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Chapter Creative Capital Gains

CRI 100 Chapter Notes - Chapter Creative Capital Gains: Worldpride, African Guitar Summit, Web Design


Department
Creative Industries
Course Code
CRI 100
Professor
Dr.Louis Etienne Dubois
Chapter
Creative Capital Gains

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CRI 100 11/21/16
Week 11 Readings
Creative capital gains: an action plan for Toronto
o Culture animates a city, and everyone who lives or works in our city has the potential to be
creative and culture stimulates that creativity.
o Culture creates
real competitive advantage.
o Toronto’s cultural and creative capital creates businesses, attracts new residents from around the
world, draws in tourists, increases quality of life for its current residents, and gives commuters
from the suburbs a reason to stay in the city after office hours.
o The business community, not-for-profit foundations and organizations, individuals and the
cultural community must all play their roles if Toronto is truly to become one of the world’s
creative capitals.
o There are three broad overarching themes that fit this framework:
i. Focusing on service
ii. Using the City’s convening power
iii. Making cultural investments where only the City can
Service
o Every consumer is a potential producer, and every producer is a potential consumer.
o These consumers include tourists, residents, commuters, kids, individual artists and art
organizations.
o At present, the City of Toronto’s enormous creative capital is constrained because it necessarily
forms part of different City departments, agencies, boards and commissions.
o We urge the Mayor to convene a Creative Capital Working Group to coordinate all these
creative resources. The Working Group would join all the arts and creative disciplines in the City
administrations, working with those in the private sector, the province and the federal
government to improve Toronto’s creative capital and more.
Convening power
o We invite the Mayor to convene periodic Mayor’s Breakfasts for Toronto’s cultural attraction and
business leaders to discuss upcoming opportunities and events, to support tourism and to
facilitate greater information and knowledge exchange.
Cultural investments
o To maintain and build significant competitive advantage, the City needs to bring its commitment
to culture to be more in line with that of other global creative capitals.

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CRI 100 11/21/16
Week 11 Readings
o Toronto can create jobs and wealth, attract and retain talent, build stronger neighbourhoods,
and build a prosperous city through culture.
o We have an opportunity to capitalize on our strong economic position relative to many of our
competitors by recognizing that culture is the fundamental driver of Toronto’s future prosperity.
Creative capital gains
o Toronto is recognized internationally as one of the world’s most liveable cities, with safe and
healthy neighbourhoods, a competitive business climate, and a vibrant culture.
o Toronto has a wealth of creative capital to exploit—from its training centers, skilled workers, and
great cultural institutions and festivals, to its unrivalled diversity and exciting cultural scenes.
o The city’s cultural sector helps us to attract and retain talent from around the world. Toronto’s
cultural economy contributes more than $9 billion annually to Toronto’s GDP and employs more
than 130,000 people.
o The culture sector in Toronto employs six times more workers than Ontario’s aerospace industry
and is roughly equivalent to the 135,000 people employed in Ontario’s automotive sector.
o The challenges include: access to affordable and sustainable space for cultural organizations in
many neighbourhoods; space and infrastructure for start-up cultural entrepreneurs; the equitable
distribution of cultural services throughout the city and to all segments of the population;
o We recommend that the city:
- Ensure a supply of affordable, sustainable cultural space.
- Ensure access and opportunity for cultural participation to all citizens regardless of age,
ethnicity, ability, sexual orientation, geography, or socioeconomic status.
- Support the development of creative clusters and emerging cultural scenes to capitalize on
their potential as generators of jobs and economic growth.
Taking stock
o Our creative sector draws talent because workers in the knowledge economy value a thriving arts
and culture scene. There is a direct correlation between education and cultural consumption,7
and Toronto’s workforce is one of the most educated in Canada: more than 55% of Toronto
residents over the age of 15 hold post-secondary degrees or certifications.
Human capital
When it comes to creative talent, Toronto is blessed with deep bench strength:
- 66% more artists than any other city in Canada:
- 1 in every 4 creative industry jobs in Canada (Toronto CMA)18
- 1 in 3 of the province’s cultural workers (while Toronto has 1 in 5 of all Ontario workers)
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CRI 100 11/21/16
Week 11 Readings
This critical mass of cultural workers and artists is the foundation of our creative economy and acts
as a magnet which attracts talent both in and out of the cultural sector.
o Toronto also has a wealth of renowned educational institutions, such as Canada’s National Ballet
School, the Canadian Film Centre, and the Royal Conservatory of Music’s Glenn Gould School,
which provide world-class training, as well as a number of high-quality post-secondary
institutions, including OCAD University, North America’s fourth-largest school of art, the
University of Toronto, Ryerson University, York University, Centennial College, George Brown
College, Humber College, Seneca College, and Sheridan College.
The funding mix
o Toronto’s cultural community depends on both the private and the public sectors working
together to fund it.
o Private sector support for arts and cultural events and cultural institutions is five and a half times
that of municipal support, and almost equals public sector investment from all three levels of
government
Cultural space
o Most of Toronto’s cultural organizations, many of them long-established, work in repurposed
heritage and industrial buildings that desperately need new roofs, windows, boilers, ducts,
plumbing, and energy-efficient heating and cooling systems. Simply meeting basic building code
requirements and ensuring public safety in these buildings will require $30 million of investment
over the next five years.
o The cultural industries and community arts sectors suffer from the lack of access to affordable
space in Toronto’s neighbourhoods.
o This infrastructure gap makes it difficult to ensure all Torontonians have access to cultural
programming where they live.
Recommendation 1
We recommend that the City ensure a supply of affordable, sustainable cultural space.
i. Reinstate the Culture Build program to address the state of good repair in cultural
facilities.
ii. Integrate culture and Toronto’s cultural institutions into the City’s Pedestrian Way-finding
System strategy for both visitors and residents.
iii. Direct Cultural Services to work with other agencies (Libraries, Parks, Forestry and
Recreation, the Toronto District School Board, etc.), and Toronto’s City-owned museums
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