Textbook Notes (368,089)
Canada (161,636)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 271 (57)
Chapter 7

PSYC271 Chapter 7 Mechanisms of Perception: Hearing, Touch, Smell, Taste, and Attention.docx

7 Pages
138 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 271
Professor
Peter J Gagolewicz
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYC271 Chapter 7 ­ Mechanisms of Perception: Hearing, Touch, Smell, Taste, and  Attention 7.1 Principles of Sensory System Organization ­ Primary Sensory Cortex: area of sensory cortex that receives most of its input directly  from the thalamic relay nuclei of one sensory system ­ Secondary Sensory Cortex ­ Association Cortex: area of cortex that receives input from more than one sensory  system ­ These 3 interact with each other through hierarchical organization, functional  segregation, and parallel processing ­ HIERARCHICAL ORGANIZATION: ­ Hierarchical organization: organization into a series of levels that can be  ranked with respect to one another; for example, primary cortex, secondary  cortex, and association cortex perform progressively more detailed analyses ­ Sensory system organization: ­ Association Cortex  ▯most complex analyses ­ Secondary Sensory Cortex ­ Primary sensory cortex ­ Thalamic Relay Neuron ­ Receptors  ▯simplest analyses ­ Sensation: the process of detecting the presence of stimuli ­ Perception: the higher­order process of integrating, recognizing, and  interpreting complex patterns of sensations ­ FUNCTIONAL SEGREGATION: ­ Functional Segregation: organization into different areas, each of which  performs a different function; ex. in sensory systems, different areas of secondary  and association cortex analyze different aspects of the same sensory stimulus ­ PARALLEL PROCESSING: ­ Parallel Processing: simultaneous analysis of a signal in different ways by the  multiple parallel pathways of the neural network ­SUMMARY MODEL OF SENSORY SYSTEM ORGANIZATION ­ Sensory systems characterized by division of labour, multiple levels &  connections, and different specializations ­ ‘The binding problem’: how does the brain integrate all this information to  produce perceptions? Perceptions are the product of combined activity of different  interconnected cortical areas ­ Like the visual system, movement is not linear, top­down information flows  occur 7.2 Auditory System ­ Sounds are vibrations of molecules that stimulate the auditory system ­ Real life sound outside the lab is always complex ­ ‘Missing Fundamental’: when presented with different pitches, the pitch we perceive is  always the highest pitch that can be divided into each pitch presented. Ex. if pitch  presented has frequencies 100, 200 ,400. We hear pitch of 100 because it can be divided  into each frequency. ­ Fourier Analysis: mathematical procedure for breaking down complex wave form (eg.  EEG signal) into component sine waves of varying frequency ­ THE EAR: ­ Sound travels into ear  ▯hits eardrum (vibrates)  ▯vibrations transferred to 3  ossicles  ▯vibration of ossicles trigger vibration of Oval Window  ▯Vibrations  transferred to cochlea (organ of corti is inside cochlea)  ▯hair cells inside cochlea  vibrate  ▯stimulated hair cells fire in axons of the auditory nerve ­ Vibrations in cochlea stopped by the round window ­ Different frequencies produce maximal stimulation of hair cells at different  points along the basilar membrane. Higher frequency = greater activation closer to  windows, lower frequency = greater activation closer to basilar membrane ­ Tympanic Membrane: the eardrum ­ Ossicles: the 3 small bones of the middle ear: malleus, incus & stapes ­ Oval Window: the membrane that transfers vibrations from the ossicles to the  fluid of the cochlea ­ Cochlea: long, coiled tube in the inner ear that is filled with fluid and contains  the organ of Corti and its auditory receptors ­ Organ of Corti: auditory receptor organ, comprising the basilar membrane, the  hair cells, and tectorial membrane. Located inside cochlea. ­ Hair Cells: the receptors of the auditory system ­ Basilar Membrane: membrane of the organ of Corti in which the hair cell  receptors are embedded ­ Tectorial Membrane: the cochlear membrane that rests on the hair cells ­ Auditory Nerve: branch of the cranial nerve VIII that carries auditory signals  from the hair cells in the basilar membrane ­ Tonotopic: Organized according to the frequency of sound ­ Semicircular Canals: the receptive organs of the vestibular system ­ Vestibular System: the sensory system that detects changes in the direction and  intensity of head movements and that contributes to the maintenance of balance  through its output to the motor system ­ FROM EAR TO PRIMARY AUDITORY CORTEX: ­ No major pathway, but a network of auditory pathways ­ Axons of each auditory nerve synapse in ipsilateral cochlear nuclei  ▯leads to the  superior olives  ▯axons from olives project to inferior colliculi  ▯inferior colliculi  synapse onto medial geniculate nuclei  ▯project to primary auditory cortex ­ Superior Olives: Medullary nuclei that play a role in sound localization ­ Inferior Colliculi: structures of the tectum that receive auditory input from the  superior olives ­ Medial Geniculate Nuclei: the auditory thalamic nuclei that receive input from  other inferior colliculi and project to primary auditory cortex ­ SUBCORTICAL MECHANISMS OF SOUND LOCALIZATION: ­ Sound localization mediated by lateral & medial superior olives. Lateral  olives pick up on differences in amplitude of sound, medial olives pick up on  differences in arrival of sound ­ Both olives project to inferior & superior collicus ­ Superior Collicus: receives both visual & auditory input. Responsible for  locating sources of sensory input in space ­ AUDITORY CORTEX: ­ Hidden in the temporal lobe. Secondary cortex surrounds primary cortex  (‘band’) and areas of secondary cortex outside the belt are called ‘parabelt’.  Together, all 3 areas known as ‘the core region’ ­ Organization of primate auditory cortex: ­ Organized in functional columns like visual ­ Organized tonopically (based on frequency) ­ 2 streams of auditory cortex: ­ 2 large areas of association cortex: prefrontal cortex (‘what’) and  posterior parietal cortex (‘where’) ­ Auditory­visual interactions: ­ Association cortexes are home to many different sensory pathways.  These are areas where interactions/integration occurs. ­ Recent research shows there might be sensory interaction as low as  primary sensory cortex ­ Where does the perception of pitch occur? ­ Just anterior of primary auditory cortex. Area where frequency of sound  is converted to perception of pitch. ­ EFFECTS OF DAMAGE TO AUDITORY SYSTEM: ­ Auditory Cortex Damage: ­ Damage usually studied by lesions in primary auditory cortex and core  region. If bilateral lesions ­ hearing recovers in weeks but ability to  localize sound and ability to discriminate frequencies gone. ­ Deafness in Humans: ­ Total deafness is rare because if one auditory pathway destroyed,  information can travel through a different pathway ­ Conductive deafness: deafness due to damages ossicles ­ Nerve Deafness: deafness due to damaged cochlea/auditory nerve ­ Loss of hair receptors ­ If only part damaged, can still hear some frequencies but not  others (what happens in aging) ­ cochlear implants convert signals into electrical messages and  send it to cochlea through electrodes.  7.3 Somatosensory System: Touch and Pain ­ Somatosensory system has 3 systems: exteroreceptive (senses external stimuli),  proprioceptive (monitor information about body position – balance, muscles, joints),  interoceptive (general info about body condition – temperature, BP) ­ CUTANEOUS RECEPTORS (4 types): ­ Free Nerve Endings: nerve endings that lack specialized structures on them and  that detect cutaneous pain and changes in temperature ­ Pacinian Corpuscles: the largest and most deeply positioned cutaneous  receptors, which are sensitive to sudden displacements of the skin but not to  constant pressure ­ Merkel’s Disks & Ruffini endings adapt slowly and respond to gradual skin  indentation & skin stretching ­ Stereognosis: the process of identifying objects by touch ­ Some receptors adapt quickly to stimuli (reduce neural firing), others adapt  slowly. Both useful and provide info about dynamic and static qualities of  stimulus ­ Each somatosensory receptor specialized to a particular type of stimulation, but  all function similarly  ▯stimuli applied to skin changes permeability of receptor  cell membrane to certain ions. Result = neural signal. ­ DERMATOMES: ­ Neural fibers that carry info from cutaneous receptors to other somatosensory  receptors gather together in nerves and enter the spinal cord via the dorsal roots. ­ Dermatome: an area of the body that is innervated by the left and right dorsal  roots of one segment of the spinal cord ­ Basically, areas of the body controlled by certain parts of the spinal cord ­ TWO MAJOR SOMATOSENSORY PATHWAYS: ­ Info from the body ascends to the cortex in 1 of 2 pathways: 1.  Dorsal­Column Medial­Leminiscus System: the division of the  somatosensory system that descends in the dorsa
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 271

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit