Textbook Notes (367,893)
Canada (161,477)
Psychology (1,111)
PSYC 271 (57)
Chapter 8

PSYC271 Chapter 8 The Sensorimotor System.docx

8 Pages
203 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 271
Professor
Peter J Gagolewicz
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYC271 – The Sensorimotor System 8.1 Three Principles of Sensorimotor Function 1. The sensorimotor system is hierarchically organized ­ Highest level (association cortex) to lowest levels (muscles) ­ Main advantage hierarchical organization = complex processing ­ Functional segregation  ▯each level of hierarchy characterized by different units  performing different functions ­ Main difference between sensory & sensorimotor system = direction of  information flow (sensory system = up, motor system = down) 2. Motor output is guided by sensory input ­ Sensory Feedback: sensory signals that are produced by a response and are  often used to guide the continuous of the response ­ Only responses not influenced by sensory feedback are ballistic movements:  brief, all­or­none, high­speed movements ­ Many adjustments in motor output controlled unconsciously by lower levels of  hierarchy 3. Learning can change the nature and locus of sensorimotor control ­ New actions being learned are performed under careful conscious control. As  learning develops, movements become more smooth and automatic ­ General Model of Sensorimotor System Function (pg.194) ­ Association Cortex  ▯Secondary motor cortex  ▯primary motor cortex  ▯brain  stem motor nuclei  ▯spinal motor circuits 8.2 Sensorimotor Association Cortex: ­ 2 major areas of sensorimotor association cortex:  posterior parietal association cortex  & dorsolateral prefrontal association cortex ­ Note: Association cortexes all receive info from more than 1 sensory system ­ Posterior Parietal Association Cortex: ­ Posterior Parietal Association Cortex: an area of association cortex that  receives input from the visual, auditory, and somatosensory systems and is  involved in perception of spatial location & guidance of voluntary behaviour ­ Posterior parietal cortex  ▯motor cortex (in frontal cortex)  ▯dorsolateral  prefrontal association cortex  ▯secondary motor cortex  ▯frontal eye field ­ Frontal Eye Field: a small area of prefrontal cortex that controls eye  movements ­ Posterior Parietal Cortex made of many small areas, each specialized for guiding  particular movements of eyes, head, arms, or hands ­ Damage to this area can produce deficits in perception & memory of spatial  relationships, accurate reaching & grasping, control of eye movement, attention ­ Apraxia: a disorder in which patients have great difficulty performing  movements when asked to do so out of context but can readily perform them  spontaneously in natural situations. Usually caused by damage to left posterior  parietal lobe ­ Contralateral Neglect: a disturbance of the patient’s ability to respond to  visual, auditory, and somatosensory stimuli on the side of the body opposite to a  site of brain damage, usually the left side of the body following damage to the  right parietal lobe ­ Patients with contralateral neglect can’t respond to things on the left side  of their visual field (egocentric left) OR the left (or right) side of objects,  not matter where they exist in the visual field (p. 196)  ▯though may  perceive them unconsciously ­ Dorsolateral Prefrontal Association Cortex: ­ Dorsolateral Prefrontal Association Cortex: area of the prefrontal association  cortex that plays a role in the evaluation of external stimuli and the initiation of  complex voluntary motor responses ­ Responds to characteristics & locations of objects ­ Response properties of neurons in this cortex suggest that decisions to initiate  voluntary movements are made in this cortex first 8.3 Secondary Motor Cortex ­ Secondary Motor Cortex: areas of the cerebral cortex that receive much of  their input from association cortex and send much of their output to primary  motor cortex ­ Consists of 2 major areas: supplementary & premotor cortex: ­ Supplementary Motor Area: area of the secondary motor cortex that is within  and adjacent to the longitudinal fissure ­ Premotor Cortex: area of secondary motor cortex that lies between the  supplementary motor area and the lateral fissure  ­ Identifying the Areas of Secondary Motor Cortex: ­ Secondary motor cortex consists of at least 8 areas in each hemisphere ­ Cingulate Motor Areas: 3 small areas of secondary motor cortex located in the  cortex of the cingulated gyrus of each hemisphere ­ Electrical stimulation of secondary motor cortex elicits complex movements,  often involving both sides of the body.  ­ Neurons become activate just prior to initiation of movement, and  continue to fire throughout the movement ­ Secondary motor cortex programs specific patterns of movement after receiving  general instructions from dorsolateral prefrontal cortex ­ Mirror Neurons: ­ Mirror Neurons: neurons that fire both when a person makes a particular  movement and when the person observes somebody else making the same  movement ­ Demonstrated in monkeys, but strong evidence of their existence in humans ­ Provide a possible mechanism for social cognition (knowledge of perceptions,  ideas, and intentions of others) ­ Mirror neurons illustrate that subject understands an action, not just responding  to superficial aspect of it. Fire even when object is covered by screen, but subject  can image that that object is being picked up (not just a purely visual response) ­ Mirror neurons also found in posterior parietal lobe 8.4 Primary Motor Cortex ­ Primary Motor Cortex: cortex of the precentral gyrus, which is the major point  of departure for motor signals descending from the cerebral cortex into lower  levels of the sensorimotor system ­ Conventional View of Primary Motor Cortex Function: ­ Primary motor cortex organized somatotopically ­ Somatotopic: organized, like the primary somatosensory cortex, according to a  map of the surface of the body ­ Motor Homunculus: the somatotopic map of the human primary motor cortex ­ Primary motor cortex controls body parts capable of intricate movements ­ Received feedback info from receptors in muscles & joints  ▯this occurs  differently in monkeys – receive info from skin receptors ­ Stereognosis: the process of identifying objects by touch ­ Current View of Primary Motor Cortex Function: ­ Somatotopic organization, but many overlapping systems  ▯lesion in one area  disrupts various specific motor movements, never a single area ­ Neurons respond more to movement towards a target rather than a specific  direction of movement ­ This means that signals diverge greatly, allowing any body part to move  towards a target regardless of starting position ­ Primary motor cortex extremely plastic & relies heavily on  somatosensory feedback ­ Plays a major role in initiating movements ­ Effects of Primary Motor Cortex Lesions: ­ Large lesions may disrupt ability to move one body part independently of others  (astereognosia) and reduce speed & accuracy. Do not restrict movement totally  however because many pathways descend from secondary motor cortex without  passing through primary. 8.5 Cerebellum and Basal Ganglia ­ Both important sensorimotor structures but neither a major part of the pathway  descending through sensorimotor hierarchy  ▯interact with mechanisms at various levels  of the hierarchy, coordinating and modulating its activities ­ Explain why damage to cortical connections between visual cortex and frontal motor  areas not abolish visually guided responses ­ Cerebellum: ­ Only 10% of brain, but contains more than half of brain’s neurons ­ Receives info from primary & secondary motor cortex, info about descending  motor signals from brain stem, and feedback from motor responses via  somatosensory & vestibular systems ­ Cerebellum analyzes input from these 3 areas and corrects any  movements that deviate from their course ­ Key for motor learning ­ Damage hinders precision of actions, ability to adapt motor movements to  changing situations, ability to maintain steady posture (leads to tremors), motor  learning, balance, speech, control of eye movement ­ Basically fine­tunes and learns cognitive processes & motor responses ­ Organized systematically ­ Basal Ganglia: ­ Organization: complex, heterogeneous collection of interconnected nuclei ­ Play a modulatory role like cerebellum ­ Play a role in carrying signals to and from motor areas of cortex ­ Role in response learning  ▯learning to respond correctly to receive  reinforcer/avoid punishment 8.6 Descending Motor Pathways ­ Neural signals conducted from primary motor cortex to spinal cord over 4 different  pathways: 2 descend in the dorsolateral region of spinal cord, 2 descend in ventromedial  region of spinal cord  ▯act together to control voluntary movement ­ The sensorimotor system does not work if communication between pathways poor ­ Dorsolateral Corticospinal Tract and Dorsolateral Corticorubrospinal Tract: ­ Dorsolteral Corticospinal Tract: motor tract that leaves the primary motor  cortex, descends to the medullary pyramids, decussates, and then descends in the  contralateral dorsolateral spinal white matter (direct path) ­ Betz Cells: large pyramidal neurons of the primary motor cortex that  synapse directly on motor neurons in the lower regions of the spinal cord ­ Axons synapse on interneurons of spinal gray matter s ▯ ynapse on motor  neurons of distal muscles of wrists, hands, fingers & toes  ­ Dorsolateral Corticorubrospinal Tract: descending motor tract that synapses  in the red nucleus of the midbrain, decussates, and descends in the dorsolateral  spinal white matter (indirect path) ­ Second group of axons descending from primary motor cortex synapse in  red nucleus of midbrain  ▯descend through medulla (some control facial  muscles, others continue)  ▯dorsolateral corticorubrospinal tract  ▯synapse  on interneurons  ▯synapse on motor neurons  ▯project signal to muscles in  arms & legs ­ Ventromedial Corticospinal Tract & Ventromedial Cortico­brainstem­Spinal Tract: ­ Ventromedial Corticospinal Tract: the direct ventromedial motor pathway,  which descends ipsilaterally from the primary motor cortex directly into the  ventromedial areas of the spinal white matter (direct path) ­ Axons descend ipsilaterally from primary motor cortex  ▯ventromedial  areas of spinal white matter  ▯axons branch into several circuits in various  spinal areas on both side of the gray matter ­ Ventromedial Cortico­brainstem­Spinal Tract: the indirect ventromedal  motor pathway, which descends bilaterally from the primary motor cortex to  several interconnected brain stem motor structures and then descends in the  ventromedial portions of the spinal cord (indirect path) ­ Motor cortex axons feed into various brain stem structures  ▯axons  further descend into ventromed
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 271

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit