Textbook Notes (368,986)
Canada (162,320)
Psychology (1,112)
PSYC 271 (57)
Chapter 6

PSYC271 Chapter 6 The Visual System.docx

8 Pages
158 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 271
Professor
Peter J Gagolewicz
Semester
Fall

Description
PSYC271 Chapter 6: The Visual System 6.1 Light Enters the Eye and Reaches the Retina ­ Sometimes light behaves like particles, sometimes it behaves like waves ­ Our eyes respond to different wavelengths differently ­ Infrared waves  ▯too long for humans to see ­ Wave length = colour perception ­ Wave intensity = brightness perception ­ The Pupil and the Lens: ­ Iris controls amount of light entering the retina ­ Light enters eye through pupil (hole in iris)  ▯width of pupil changes based on  how much light its letting in and affects: ­ Sensitivity: in vision, the ability to detect the presence of dimly lit  objects ­ Acuity: the ability to see the details of an object ­ Lens (located behind pupil), aims incoming light towards the retina. The lens  shape is controlled by ciliary muscles ­ these are activated when we look at  something. By changing shape of lens, it ‘bends’ light and brings close objects  into sharp focus. Distant object  ▯lens is flat. ­ Ciliary Muscles: the eye muscles that control the shape of the lenses ­ Eye Position and Binocular Disparity: ­ Eyes on front of head allow you to view 1 object from 2 angles, creating depth  perception. The closer the object is, the more your eyes ‘converge’ (move  inwards) to see the same object. ­ Binocular Disparity: the difference in the position of the retinal image of the  same object on the 2 retinas (your eyes will always see a single object from 2  slightly different points of view). Difference greater for closer objects. 6.2 The Retina and Translation of Light into Neural Signals ­ Lens sends light to retina, retina converts light to neural signals, conducts them towards  CNS, and participates in the processing of signals ­ Retina’s 5 layers (in order) of different types of neurons: ­ Retinal Ganglion Cells: retinal neurons whose axons leave the eyeball and  form the optic nerve ­ Amacrine Cells: a type of retinal neurons whose specialized function is lateral  communication (horizontal) ­ Bipolar Cells: bipolar neurons that form the middle layer of the retina ­ Horizontal Cells: type of retinal neurons whose specialized function is lateral  communication ­ Receptors: cells that are specialized to receive chemical, mechanical, or radiant  signals from the environment ­ Retinal cells communicate both chemically via synapses and electrically via gap  junctions ­ Retina works backwards. Light travels through all these layers until it hits back of eye  (cone & rod receptor cells) and then travels backwards to retinal ganglion cells. ­ 2 issues with this system:  1. Light gets distorted through layers before reaching receptors 2. Area where bundles retinal ganglion cell axons leave the eye leaves a  gap in the layer  ▯this is a blind spot. ­ Blind Spot: the area on the retina where the bundle of axons of the retinal ganglion  cells penetrate the receptor layer and leave the eye as the optic nerve ­ Fovea: the central indentation of the retina, which is specialized for high­acuity vision.  Helps overcome problem of light distortion through layers because layer of retinal  ganglion cells is thin here, so less light distorted. ­ Completion: the visual system’s automatic use of information obtained from receptors  around the blind spot, or scotoma, to create a perception of the missing portion of the  retinal image ­ We constantly use completion by taking in minimal information and filling in  the gaps to form our perception ­ Surface Interpolation: the process by which the visual system perceives large surfaces,  by extracting information about edges and from it, inferring the appearance of adjacent  structures ­ CONE AND ROD VISION: ­ Cones: the visual receptors in the retina that mediate high acuity colour vision in  good lighting. Most are located in the fovea. ­ Rods: the visual receptors in the retina that mediate achromatic, low­acuity  vision under dim light ­ No rods in the fovea, but rods increase at boundaries of fovea and cones  decrease ­ More rods in the nasal hemiretina (half of eye closer to nose) than  temporal hemiretina (half of eye closer to temples) ­ Duplexity Theory: the theory that cones and rods mediate photopic and  scotopic vision, respectively.  ­ Photopic Vision:  cone­mediated colour vision, predominates in bright light ­ A few cones converge on each retinal cell (‘low convergence’). Cones  attach to RGC through bipolar cells. ­ Since fewer cones per RCG, easier to locate where stimulus came from ­ Scotopic Vision: rod­mediated acuity vision, predominates in dim light ­ Several hundreds of rods converge on a single ganglion cell (‘high  convergence’). Rods attaches to RGC through bipolar cells. ­ Since many rods per RCG, very difficult for brain to locate where  stimulus came from ­ Spectral Sensitivity: ­ Spectral Sensitivity Curve: how bright a light appears when it is the same  intensity but has different wavelengths. ­ Photopic Spectral Sensitivity Curve: the graph of the sensitivity of  cone­mediated vision to different wavelengths of light ­ Tested by shining different wavelengths of light on fovea ­ Maximally sensitive to wavelengths of 560 nanometers. Thus,  intensity of 500 nanometer light would have to be increased to  appear as bright as 560 nanometer light. ­ Scotopic Spectral Sensitivity Curve: the graph of the sensitivity of rod­ mediated vision to different wavelengths of light ­ Tested by shining different wavelengths of light on boundary of  fovea ­ Maximally sensitive to wavelengths of 500 nanometers. Thus,  intensity of 560 nanometer light would have to be increased to  appear as bright as 500 nanometer light. ­ Purkinje Effect: in intense light, red and yellow wavelengths look brighter than  blue and green wavelengths of equal intensity; in dim light, blue and green  wavelengths look brighter than red and yellow wavelengths of equal intensity ­ EYE MOVEMENT: ­ Temporal Integration  ▯eyes constantly scanning visual field, and our visual  perception at any instant is a summation of recent visual information ­ Fixational Eye Movements: involuntary movements of the eyes (tremors,  drifts, and saccades) that occur when a person tries to fix his gaze on a point.  Three types: tremors, drifts, and saccades ­ Saccades: the rapid movements of the eyes between fixations  ­ Visual neurons respond to change. If retinal images somehow stopped from  moving, the image would start to disappear and reappear  ­  VISUAL TRANSDUCTION: CONVERSION OF LIGHT INTO NEURAL SIGNALS:     ­ Transduction: the conversion of one form of energy into another ­ Visual Transduction  ▯conversion of light into neural signals by visual  receptors ­ Rhodopsin: the photopigment (pigment = light absorbing substance) of  rods.  ­ If exposed to very bright light, it loses its colour and stops absorbing  light. If returning to dark, returns to normal. ­ In dim light, our sensitivity to certain wavelengths is a direct  consequence of Rhodopsin’s ability to absorb them ­ When rods in darkness, rhodopsin is inactive, sodium channels partially  open, keeping rods slightly depolarized, allowing steady outflow of  glutamate, and allows rods to function properly. When in bright light,  bleaching of rhodopsin leads to it binding with Transducin, activating an  enzyme that breaks down cGMP, leading to sodium channels closing, rods get hyperpolarized, and inhibit glutamate  release. ­ Absorption Spectrum: a graph of the ability of a substance to absorb light of  different wavelengths 6.3 From Retina to Primary Visual Cortex ­ Retina­Geniculate­Striate Pathways: the major visual pathway from each retina to the  striate cortex (primary visual cortex) via the lateral geniculate nuclei of the thalamus ­ About 90% of retinal ganglion axons are in the pathway ­ Primary Visual Cortex: area of the cortex that receives direct input from the lateral  geniculate nuclei  ­ Lateral Geniculate Nuclei: 6­layered thalamic structures that receive input from the  retinas and transmit their output to the primary visual cortex ­ All signals from the left eye reach the right primary visual cortex. Either ipsilaterally  (same side) from the temporal hemiretina, or contralaterally (opposite­side through optic  chiasm) from the nasal hemiretina of the left eye. Vice versa for right eye. ­ RETINOTOPIC ORGANIZATION: ­ Retinotopic: organized like a map of the retina. Primary visual cortex organized  like this. ­ 2 stimuli presented to adjacent areas of the retina excite adjacent neurons  at all levels of the system ­ Although fovea tiny part of retina, primary visual cortex dedicates 25%  to analyzing its input (high­acuity vision) ­ THE M AND P CHANNELS: ­ Parvocellular Layers: layers of the lateral geniculate nuclei that are composed  of neurons with small cell bodies; the top 4 layers (‘P layers’) ­ Responsive to colour, detail, and stationary objects, mostly cones ­ Magnocellular Layers: layers of the lateral geniculate nuclei that are composed  of neurons with large cell bodies; the bottom 2 layers (‘M layers’) ­ Responsive to movement, mostly rods ­ These 2 different layers form 2 separate communication channels and project to  different parts of the visual cortex 6.4 Seeing Edges ­ Perception of edge is simply the perception of contrast between 2 adjacent areas of the  visual field ­ LATERAL INHIBITION AND CONTRAST ENHANCEMENT: ­ Mach Bands: nonexistent stripes of brightness and darkness running adjacent to  an edge. Enhance contrast and make edge easier to see ­ Contrast Enhancement: the intensification of the perception of edges ­ Lateral Inhibition: firing receptor inhibits lateral neurons/receptors around it ­ Contrast enhancement governed by firing rate of receptors on either side of an  edge. The receptor closest to the brighter side of the edge will fire more than the  other receptors on this side because it is experiencing less lateral inhibition.  Similarly, the receptor closest to the edge on the dimly lit side fires less than the  rest of the receptors on that side.  ­ RECEPTIVE FIELDS OF VISUAL NEURONS: ­ Receptive Field: the area of the visual field within which it is possible for the  appropriate stimulus to influence the firing of a visual neuron ­ Hubel &Wiesel  ▯placed electrodes near a single neuron in the visual system.  Paralyzed eye movements. Focus image on retina. Identify receptive field. Record  responses & identify which stimuli effect neural activity most. Repeat these steps  and begin to move higher through the visual system to understand increasing  complexity of neuronal activity at each level. ­ RECEPTIVE FIELDS: NEURONS OF THE RETINA­GENICULATE­STRIATE  SYSTEM ­ Hubel & Wiesel found little change in receptive fields throughout different areas  of the retina­geniculate­striate system. Commonalities found: ­ Receptive fields in f
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 271

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit