Textbook Notes (368,117)
Canada (161,660)
Criminology (124)
CRM 102 (29)
Chapter

CRM102 - Chapter Eight.docx

4 Pages
44 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Criminology
Course
CRM 102
Professor
Gerardina Tota
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter Eight: Social Process Theories social process theories: approaches that look at the operation of formal and informal  social institutions, such as socialization within family, peer groups, schools, and legal  system. socialization: the process of human development and enculturation. primary socialization  takes place in the family, and secondary socialization takes place in institutions.  stigmatize: to create an enduring label that taints a person’s identity and changes him or  her in the eyes of others. social learning theory:  the view that behaviour is modeled through observation of  human interactions, either directly from observing others or indirectly through the media.  rewarded interactions are copied, punished interactions are avoided. control theory: an approach that looks at the ability of society and its institutions to  control, manage, restrain, or direct human behaviour.  labelling theory:  the view that society creates deviance through the designation of  individual behaviour as deviant. the stigmatized individual feels unwanted and accepts  the label as his identity.  Differential Association Theory: the principle that criminal acts are related to a person’s  exposure to an excess amount of antisocial attitudes and values. • Cime is learned in the same manner as any other behaviour • Crime is learned in interaction with other persons • Learning deviance occurs within intimate personal groups • Learning deviance includes learning the techniques for committing crimes as well  as the motives • People who come into contact with others who maintain different views on  whether to obey the legal code. • Criminal perceives more benefits than unfavourable consequences to violating the  law • Vary in frequency, duration, priority, and intensity. • Learning definitions favourable to criminality produces illegal behaviour because  the motives for criminal behaviour are not the same as those for conventional  behaviour.  differential reinforcement theory: in social learning theory, the view that crime is a  type   of   learned   behaviour,   combining   differential   association   with   elements   of  psychological learning.  neutralization theory: an approach holds that offenders adhere to conventional values  while drifting into periods of illegal behaviour by neutralizing legal and moral values. subterranean values: in neutralization theory, the morally tinged influences that become  entrenched in the culture but are publicly condemned by conventional members of  society. drift:  the movement of youth in and out of delinquency because their lifestyles can  embrace both conventional and deviant values. techniques of neutralization: strategies used by deviants to counteract moral constraints  so that they may drift into criminal acts; a cognitive dissonance strategy.  • Deny responsibility: offenders claim their unlawful acts were not their control but  resulted from forces beyond their control. • Deny injury: stealing is considered as borrowing, etc. • Deny the victim: the victim of the crime ‘had it coming’ which makes it morally  acceptable. • Condemn of the condemners: the world is a corrupt place with a dog­eat­dog  code. • Appeal to higher loyalties: novice criminals argue they are caught in the dilemma  of being loyal to their own peer group vs. abiding by societal rules.  Five Additional Techniques: • The defense of necessity • The metaphor of the ledger: good qualities make up for an illegal instance. • The denial of the necessity of the law: the law is not fair or just. • The claim that everyone else is doing it • The claim of entitlement: entitled to the gains of a crime.  commitment to conformity: a positive orientation to the rules of society, whereby the  individual internalizes those rules. self­rejection:  the consequence of successfully being labeled, whereby the negative  stigma is internalized.  conta
More Less

Related notes for CRM 102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit