Textbook Notes (368,107)
Canada (161,650)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 202 (19)
Chapter 4

PSYC202 Chapter 4 Variability.docx

4 Pages
131 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 202
Professor
Ronald R Holden
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYC202 Chapter 4 – Variability ­ Variability: a quantitative measure of the degree to which scores in a distribution  are spread out or clustered together ­ Variability serves 2 purposes: o Describes the distribution  ▯whether scores clustered together or spread out   over a large distance. Difference between scores and difference between a  score and the mean. o Measures how well an individual score (or group of scores) represents the  entire distribution. Also tells you how much error to expect if you are  using a sample to represent a population ­ 3 measures of variability: range, interquartile range, standard deviation Range and Interquartile Range ­ Range = difference between largest score (Xmax) and smallest (Xmin) in  distribution (*remember to include real limits) ­ Since range described in terms of distance, it is typically used with interval or  ratio scales (continuous variable) ** remember that the concept of real limits  applies to continuous variables ­ Problem with range  ▯it’s limited by the 2 extremes (highest and lowest scores)  and my not reflect that actual distribution of scores ­ For Discrete variables, range is determined by counting the number of categories  from the one containing the smallest score to the one containing the largest score.  However, don’t forget to include the first category (ex. If counting categories  from 0­8, there’s actually 9 categories if you include 0). ­ Interquartile Range: the range covered by the middle 50% of the distribution  (ignore extreme scores). o Finding the interquartile range  ▯find first quartile or Q1 (boundary  separating lowest 25% from the rest of the distribution), then second  quartile or Q3 (boundary separating top 25% from the rest of the  distribution). The interquartile range = the distance between Q1 and Q3 o Easiest way to find it – draw a box histogram and count off lowest quarter  of boxes, and highest quarter of boxes, and you’re left with the middle.  (similar to finding a median for a continuous variable) ­ Semi­quartile Range: half the interquartile range. Measures distance from the  middle of the quartile range to either boundary of the quartile range. This is  usually done when interquartile range is used to describe variability o Calculated by dividing quartile range in half. o Excludes extreme scores but also loses 50% of info Standard Deviation and Variance for a Population ­ Most common & important measure of variability ­ Uses variability to consider the distance between each score and the mean  ▯ averages the average distance of scores from the mean (tells us if scores scattered  or close together) ­ Deviation: distance from the mean ­ Deviation Score = X­μ (score-mean) ­ Positives and negatives indicate whether a score is above (+)  the mean or below  (­) the mean ­ To find standard distance from the mean, add up all deviations and divide by N. ­  Mean of deviations is always 0    ­ Population Variance: equals the mean squared deviation (each X­μ value is  squared to get rid of positive/negatives). Variance is the average squared distance  from the mean, and gets rid of the problem of 0.  ­ Since the squared distance from the mean isn’t what we want, we must square  root the variance to get the standard deviation. ­ Standard Deviation = √Variance ­ Only used with interval or ratio scales ­ Can guess standard deviation if looking at a histogram. Look at mean, and check  how close the closest point to the mean is vs. how far the farther point from the  mean is. Subtract these and your standard deviation should fall somewhere in that  interval (ex. If closest score is 1 point away from mean and farthest score is 5  points away from mean, SD should fall somewhere between 1­5, particularly in  the middle, around ~3.) Formulas For Population Variance and Standard Deviation ­ Standard deviation and variance calculations differ slightly depending on whether  you’re using population or sample ­ Sum of Squared Deviations (SS): Sum of squared deviation scores o Definitional formula: SS = ∑(X­ μ) 2 2 2 o Computational formula: SS = ∑X - (∑X) (Avoids rounding error)          N ­ Both produce the same answer, but definitional formula should only be used  if N is small and the Mean is a whole number.  Final Formulas and Notation ­ Population Variance: SS      Also called σ 2     N ­ Population Standard Deviation: √(SS)   Square root of populatio
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 202

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit