits and Frequency Distributions: ­ Note that real limits apply to frequency distribution tables. Example:  interval of 90­94 actually has a lower limit of 89.5 and an upper limit of  94.5. 90­94 are apparent limits not real limits.  ­ Note: the width of the interval must be the distance between the 2 real  limits. Ex. If interval goes up by 5 points then lower interval goes down by  5 points (89.5 and 94.5) 2.3 Frequency Distribution Graphs ­ General rule for graphs: height (Y­axis) should be 2/3 – ¾ length of the x­axis  (so X­axis should always be longer) ­ Graphs for Interval or Ratio Data: ­ If data from interval or ratio scale, 2 options: ­ Histograms: bar graph (remember that the width of bars must  reach real limits). No spaces between bars. If grouping scores,  make sure bar width includes all scores in group as well as real  limits (figure 2.3 page 45). ­ Modified Histogram: more basic and less accurate, but  frequency is shown by number of blocks rather than y­axis  (p. 45) ­ Polygons: a graph with dots connected by lines (not of best fit).  Starts at 0 and ends at 0. (p. 46). If using intervals, position dot in  middle of interval (find mean of interval). ­ Graphs for Nominal or Ordinal Data: ­ Bar Graphs: same as histograms but with spaces between bars ­ Graphs for Population Distributions: ­ When dealing w
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 202

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit