Textbook Notes (367,936)
Canada (161,516)
LAW 122 (618)
Chapter 4

law 122 chapter 4

4 Pages
34 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law and Business
Course
LAW 122
Professor
Christos Shiamptanis
Semester
Fall

Description
Law 122 Chapter 6 • Tort of negligence: Determines whether the defendant can be held liable for  carelessly causing injury to the plaintiff. The tort of negligence requires the  plaintiff to prove that the defendant:  ­ Owed a duty of care, in that it was required to act carefully toward the  plaintiff.  ­ Breached the standard of care by acting carelessly  ­ Caused harm to the plaintiff.  Even if the plaintiff shows those three elements, the defendant may be able to avoid  liability by proving a defence. The defendant may show that the plaintiff  ­ was guilty of contributory negligence that caused or contributed to the injury.  ­ Voluntarily assumed the risk of being injured by the defendant.  ­ Was injured while engaged in some form of illegal behavior.  Duty of Care  • Duty of care: Exists if the defendant is required to use reasonable care to avoid  injuring the plaintiff.  • The questions in order to determine whether or not a duty of care should  exist.  ­ Was it reasonably foreseeable that the plaintiff could be injured by the  defendants carelessness?  ­ Did the parties share a relationship of sufficient proximity?  ­ If an injury was easily foreseeable, and if the parties shared a relationship of  sufficient proximity, then a duty of care presumably will exist. The judge  might still deny a duty of care, however on the basis of policy reasons.  • Reasonable Foreseeability  ­ This issue is not whether the defendant personally knew that its activities  might injure the plaintiff. It is whether a reasonable person in the defendants  position would have recognized that possibility.  • Proximity  ­ There must be a close and direct connection between the parties.  ­ The court will look at the issue of proximity from a variety of perspectives.  Depending on circumstances it may ask:   Whether the parties shared a social relationship (ex: a parent is  required to look after a child but a stranger is not).   Whether the parties shared a commercial relationship ( ex: a tavern  may be responsible if a drunken customer later causes a traffic  accident, but the host of a house party may not be responsible if a  drunken guest injures a pedestrian on the way home).   Whether there was a direct casual connection between the defendants  carelessness and the plaintiff’s injury ( for example, a motorist who  rams into a bridge will be liable for the damage of to the bridge, but  prob not for the profits that were lost when customers could not reach  a store that was located on the other side of the bridge).   Whether the plaintiff relied on the fact that the defendant represented  that it would act in a certain way ( for example a railway company  have a duty to continue operating a safety gate that it voluntarily  installed and that pedestrians have come to rely upon).  • Policy ­ Proximity deals with relationships that exist between the parties, whereas  policy is concerned with the effect that a duty of care would have on the legal  system and on society generally.  ­ For example, a court may ask whether the recognition of a duty of care would:   “open the floodgates” by encouraging a very large number of people to  swamp the courts with lawsuits (that is one reason why the courts are  reluctant to recognize a duty of care for negligent statements).   Interference with political decisions (that is why a government may be  able to escape responsibility for decididing that it could not afford to  frequently check a stretch of road for fallen trees)   Hurt a valuable type of relationship (that is one reason why a mother  does not owe a duty of care to her unborn child).  Breach of the Standard of Care  • The first element of the cause of action in negligence requires the plaintiff to  prove that the defendant owed a duty of care. The second element requires that  the plaintiff prove that the defendant breached the standard of care.  • Standard of care: Tells the defendant how it should act.  • The standard of care is breached when the defendant acts less carefully.  • The reasonable person test requires the defendant to act in the same way that a  reasonable person would act in similar circumstances.   • Some important factors in a reasonable person test:  ­ Reasonable person test is said to be objective. It does not make allowance for  the defendants subjective, or personal, characteristics.  ­ The reasonable person takes precautions against reasonably forseeable risks.  ­ The reasonable person is influenced by both the likelihood of harm and the  potential severity of harm. Greater care is required if the potentional for harm  is 90 percent.  ­ The reasonable person is more likely to adopt affordable precautions. Ex a taxi  driver that regularily carries young children should pay 50 dollars for tamper  prop lock doors.  ­ The reasonable person may act
More Less

Related notes for LAW 122

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit