Textbook Notes (368,117)
Canada (161,660)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 231 (65)
Chapter 3

PSYC231 Chapter 3 Jung: Neo-Psychoanalytic Approach

6 Pages
128 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 231
Professor
Angela Howell- Moneta
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC231 – Chapter 3: Neo­Psychoanalytic Approach  02/07/2013 Analytical Psychology: Jung’s theory of personality Psychic Energy: Opposites, Equivalence, and Entropy ­ Jung downplayed the role of sex in psychic energy Saw “libido” as life energy, not sex energy; but agreed that it this energy was the driving force of personality  and behaviour ­ Psyche: Jung’s term for personality ­ Opposition Principle: Jung’s idea that conflict between opposing processes or tendencies is  necessary to generate psychic energy Every wish or feeling has its opposite. The greater the conflict, the greater the energy. ­ Equivalence Principle: the continuing redistribution of energy within a personality; if the energy  expended on certain conditions or activities weakens or disappears, that energy is transferred elsewhere in  the personality (unless this new location does not have equal psychic value, in which case energy will flow  into the unconscious) ­ Entropy Principle: a tendency toward balance/equilibrium within the personality; the ideal is an equal  distribution of psychic energy all over the structures of the personality ▯ note that if full equilibrium was ever  achieved, there would be no conflict and therefore no driving energy for personality The System of Personality ­ Ego: to Jung, the conscious aspect of personality ­ Personal unconscious, collective unconscious ­ Attitudes: Extraversion and Introversion: Extraversion: psyche oriented towards external world & other people Introversion: psyche oriented towards one’s own thoughts & feelings These are opposing mental attitudes. Everyone has aspects of both, but one is dominant (says Jung). The  subdominant one becomes more unconscious and may still influence our behaviour ­ 4 Psychological Functions of the Psyche: Sensing and intuition ▯ non­rational functions Thinking and Feeling ▯ rational functions that involved analyzing and evaluating our experiences. One of these groups is always dominant over the other. Furthermore, within that group, one characteristic is  dominant over the other.  ­ Psychological Types: 8 personality types based on interactions of the attitudes (Introversion &  Extroversion) and the functions (SI, TF) Extraverted, Thinking ▯ rigid, cold, repress feelings, strictly follow rules, try to be objective in all part of life. Extravert, Feeling ▯ highly emotional, conform to traditional values/morals they’ve been taught, sociable,  sensitive to opinions of others, emotionally responsive Extraverted, Sensing ▯ focus on pleasure, happiness and seeking new experiences. Highly adaptable and  outgoing Extraverted, Intuiting ▯ ability to exploit opportunities, creative and attracted to new ideas, inspire others,  make decisions based on feeling/intuition, move from one idea to the next Introverted, Thinking ▯ poor communication & sociability, value privacy and thoughts over feelings, focus on   understanding themselves rather than other people (appear inconsiderate) Introverted, Feeling ▯ deep emotion but avoid outward expression of it, tend to be quiet, inaccessible,  modest, and childish. Have little consideration for others’ feelings and thoughts and appear withdrawn, cold,  and self­assured Introverted, Sensing ▯ passive, calm, detached. Aesthetically sensitive, express themselves through art or  music, and tend to repress intuition Introverted, Intuiting ▯ focus too much on intuition, not enough on reality. Visionaries/daydreamers, poorly  understood by others, unconcerned by practical matter. Considered odd & eccentric, have difficulty coping  with everyday life & planning for future ­ The Personal Unconscious: reservoir of material that was once conscious but has been forgotten  or suppressed ­ Complexes: a core of pattern of emotions, memories, perceptions, and wishes in the personal  unconscious organized around a common theme, such as power or status. Complexes can be conscious or  unconscious ­ The Collective Unconscious: the deepest level of the psyche containing the accumulation of  inherited experiences of human and pre­human species Whatever experiences are universal (ancestral experiences), become part of our personality Jung believes that everyone in the world shares universal factors across history (a mother, birth, death,  danger, etc.). These features are passed down through generations and we are born predisposed
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit