Textbook Notes (368,125)
Canada (161,663)
LAW 122 (618)
Chapter 7

law 122 chapter 7

5 Pages
76 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Law and Business
Course
LAW 122
Professor
Christos Shiamptanis
Semester
Fall

Description
Law Chapter 5: Miscellaneous Torts Affecting Business  • Conspiracy: Usually occurs when two or more defendants agree to act together  with the primary purpose of causing the plaintiff to suffer a financial loss.  • Intimidation: Occurs when the plaintiff suffers a loss as a result of the  defendant’s threat to commit an unlawful act against either the plaintiff or a third  party.  ­ Two party intimidation: occurs when defendant directly coerces the plaintiff  into suffering a loss.  ­ Three party intimidation: occurs when the defendant coerces a third party  into acting in a way that hurts the plaintiff.  Interference with Contractual Relations  • Interference with contractual relations: Occurs when the defendant disrupts a  contract that exists between the plaintiff and the third party.  • A direct inducement to breach of contract: Occurs when the defendant directly  persuades a third party to break its contract with the plaintiff.  ­ First­ The defendant must know about the contract that the contract exists  between the third party and the plaintiff.  ­ Second­ The defendant must intend to cause the third party to brach that  contract.  ­ Fourth­  The plaintiff must have suffered a loss as a result of the defentants  conduct.  • Indirect inducement to breach of contract: Occurs when the defendant  indirectly persuades a third party to break its contract with the plaintiff.  Unlawful Interference with Economic Relations • Unlawful interference with economic relations: May occur if the defendant  commits a unlawful act for the purpose of causing the plaintiff to suffer an  economic loss.  ­ defendants act must be directed at the plaintiff but hurting plaintiff need not be  defendants primary purpose.  Deceit  • Deceit: Occurs if the defendant makes a false statement, which it knows to be  untrue, with which it intends to mislead the plaintiff, and which causes the  plaintiff to suffer a loss.  • The defendant may be held liable for a half truth  • The defendant may be held liable for failing to update information.  • Business people must not only avoid lying: they must avoid creating the wrong  perception  • The defendant must know at the time of making a statement, that it is false.  • The defendant must make the statement with the intention of misleading the  plaintiff.  • The plaintiff must suffer a loss as a result of reasonably relying upon the  defendants statement.  Occupiers Liability  • Occupiers liability: Requires and occupier of premises to protect visitors  form harm.  • Occupier: Any person who has substantial control over premises.  • Visitor: Any person who enters onto premises  • Premises: Include more than land.  Common Law Rules • It can lump together different types of people. Ex: a burglar who breaks into an  office is a trespasser but so is a child who wanders onto a construction site.  • It is often difficult to distinguish between different catagories.  • A visitors status may change form one moment to the next. Ex: A customer who  refuses a request to leave a store is transferred from an invitee to a trespasser.  • It is often difficult to decide whether a danger is hidden or unusual. Ex does an icy  parking lot during a Canadian winter satisfy either requirement?  • Because of difficulties, the juristictions that still use common law rules have  modified them.  • Now an occupier must do more than simply refrain from intentionally or  recklessly hurting the trespasser. The occupiers obligations are determined by a  number of factors, including:  ­ The age of the trespasser  ­ The reason for the trespass  ­ The nature of the danger that caused the injury  ­ The occupiers knowledge of that danger  ­ The occupiers cost of removing that danger.  • Licensees and invitees are now generally treated the same. An occupier must  protect them both from unusual dangers. Previously, a licensee was protected  from only hidden dangers.  Statutory Rules  • Because of the problems associated with common law rules, six provinces have  enacted legislation to govern occupiers liability.  • Common law generally only applies to dangers that are created by the condition  of the premises. The legislation also applies to activities that occur on the  premises.  • Also the standard of care no longer depends upon the visitors classification. Nor  are special distinctions drawn between, say, hidden or unusual dangers. An  occupier must use reasonable care, which depends upon a number of factors  including.  ­ the potential danger of the visitor  ­ the occupiers cost of removing the danger  ­ The purpose of the visit  ­ The nature of the premises  • The statutes generally allow an occupier to avoid liability by issuing a warning.  • Under common law, a landlord generally cannot be held liable for injuries that a  person suffers while visiting a tenant. Under legislation a landlord may be held  liable to a visitor if it fails to make repa
More Less

Related notes for LAW 122

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit