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Chapter Ch. 1-2, 7

CRI 100 Chapter Notes - Chapter Ch. 1-2, 7: Canada Council, Final Good, Culture Of Canada


Department
Creative Industries
Course Code
CRI 100
Professor
Dr.Louis Etienne Dubois
Chapter
Ch. 1-2, 7

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CRI 100 10/03/16
Week 4 - Readings
Cultural Industries.ca
Chapter 1: Film and television: a success?
Private Television: three assumptions
1.
Canadian viewers prefer American TV and content
o The Canadian TV sucks problem
o “low budget” compared to American Television
Contrary:
Television production created billions in economic activity
Broadcasters generated over 7 billion on top of that
o 2010 Canadian broadcasters saw an 8.1% increase
Bureau of broadcast measurement
o 7 out of 10 of the most watched broadcasts in Canada were Canadian
o However, the most watched weekly programs were specials (9 out of 10)
Problem: Canadian broadcast dramas and comedies suck. (sitcoms etc.)
American success has to do with the size of their own domestic market
o They are able to sell their shows in mass at discounted prices
o It’s cheaper for CTV to buy the rights to the big bang theory than a produce its own comedy
to comparable degree
o These American shows also have built in promotional mechanisms via American
entertainment industry
This isn’t a failure of Canadian TV: for one the comedy and drama is just one sector/aspect,
also we are not competing against an equivalent competitor, America with its sheer size,
volume, mass production is able to overpower us on an international level
Our “failure” is purely attitudinal
2.
Concentration of Ownership
o Almost all Canadian TV channels in the hands of Shaw, Quebecor, Bell and Rogers
o Oligopoly problem
Third party Television platforms like Netflix, online streaming, iTunes will alter the revenue and
structure of TV production and distribution industry in Canada
o Cable chord cutting freak out

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CRI 100 10/03/16
Week 4 - Readings
Contrary:
Eg.
Shaw cable company gives millions to CMF (Canadian media fund) who distributes it to
broadcasters (many which are owned by Shaw) so the money goes back to Shaw, these
companies get money from cable subscribers and from broadcasting channels, and therefore
have power to dictate production
Documentary production has decreased because broadcasters have commissioned less of its
production
3.
Cord cutting freak out
– alternative platforms such as Netflix and online streaming and taking
television industry revenue
These third party screens don’t always have advertisements: where the television industry
makes their $$
Netflix has over 1 million Canadian subscribers
o 4 out of 5 Netflix subscribers also have cable or satellite, with no plans to cut cable
Film in Canada
American films, filmed in Canada often use Canadian service workers (set design, production
etc.)
The expansion and success of the Canadian service sector is not correlated to the Canadian
dollar
International co-production
o Canada has treaties with over 50 countries
o This allows producers in two or more nations to pool their creative and economic
resources and to take full advantage of industrial incentives by their own national
governments, as if the co-production were a national production
o Provide opportunities for much larger budgets and creative collaboration
o However, they work against a truly national cinema
Contrary:
Co-production is not a requirement just an option
Scripts and movies are often international texts to begin with, so it is valuable to collaborate
with an international production team
Easier access to foreign markets for Canadian
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CRI 100 10/03/16
Week 4 - Readings
Shifting our attitude and perception of failure
Very few minor national cinemas even attempt to compete with Hollywood
Proximity, language, and a small domestic market are all hurdles Canadian cinema faces
We need to shift our goalposts of success
Chapter 2: Sound Recording and Radio
Radio broadcasting and sound recording “closely interrelated”
Sound recording industry supplied the bulk of radio broadcasters’ programming – helping
sound recording receive promotional benefits
Music takes up over three quarters of Canadian radio programming
Revenue from record sales have declined but radio is the largest single source of music
derived revenue globally
Sound recording used to be the center of the music industry
CIRPA changed to CRIA (Canadian independent record production association to Canadian
independent music association
Once dominant source of revenue is in decline
Government policy plays a large role in both industries
The Music Industry
For performers, Canadian musicians appear to be thriving
None of the famous Canadian musicians we know are signed to Canadian record labels (JB,
drake, arcade fire, Neil young)
The development of their career have very little to do with Canadian based industry
You do not a Canadian music industry to have Canadian artists
Music industry in Canada is engaged in selling internationally successful artists to Canadians
Canada is integrated into the global music industry
An Industry in Crisis?
Digital technologies – have triggered turmoil in music industry
Revenues from sound recording have declined but revenues from music publishing have
remained stable
Why have sales declined?
Consumers downloading unauthorized music files online
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