Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Criminology (124)
CRM 102 (29)
Chapter 5

CRM102 - Chapter Five.docx

6 Pages
91 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM 102
Professor
Gerardina Tota
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter Five: Choice Theory choice theory: the view that delinquent behaviour is a rational choice made by a  motivated offender who perceives the chances of gain as out­weighing any perceived  punishment or loss. classical criminology: the theory that people have free will, choose to commit crime for  reasons of greed or need, and can be controlled only by the fear of criminal sanctions.  Basic Concepts for Classical Criminology: ­ People choose all behaviour, including crime. ­ A violation of another person is a violation of the social contract. ­ Society must provide the greatest good for the greatest number. ­ The law shouldn’t try to legislate morality. ­ People should be presumed innocent until proven guilty, with no torture. ­ Laws should be written out with punishments prescribed in advance. ­ Individuals give up some of their liberty in exchange for social protection. ­ People are motivated by pain and pleasure. ­ Punishment should be limited to what is necessary to deter people from crime. ­ Punishment should be severe, certain, and swift. ­ The law must be rational, transparent, and just, or is itself a crime. ­ People’s choices can be controlled by the fear of punishment. ­ Beccaria believed that punishment should be proportional to the crimes, otherwise  people would not be deterred. He also saw people as self centered and needing to be  guided by the fear of punishment.  utalitarianism: a view that believes punishment of crime should be balanced and fair,  and that even criminal behaviour should be seen as purposeful and reasonable. Punishment has four main objectives: ­ To prevent all criminal offences ­ To convince the offender to commit the least serious crime possible ­ To ensure that a criminal uses no more force than is necessary ­ To prevent crime as cheaply as possible James Q. Wilson – debunked the idea that crime is caused by poverty and can be altered  by government programs. According to him, those people that are likely to commit crime  lack inhibition against misconduct, value the excitement of breaking the law, have a low  stake in conformity, and are willing to take greater chances than the average person.  ­ Rational offenders are induced to commit crime if they perceive that crime pays more  than they could earn from a legitimate job. Stats: Low rate burglars earn 32% of what  they would at a normal job. High­rate burglars earn about the same as a normal job, but  spend more time behind bars. The idea of a “big score” is an influence in committing  crime. Crime profits are reduced by the costs of a criminal career. Criminals recognize  that eventually everyone gets caught, but only view the short­term impulse and believe  they will get away with each individual crime.  Concepts of Rational Choice ­ Law violating behaviour occurs when an offender decides to commit crime after  considering both personal factors and situational factors. The reasoning criminal  evaluates the risk of apprehension, the seriousness of expected punishment, the potential  value of the criminal enterprise and the need for criminal gain. Offence and Offender Specifications crime displacement: an effect of crime prevention efforts, in which efforts to control  crime in one area shift illegal activities to another area. offence specific crime: an illegal act committed by offenders reaction selectively to  characteristics of particular offences, assessing opportunity and guardianship, relevant to  routine activities theory offender specific crime: an illegal act committed by offenders who do not usually  engage in random acts of antisocial behaviour, but who evaluate their skill at  accomplishing the crime. They analyze whether they have the appropriate skills, motives,  needs, and fears. Criminal acts may be ruled out if offenders think they can reach a  desired goal through legitimate means or if they are too afraid of getting caught.  crime vs. criminality: crime is an event, criminality is a personal trait. criminals do not  commit crime all the time, and even honest citizens can violate the law.  Structuring Criminality Offenders are more likely to desist from crime if they believe that (1) their future criminal  earnings will be relatively low and (2) attractive and legal income­generating  opportunities are available.  The decision to commit crime is structured by: (1) choice of location (2) target  characteristics (3) the techniques available for its completion.  Rational Choice and Routine Activities rational choice theory: the view that crime is a function of a decision making process in  which the potential offender weighs the potential costs and benefits of an illegal act. routine activities theory: the view that crime is a normal function of routine activities of  modern living, offences occur when a suitable target is not protected by capable  guardians. suitable targets: perception of target vulnerability. (unlocked bike) capable  guardians: victims who are perceived to be armed and potentially dangerous. (to a lesser  degree, security fences or burglary alarms) macro perspective: a large scale value that takes into account social and economic  reasons to explain how and why things happen; relevant to Marxism and functionalism.  micro­perspective: a small scale view of events, looking at interaction to explain how  and why things happen; relevant to interactionist studies of deviance and development. motivated criminals: crime rates correspond to the number of motivated criminals in the  population. rational offenders are less likely to commit crimes if they can achieve goals  through legitimate means. job availability reduces crime, in essence. criminal motivation  rises when the cost of living rises. can be reduced if offenders perceive alternatives to  crime.  interactive effects: motivated criminals will not commit crime unless they have suitable  targets and the opportunity to exploit them. the presence of guardians will deter most  offenders, rendering attractive targets off limits. teenage boys have the highest crime  rates, they are most likely to engage in unsupervised socializing. mapping: crime is predictable and can be mapped as it is a rational choice. instrumental crime: illegal activity, such as the sale of narcotics, is committed for the  purpose of obtaining desired goods that are unable to be attained through conventional  means.  seductions of crime: According to Katz, the visceral and emotional appeal that the  situation of crime has for those who engage in illegal acts.  Crime Control Strategies Based on Rational Choice Situational Crime Prevention:  ­ deny the access of motivated offenders to suitable targets ­ home security systems signals guardianship ­ problems are the extinction of the effect and displacem
More Less

Related notes for CRM 102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit