Textbook Notes (359,268)
Canada (156,147)
Criminology (120)
CRM 102 (29)
Chapter

CRM102 - Chapter Seven.docx

4 Pages
104 Views
Unlock Document

School
Ryerson University
Department
Criminology
Course
CRM 102
Professor
Gerardina Tota
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter Seven: Social Structure Theories natural areas: zones or neighbourhoods with shared characteristics that develop as a  result of social forces operating in urban areas, some become natural areas for crime. Chicago school: pioneering resethch on the social ecology of the city and study of urban  crime developed in the early 20  century by colleagues in sociology at the University of  Chicago. culture of poverty: the separate culture formed by the lower class, characterized by  values and norms that are in conflict with conventional society; the culture is self­ maintaining and ongoing. underclass:  a world described by Gunnar Myrdal as being cut off from society, its  members lacking the education and skills needed to survive, the culture becomes a  breeding ground for criminality. Unemployment and Crime • If people do not hold jobs, they are more likely to turn to crime as a means of  support. social structure theory: an approach that looks at the effects of class stratification in  society. Social Disorganization Theory: • Focused on conditions in the environment • Deteriorated neighbourhoods • Inadequate social control  • Law­violating gangs and groups • Conflicting social values transitional neighbourhoods: an area undergoing a shift in population and structure,  usually from middle­class residential to lower­class mixed use. (Chicago) cultural transmission: the passing down of conduct norms from one generation to the  next, which become stable and predictable within the boundaries of a culture.  value conflict: the clash of deviant values of teenage law­violating groups, an element of  youthful misbehaviour, with middle­class norms, which demand obedience to the law.  siege mentality: a consequence and symptom of community disorganization, where fear  causes the belief that the outside world is an enemy out to destroy the neighbourhood.  concentration effect: the outcome when middle class families flee inner­city poverty  areas, taking with them institutional resources and support, which leads to the most  disadvantaged people being consolidated in urban ghettos.  income inequality: the differences in personal income that create structural inequalities  in society, which may be at the root of crime.  collective efficacy: communities that are cohesive and maintain high levels of social  control. a mutual trust and willingness to intervene in the supervision of children and the  maintenance of public order. three forms of collective efficacy: • informal social control: primary level, involves peers, families, and relatives  exerting both positive and negative reinforcement for behaviours. • institutional   social   controls:   child   involvement   with   conventional   social  institutions such as school, church, etc. • public social control: stable neighbourhoods are able to secure external resources  and are better able to reduce the effects of disorganization and maintain lower  levels of crime and victimimization.  at­risk: the susceptibility of people to criminal activity, often as a result of a ‘culture of  poverty’ that is passed from one generation to the next; marked by apathy, cynicism, and  mistrust of social institutions.  Strain Theory • Focuses on conflict between goals and means • Unequal distribution of wealth and power • Frustration • Alternative methods of achievement • Unable to achieve societal social and economic goals through legitimate means anomie theory: occurs when norms of behaviour are broken down during periods of  rapid social change. most likely to occur in societies that are moving from a pre­industrial  model held together by traditions, shared values, and unquestio
More Less

Related notes for CRM 102

Log In


OR

Don't have an account?

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.

Submit