Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 231 (65)
Chapter 2

PSYC231 Chapter 2 Freud: Psychoanalysis.docx

10 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 231
Professor
Angela Howell- Moneta
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC231 – Chapter 2: The Psychoanalytic Approach  02/07/2013 Psychoanalysis: Freud’s theory of personality and system of therapy for treating mental disorders ­ Psychoanalysis is based on clinical observations of patient’s feelings and past experiences, which are  creatively interpreted. Freud considered both conscious and unconscious processes, but focused especially  on the latter. Instincts: The Propelling Forces of the Personality ­ Instincts: in Freud’s system, mental representations of internal stimuli, such as hunger, that drive a  person to take certain actions Basic elements of personality, the motivating forces that drive behaviour A bodily need transformed into a feeling of tension transformed into a mental state/wish (to restore  equilibrium – homeostatic approach) ­ Freud thought that psychic energy could be displaced into substitute objects (ex. Sexual energy could be  displaced into sexual activity, or sports, or anything). He thought that how we chose to displace this energy  explained human diversity in behaviour ­ Types of Instincts: Life instincts: drive for survival of the individual and species by satisfying the needs for food, water, air,  and sex. Libido: to Freud, a form of psychic energy manifested by the life instincts, that drives a person toward  pleasurable behaviours and thoughts (not just sex) Cathexis: an investment of psychic energy in an object or person Death Instincts: the unconscious wish to die as well as the drive toward decay, destruction, and  aggression Aggressive drive: the compulsion to destroy, conquer, and kill Freud saw people as “predominantly pleasure­seeking” and saw sex as our primary motivation The Levels of Personality ­ The Conscious: all the sensations and experiences we are aware of at any given moment. Freud saw  the conscious as limited. ­ The Preconscious: the storehouse of memories, perceptions, and thoughts that we are not always  consciously aware of, but can easily summon into consciousness. ­ The Unconscious: the part of ourselves we are not aware of. Where the instincts and driving forces  behind our behaviours lie The Structure of Personality ­ The id: the aspect of personality associated with the instincts and the unconscious. A source of psychic  energy, the id operates according to the pleasure principle. Primary process thinking. Selfish, amoral,  primitive, rash. The id has no awareness of reality. Pleasure Principle: process by which id functions to avoid pain/tension and maximize pleasure Primary­Process Thought: childlike thinking by which the id attempts to satisfy the instinctual drives  (ex. fantasies) ­ The Ego: the rational aspect of the personality, responsible for directing and controlling the instincts  according to the reality principle. Both conscious and preconscious. Secondary­Process Thought: mature thought processes needed to deal rationally with the  external world The ego doesn’t try to suppress or thwart the id’s impulses, but rationalizes socially acceptable times,  places, and ways for the instincts to be satisfied Note that the ego cannot be independent of the id. It gains its energy and power from the id. Reality Principle: the ego function to provide appropriate constraints on the expression of the id  instincts If ego is too severely strained by id, superego, and reality, the result is anxiety ­ The Superego: the moral aspect of personality; the internalization of parental and societal values and  standards.  Conscience: a component of the superego that contains behaviours for which the child has been  punished Ego­ideal: a component of the superego that contains the moral or ideal behaviours for which a person  should strive/behaviours for which one has been praised for With development, parental control is replaced by self­control and we begin to experience shame & guilt for  immoral processes Doesn’t try to postpone impulses but tries to eliminate them overall. Ultimate goal = absolute morality. Anxiety: A Threat of the Ego ­ Freud believed that anxiety ultimately stemmed from our traumatic experience of being born (out of secure  womb into complex world). When we experience impending doom/anxiety thereafter, we are taken back to  the sense of helplessness we experience in infancy. ­ Anxiety (to Freud): a feeling of fear and dread without an obvious cause; reality anxiety  is a fear of tangible dangers; neurotic anxiety involves a conflict between id and ego; moral  anxiety involves a conflict between id and superego o Reality Anxiety ▯ serves to protect us from real dangers. However, these can sometimes  become abnormal (ex. phobias) o Neurotic Anxiety ▯ an unconscious fear of being punished for impulsively displaying id­ dominated behaviour. Tension between id and ego = anxiety.  o Moral Anxiety ▯ guilt or shame experienced when conflict between id and superego occurs. ­ In all cases, anxiety signifies that something is wrong and that the ego is threatened. How can the ego  protect itself? ▯ escape anxiety­evoking situation, inhibit impulsive need, obey the conscience (morality). If  none of these work, person likely to resort to defense mechanisms (the non­rational strategies of ego  defense) Defense Against Anxiety ­ Defense Mechanisms: strategies the ego uses to defend itself against the anxiety provoked by  conflicts of everyday life. Defense mechanisms involve denials or distortions of reality. We rarely use just one, and some overlap exists among the ones we use. Share 2 common characteristics: unconscious & distort/deny reality ­ Repression: a defense that involves unconscious denial of the existence of something that causes  anxiety ­ Denial: a defense that involves denying the existence of an external threat or traumatic event ­ Reaction Formation: a defense that involves expressing an id impulse that is the opposite of the one  that is truly driving the person (ex. a person threatened by sexual longing may become an intense crusader  against pornography) ­ Projection: a defense that involves attributing a disturbing impulse to someone else (ex. Claiming  someone hates you when you really hate them) ­ Regression: a defense that involves retreating to an earlier, less frustrating period of life and displaying  the usually childish behaviours characteristic of that more secure time ­ Rationalization: a defense that involves reinterpreting our behaviour to make it appear more  acceptable to us ­ Displacement: a defense that involves shifting impulses from a threatening object or from one that is  unavailable (ex. Replacing hostility towards one’s boss with hostility towards one’s child) ­ Sublimation: a defense that involves altering or displacing impulses by diverting instinctual energy into  socially acceptable behaviours Psychosexual Stages of Personality Development ­ Parent­child interactions contribute strongly to character development. Believed personality was  essentially formed and remained stable after 5 years of age. ­ Child tries to maximize pleasure­seeking impulses of id, while parents impose societal restrictions of  reality and morality ­ Psychosexual Stage of Development: the oral, anal, phallic, and genital stages through which  all children pass. In these stages, gratification of the id instincts depends on the stimulation of  corresponding areas of the body. A conflict exists in each stage that must be resolved before the child can  progress to the next stage ­ Oral (0­1): mouth. Pleasure derived from sucking, biting, swallowing.  Id dominant Infant completely dependent on mother. Mother’s responsiveness affects how infant will view the world  (good or evil) 2 stages of behaving in this stage:  Oral incorporative behaviour (taking in) Adults fixated at this level of the oral stage are excessively obsessed with eating, smoking, kissing, drinking  ▯ if as children they were well provided for/supported, th
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit