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Chapter 4

GMS 802 Chapter Notes - Chapter 4: Relativism, Sweatshop, Foreign Corrupt Practices Act


Department
Global Management Studies
Course Code
GMS 802
Professor
Jian Guan
Chapter
4

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CHAPTER 4: BUSINESS ETHICS IN A GLOBAL
MARKETPLACE
Introduction
If running a responsible business is already dicult within one’s own
borders because of all the problems and challenges one faces on a
daily basis, it becomes that much harder when the marketplace
becomes global
Whatever decision is made will be met by stakeholders with opposing
views and perspectives from various cultures that may not be
understood, but which compete for attention and consideration
Friedman suggests the globalism phenomenon and highlights the
benets of it: wider selection of inexpensive goods/services, increased
material prosperity, and closer cooperation and connection among
people across the globe
oGlobalism is in part a recognition that the barriers to connection
with others (physical distance, cultural di$erences, legal
structures) have largely disappeared, and those that exist are
shrinking in comparison to the things that allow us to connect
(internet, transportation, global trade networks)
Globalism is inevitable—it is a juggernaut, it is already embedded in
the fabric of our world, and it is becoming extremely dicult for others
not to participate
Barber argues the corrosive e$ect that global markets have on local
culture
The result of globalism is the proliferation of two opposing identities,
both of which are unpalatable for Barber: entrenched splinter groups
discontent with globalism (“jihad”) and those who embrace globalism
with an unhealthy vigor (“McWorld”)
In the quest for global branding and eciency, companies shape local
culture and identity in ways that leave little room for business to thrive
without eroding what is unique and distinctive about those cultures
Barber notes that the quest to be di$erent takes on a pathological
quality in the context of a global economy shaped by McWorld
One cannot simply coexist with McWorld because it is pervasive,
uncompromising, and expansionist
Globalism may be an inherent part of the emerging business
landscape, but its growing reach raises widespread concerns that
directly impact business
A Look At Some Recurring Ethical Problems In Global Business
Corruption is used to refer to either bribery or extortion
oIn a bribe, the payer of the bribe o$ers it to the other party
oIn extortion, the receiver of the payment demands the payment
from the payer
According to Transparency International, “political corruption points not
only to a lack of transparency, but also to related concerns about
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