Textbook Notes (368,448)
Canada (161,882)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 231 (65)
Chapter 7

PSYC231 ch. 7 - Allport: Motivation and Personality.docx

7 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 231
Professor
Angela Howell- Moneta
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC231 ch. 7 ­ Allport 04/20/2013 The Nature of Personality ­ Personality: the dynamic organization within the individual of those psychophysical systems that  determine characteristic behaviour and thought Dynamic organization = although growth and change is always occurring, it is always organized, not  random Psychophysical = the personality is a combination of both mind and body, it is neither all mental or all  physical Characteristic behaviour and thought = everything we think and do is characteristic, or typical, of us. Thus,  each person is unique. ­ Heredity and Environment: Heredity provides the personality with raw materials (physique, intelligence, temperament) that may be  shaped, expanded or limited by the conditions of our environment However the majority of our uniqueness comes from genetics as there is an infinite number of genetic  combinations and no 2 are ever repeated except for in twins No 2 people, not even siblings reared together in the same house, share the same environment because  they both experience it differently Therefore, Allport decided that personality should be studied through individuals (because everyone is  unique), not through the average among groups ­ Two Distinct Personalities: Allport saw personality is discrete/discontinuous Everyone is unique, and all adults are divorced from their past – the adult personality is not constrained by  childhood experiences 2 personalities – the childhood one which is driven by reflexes and biological urges. The adulthood one  which is driven by psychological drives Personality Traits: ­ Traits: to Allport, distinguishing characteristics that guide behaviour. Traits are measured on a continuum  and are subject to social, environmental, and cultural influences. Traits will respond in a similar manner to  different kinds of stimuli (consistent across contexts) Traits are real and exist within each of us (not theoretical) Traits determine/cause behaviour. They’re not just a reaction to stimuli, but can cause us to seek out certain  stimuli and then interact with the environment to produce behaviour Traits can be demonstrated empirically. By observing traits over time we can start to categorize similar traits  and consistent responses to various stimuli Traits are interrelated. They are each distinct characteristics but may often overlap (ex. Aggression and  hostility)  Traits vary with the situation. Ex. A person may display neatness in one situation and messiness in another.  What matters is that these behaviours are consistent within their environment Initially, Allport proposed 2 types of traits: Individual – unique to the individual Common – traits shared by a group, such as a culture. These traits are subject to change over time with  changing social standards & values. They are subject to social, environmental, and cultural differences.  Different cultures/groups have different common traits ­ Personality Dispositions: traits that are peculiar to an individual, as opposed to traits shared by a  number of people. The terms “trait” refers to common traits. Cardinal Trait: the most pervasive and powerful human traits that touch almost every aspect of a  person’s life. “A ruling passion” that dominates behaviour (ex. sadism) not everyone has one. Central Trait: the handful of outstanding traits that describe a person’s behaviour. Usually 5­10 basic  traits can accurately describe each one of us Secondary Traits: the least important traits, which a person may display inconspicuously and  inconsistently (ex. A minor preference for a specific type of food or music) Motivation: The Functional Autonomy of Motives ­ Allport believed that it was the present state that determined motivation and personality. He thought that  the past was past and had no influence unless it somehow exhibited a current motivating force ­ Allport supported consciousness, rationality and studying the present & future rather than the past. He  criticized Freud for studying the unconscious because thought our conscious motivations and decisions  were important aspects of our personality that should not be ignored.  ­ Functional Autonomy of Motives: the idea that motives in the normal, mature adult are  independent of childhood experiences in which they originally appeared. Even though we are still related to  our parents, we are psychologically independent from them. Ex. Someone starts working hard at a job in order to ensure financial security after retirement. However  once they earn enough for that, they continue working hard because working hard has become a  personality characteristic. The motivation to work, once a means to a specific end (money) has now  become an end in itself Aka previous motivations don’t matter, what matters is what exists now ­ Perseverative Functional Autonomy: the level of functional autonomy that relates to low­level  and routine behaviours Addiction, habitual ways of performing a dail
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit