Textbook Notes (367,969)
Canada (161,538)
LAW 122 (618)
Chapter

Chapter Eight.docx

5 Pages
60 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law and Business
Course
LAW 122
Professor
Theresa Miedema
Semester
Winter

Description
CHAPTER 8 Consideration • The main goal of contract law is to enforce bargains • Mutual exchange of value must occur  Gratuitous Promise: promise for which nothing of legal value is given in exchange. • While you are entitled to keep something if I give it to you, you cannot FORCE  me to give it to you because we didn’t have a bargain so we don’t have a contract.  Consideration: exists when a party either gives (or promises to give) a benefit to  someone or suffers (or promises to suffer) a detriment to itself. • MUST be provided by both parties.  • We do not have to promise to provide a benefit to each other we can promise to  provide a benefit to someone else.  Sufficient and Adequate Consideration • It may be anything of value • Love and affection are not enough • Consideration must be SUFFICIENT but doesn’t have to be ADEQUATE • There only has to be SOME value (peppercorn theory)  Forbearance to Sue • A promise to not pursue a lawsuit if something happens.  Past Consideration Mutuality of Consideration: requires that each party provide consideration IN RETURN  for the other parties.  Past Consideration: Consists of something that a party did prior to the completion on a  contract. • This is not given in EXCHANGE so there is no mutuality.  • If you make an initial request and the promise to pay after it is done, the courts  will say that a reasonable person would have viewed your initial offer as  consideration.  o They would say that there was sufficient meeting of the minds and would  require you to pay a reasonable price. Pre­Existing Obligation • An obligation that existed, but was not actually performed, before the contract  was contemplated.  o PRE EXISTING PUBLIC DUTY  Not good consideration.  They cannot use their pre­existing duty as consideration for a new  contract.   If it’s after hours they can do whatever they want. o PRE EXISTING CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS OWED TO A  THIRD PARTY  Good consideration for a new party o PRE EXISTING CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATION OWED TO SAME  PARTY  Not good consideration  The same person cannot be required to pay twice for the same  benefit.   They can use novation to discharge their initial contract and enter  into a new agreement   They can agree to do something new.  Third they can place it under a seal.  Promise to Forgive an Existing Debt • RENT EXAMPLE: your promise to accept the lesser amount can only be  enforceable if it was supported by fresh consideration. • This means that I must give you something new. They fact that I am paying a new  amount is merely PART PERFORMANCE., but a different type of payment  would work. • A promise to accept a smaller amount is enforceable is placed under a seal.  • Enforceable if the debtor gives something in exchange for it. For example the  different payment type of giving you something else of value along with my  smaller payment.  • MERCANTILE LAW AMENDMENT ACT OF ONTARIO (PAGE 184  BOTTOM)  o IT requires part performance­ I must at least pay that lesser sum o Will not allow it to be used in an uncounsiacable manner (if I have the full  amount and I know you are desperate but I only pay you the lesser  amount)  Promises Enforceable WITHOUT Consideration 1. SEALS a. A mark that is put on a written contract to indicate a party’s intention to be  bound by the terms of that document, even though the other party may not  have given consideration.  b. This may be agreeing to do something for nothing!! c. Banks use this when they give you loans etc. d. Usually it is just enough to write “seal” on the paper and the courts can  insist that the party sign the contract when it is written.  e. It is NOT sufficient to use a form that already has the word SEAL written  on it.  f. It is NOT sufficient to add the word “seal” after the party has signed and  left. 2. PROMISSORY ESTOPPEL a. ESTOPPEL: A rule that precludes a person from disputing or retracting a  statement that they made earlier.  b. “Estopped” from unfairly denying the truth of a prior statement if the  person to whom it was told relied on 
More Less

Related notes for LAW 122

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit