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Chapter 3

FSN 707 Chapter Notes - Chapter 3: Content Clause, Google Scholar, Library Catalog


Department
Fashion
Course Code
FSN 707
Professor
Sandra Tullio Pow
Chapter
3

This preview shows pages 1-2. to view the full 6 pages of the document.
The Craft of Research
Chapter 3: From Topics to Questions
-
Research begins with a mental itch about a small question that
only a single researcher wants to scratch
-
Does the answer to your question solve a problem significant to
some community of researchers? Or to a public whose lives your
research could change
Question or Problem?
-
Some questions raise problems
-
A question raises a problem if not answer it keeps us from
knowing something more important
-
A question does not raise a problem if not answering it has no
apparent consequences.
From an Interest to a Topic
-
A research topic is an interest stated specifically enough for you to
imagine becoming a local expert on
-
Start with what interests you most
What interests me about this top?
What would interest others?
Finding a Topic in a Writing Course
List as many interests as you can that you'd like to explore
§
Don't limit yourself to what you think might interest
others
§
Let the ideas flow
In the library
§
Look up your topic in a general guide
§
Use online data bases
On the internet
§Google your topic
§Read the entry on your general topic
§Copy the references and dig deeper
§Find ideas on blogs
§Narrow aspects of the bigger issue
§Skim recent articles
Finding a Topic for a First Research Project in a Particular Field
Start by listing topics relevant to your particular class and
that interests you
Narrow them into one or two promising ones
Skim encyclopedia entries online and in the library
Skim headings in specialized indexes
§Use subheadings for ideas of how others have
narrowed your topic
Google your topic
§Use Google Scholar - for scholarly journals and books
Finding a Topic for an Advanced Project
Most advanced students already have interests in topics
relevant to their field
Find what interests other researchers
§Look online for recurring issues and debates in the
archives
§Search online and in journals
Skim the latest issues of journals in your field, not just for
articles, but also for conference announcements, calls for
papers, and reviews
Investigate the resources that your library is particularly rich
in
From a Broad Topic To A Focused One
Settle on a topic so broad that it could be a subheading in a library
catalog
-
Add words of phrases to narrow down
-
*Don't narrow your topic so much that you can't find information
on it*
-
From a Focused Topic to Questions
The best way to begin working on your focused topic is to
formulate questions that direct you to just information you need
to answer them
-
Start with who, what, when, and where, but focus on how and why
-
Systematically ask questions about your topic's history,
composition, and categories
-
Record all questions, but don't stop to answer them
-
Ask about the History of your Topic
How does it fit into a larger developmental context?
§Why did you topic come into being?
What is its own internal history?
§How and why has the topic itself changed through
time?
Ask about its Structure and Composition
How does your topic fit into the context of a larger
structure or function as part of a larger ecosystem?
How do its parts fit together as a system?
Ask How Your Topic is Categorized
How can your topic be grouped into kinds?
How does your topic compare to and contrast with others
like it?
Ask What If? And Other Speculative Questions
How would things be different if your topic never existed,
disappeared or were put into a new context?
Ask Questions Suggested by Your Sources
Ask questions that build on agreement
§If a source makes a claim you think is persuasive, ask
questions that might extend its reach
§Ask questions that might support the same claim with
new evidence
§Ask questions analogous to those that sources have
asked about similar topics
Ask questions that reflect disagreement
Look for questions other researchers as but don't answer
Record questions that spark your interest
Evaluate Your Questions
Look for questions whose answer might make you think
about your topic in a new way
Avoid questions like:
§Their answer are settled fact hat you could just look
up
Questions that ask how and why invite deeper
thinking than who, what, when or where
Deeper thinking leads to more interesting
answers
§Their answers would be merely speculative
If you can't imagine finding hard data that might
settle the question, it’s a question you can't
settle
§Their answers are dead ends
It is hard to see how an answer would help us
think about any larger issue worth
understanding better - so it’s a question that
probably not worth asking
The Most Significant Question: So What?
-What will be lost if you don’t answer your question?
-How will not answering it keep us from understanding something
else better than we do?
Step 1: Name Your Topic
Fill in the blank with your topic, using some of those nouns
derived from verbs
(1) I am trying to learn about/working on/studying
________
Step 2: Add an Indirect Question
Add an indirect question that indicates what you do not
know or understand about your topic
(1) I am studying _______
(2) Because I want to find out
who/what/when/where/whether/why/how
______
When you add because, you state why you are pursuing
your topic: to answer a question important to you
Step 3: Answer So What? By Motivating Your Questions
Add a second indirect question that explains why you asked
your first question
(1) I am working on _______
(2) Because I want to find out whether ______
(3) In order to help my read understand
how, why or whether
WEEK 3 -Readings -Booth
Sunday, September 16, 2018

Only pages 1-2 are available for preview. Some parts have been intentionally blurred.

The Craft of Research
Chapter 3: From Topics to Questions
-Research begins with a mental itch about a small question that
only a single researcher wants to scratch
-Does the answer to your question solve a problem significant to
some community of researchers? Or to a public whose lives your
research could change
Question or Problem?
-Some questions raise problems
-A question raises a problem if not answer it keeps us from
knowing something more important
-A question does not raise a problem if not answering it has no
apparent consequences.
From an Interest to a Topic
-A research topic is an interest stated specifically enough for you to
imagine becoming a local expert on
-Start with what interests you most
What interests me about this top?
What would interest others?
Finding a Topic in a Writing Course
List as many interests as you can that you'd like to explore
§Don't limit yourself to what you think might interest
others
§Let the ideas flow
In the library
§Look up your topic in a general guide
§Use online data bases
On the internet
§
Google your topic
§
Read the entry on your general topic
§
Copy the references and dig deeper
§
Find ideas on blogs
§
Narrow aspects of the bigger issue
§
Skim recent articles
Finding a Topic for a First Research Project in a Particular Field
Start by listing topics relevant to your particular class and
that interests you
Narrow them into one or two promising ones
Skim encyclopedia entries online and in the library
Skim headings in specialized indexes
§
Use subheadings for ideas of how others have
narrowed your topic
Google your topic
§
Use Google Scholar - for scholarly journals and books
Finding a Topic for an Advanced Project
Most advanced students already have interests in topics
relevant to their field
Find what interests other researchers
§
Look online for recurring issues and debates in the
archives
§
Search online and in journals
Skim the latest issues of journals in your field, not just for
articles, but also for conference announcements, calls for
papers, and reviews
Investigate the resources that your library is particularly rich
in
From a Broad Topic To A Focused One
Settle on a topic so broad that it could be a subheading in a library
catalog
-
Add words of phrases to narrow down
-
*Don't narrow your topic so much that you can't find information
on it*
-
From a Focused Topic to Questions
The best way to begin working on your focused topic is to
formulate questions that direct you to just information you need
to answer them
-
Start with who, what, when, and where, but focus on how and why
-
Systematically ask questions about your topic's history,
composition, and categories
-
Record all questions, but don't stop to answer them
-
Ask about the History of your Topic
How does it fit into a larger developmental context?
§Why did you topic come into being?
What is its own internal history?
§How and why has the topic itself changed through
time?
Ask about its Structure and Composition
How does your topic fit into the context of a larger
structure or function as part of a larger ecosystem?
How do its parts fit together as a system?
Ask How Your Topic is Categorized
How can your topic be grouped into kinds?
How does your topic compare to and contrast with others
like it?
Ask What If? And Other Speculative Questions
How would things be different if your topic never existed,
disappeared or were put into a new context?
Ask Questions Suggested by Your Sources
Ask questions that build on agreement
§If a source makes a claim you think is persuasive, ask
questions that might extend its reach
§Ask questions that might support the same claim with
new evidence
§Ask questions analogous to those that sources have
asked about similar topics
Ask questions that reflect disagreement
Look for questions other researchers as but don't answer
Record questions that spark your interest
Evaluate Your Questions
Look for questions whose answer might make you think
about your topic in a new way
Avoid questions like:
§Their answer are settled fact hat you could just look
up
Questions that ask how and why invite deeper
thinking than who, what, when or where
Deeper thinking leads to more interesting
answers
§Their answers would be merely speculative
If you can't imagine finding hard data that might
settle the question, it’s a question you can't
settle
§Their answers are dead ends
It is hard to see how an answer would help us
think about any larger issue worth
understanding better - so it’s a question that
probably not worth asking
The Most Significant Question: So What?
-What will be lost if you don’t answer your question?
-How will not answering it keep us from understanding something
else better than we do?
Step 1: Name Your Topic
Fill in the blank with your topic, using some of those nouns
derived from verbs
(1) I am trying to learn about/working on/studying
________
Step 2: Add an Indirect Question
Add an indirect question that indicates what you do not
know or understand about your topic
(1) I am studying _______
(2) Because I want to find out
who/what/when/where/whether/why/how
______
When you add because, you state why you are pursuing
your topic: to answer a question important to you
Step 3: Answer So What? By Motivating Your Questions
Add a second indirect question that explains why you asked
your first question
(1) I am working on _______
(2) Because I want to find out whether ______
(3) In order to help my read understand
how, why or whether
WEEK 3 -Readings -Booth
Sunday, September 16, 2018 3:57 PM
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