Textbook Notes (368,317)
Canada (161,798)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 231 (65)
Chapter 9

PSYC231 – Ch. 9 - Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs.docx

7 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 231
Professor
Angela Howell- Moneta
Semester
Winter

Description
PSYC231 – Ch. 7 Maslow ­ Humanistic 04/19/2013 Personality Development: The Hierarchy of Needs: ­ Hierarchy of 5 Innate Needs: an arrangement of innate needs from strongest to weakest, that  activates and directs behaviour Order of needs from bottom to top: Physiological Needs: food, water, sex Safety Needs: security, order, stability Belongingness & love needs Esteem needs (from self & others) Need for Self­Actualization ­ Instinctoid Needs: Maslow’s term for the innate needs in his needs­hierarchy theory. Implies that  these needs are hereditary. ­ Although we have these needs from birth, the behaviours we use to satisfy them are learned and therefore  subject to variation from person to person These needs can be affected or overridden by learning, social expectations, and fear of disapproval ­ Lower needs must be at least partially met before people start looking to achieve higher needs. We cannot  focus on our ‘selves’ if we are worrying about survival.  ­ We are not driven by all the needs at the same time ▯ generally only one need will dominate our  personality at a given time (which one it is depends on which needs have been satisfied already) Characteristics of Needs: ­ The lower the needs, the greater their strength and priority. Higher needs are weaker needs. ­ Higher needs appear later in life.  Physio & safety – childhood Belongingness & esteem – adolescence Self­Actualization ­ midlife ­ Deficiency Needs: the lower needs; failure to satisfy them produces a deficiency in the body ­ Growing (being) Needs: the higher needs; although growth needs are less necessary than deficit  needs for survival, they involve the realization and fulfillment of human potential. Satisfaction of these  needs leads to improved health and longevity.  ­ Failure to satisfy lower needs results in crisis, failure to resolve higher needs does not. ­ Satisfaction of higher needs  requires better external circumstances (social, economic, political) than  gratification of lower needs ­ A need does not have to be satisfied fully before the next need in the hierarchy becomes important.  Maslow proposed a declining percentage of satisfaction for each need – ex. Physiological needs need 85%  satisfaction, 70% safety, 50% belongingness, 40% esteem, 10% actualization Physiological Needs: ­ Needs direct and control behaviour ­ In industrialized societies, physiological needs play a minimal role for most of us  Safety Needs: ­ Security drives typically important for infants and neurotic adults ­ Children haven’t yet learned how to inhibit their reactions to stressful and dangerous situations, so these  drives tend to control them Adults have learned to inhibit these responses Another indication of children’s security drives = their preference for structure or routine. Too much freedom  causes them stress and anxiety; they prefer some freedom but also guidance an direction ­ Neurotic adults also need structure and routine Avoid new experiences Keep everything compulsively organized and predictable ­ Regular adults are still slightly responsive to safety needs (ex. We save for the future to ensure economic  security) but not nearly to the extent of neurotics or children Belongingness and Love Needs: ­ These needs can be satisfied by any close/intimate relationship (family, friends, social relationships, etc) ­ Given our increasingly mobile society, it has become difficult to put down roots and form strong, secure  relationships. Some people overcome this by joining community groups like church, or volunteering to  “belong” somewhere ­ These needs do not require sex Esteem Needs: ­ 2 types, need to fill both: Esteem about ourselves ▯ self­worth Esteem from others ▯ recognition, status, social success ­ Meeting both of these = higher confidence and productivity ­ Not meeting these = inability to hope, feelings of worthlessness The Self­Actualization Need: ­ Self­Actualization: the fullest development of the self. Maximum realization and fulfillment of our  potentials, talents, and abilities. ­ Without this actualization, people will continue to feel restless, frustrated, and discontented ­ Everyone’s “thing” is different. It’s about maximizing the skill you’re best at. ­ Conditions necessary in order to satisfy self­actualization: Free of constraints imposed by self and society No distraction from lower level needs Must be secure in our self­image and our relationships; must be able to love and be loved in return Must have realistic knowledge of our strengths/weaknesses, virtues and vices ­ There are some exceptions to this order. For instance, people have been known to jump to higher needs  (ex. Expression of religious beliefs) at the cost of lower needs (ex. fasting until death). Another example is  the common switch between “Esteem” and “Love”, as some people believe they must first learn to love  themselves before they can be loved. Cognitive Needs: ­ Cognitive Needs: innate needs to know and to understand ­ The need to know is stronger than the need to understand ­ Evidence in support of these needs: Lab rats explore just for curiosity Historically, people have often sought knowledge at the expense of their safety needs/lives  Emotionally healthy adults complain of being bored and are attracted to the mysterious ­ These needs first develop in early childhood and even though they are innate, social experiences can  either reinforce or stifle this curiosity (which can be harmful to development) ­ These 2 needs of knowing and understanding overlap all 5 of Maslow’s other needs. Note: it is impossible  to self actualize if these 2 needs have not been met The Study of Self­Actualizers ­ Metamotivation (‘B­Motivation’): the motivation of self­actualizers, which involves maximizing  personal potential rather than striving for a particular object ­ Metamotivation: The motivation of people who are not self­actualizers is called D­motivation (for deficiency) – striving for  something specific to make up for something that is lacking within us (satisfy the deficiency) Metamotivation is about improving what we already have Metaneeds: states of growth of being toward which self­actualizers evolve – these needs are not specific  objects, but feelings like goodness, uniqueness, and perfection Metapathology: a thwarting of self­developing related to failure to satisfy metaneeds. This thwarts the  full development of personality because people are not able to meet their full potential. This leads to  depression, anxiety, helplessness, etc. and inability to pinpoint what goal would alleviate their distress ­ Characteristics of Self­Actualizers: Note: Only about 1% of the population reach self­actualizing points An efficient perception of reality ▯ view the world and those around them in an unbiased and  objective manner Acceptance of self, others, and nature ▯ accept own and others’ weaknesses (including society)   and don’t feel guilty about failure. Do not distort their self­image Spontaneity, Simplicity, Naturalness ▯ rarely hide feelings or emotions, and do not strive to  sa
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 231

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit