Textbook Notes (368,844)
Canada (162,200)
Marketing (884)
MKT 100 (488)
Chapter

MKT Module 4.docx

5 Pages
106 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Marketing
Course
MKT 100
Professor
Margaret Buckby
Semester
Fall

Description
MKT Module 4: Understanding Buyer Behavior    1. Research customers   • The market research process typically includes the following logical steps:  1. Problem Definition/Question to be Answered (the most difficult step)  2. Research Design  3. Data Collection  4. Data Analysis and Interpretation  5. Presentation of Results  • Types of Research   ­ Exploratory research: are undertaken when a problem or research  question is still fuzzy and management wants additional information  before undertaking further research. It is likely to include the study of  internal records, customer complaints, financial analysis trends and  discussion with distributors and suppliers.   ­ Descriptive survey research:  Typically used to describe customers, either  small number of customers in depth or large amount of customers by  survey research. It typically gathers descriptive profiles of customers and  is used to measure customer satisfaction, study product use and segment  customers.  ­ Cause and effect research: Is used to explore the question “Does X cause  Y?” such as the effects of a price decrease on sales and the effect of TV  advertising campaign spending on sales.   2. Qualitative Consumer Research  • Includes methods such as observations and in depth interviews with customers,  suppliers and middlemen. The details of using observational research to  understand how the customer uses the product or service.  • Customer visits  • Focus group research: focus groups are the most common market research method  used today because they are very useful. A focus group consists of a group of 6 to  12 people who focus on a particular question or issue in a free wheeling  discussion for about 2 hours. Often it is also used to test products and product  concepts, advertising creative and political messages.  • Focus groups can be used successfully by following these best practices.  ­ Identify who you want to talk to and the recruit participation.  ­ Choose a moderator who will relate your focus group participants.  ­ Hold a debriefing with the moderator immediately afterwards to obtain her  fresh insights and perspectives.  ­ Note the body language, interest or emotion that accompanies the  discussion.  ­ It is good to have management in attendance, as new questions can be  passed to the moderator in process.  ­ Conduct focus groups until no new insights surface: This sometimes takes  about three to four focus groups, or a lot more.  ­ Take the concept of focus groups a step further and run focus groups with  experts, recruited to participate in high level product development focus  groups.  • The purpose of focus groups is to learn the beliefs, attitudes, preferences and  behavior of the target customers.  3. Survey Customer Research  •  Probability sampling:  A sample where all of the respondents in the population or  segment to be studied have a know (non­zero) chance of being chosen in the  sample from the population/segment being studied.   ­ Simple Random sample: a probability sample where respondents are randomly  chosen from a complete list of the population.  ­ Convenience sample: a sample that is gathered from a convenient pool of  customers or potential customers.  • Sampling problems: The major problems with sampling are the risk of non  response error or participation bias. This occurs when a particular customer group  is overrepresented or underrepresented in a sample.  • Online research: about a third of all consumer market research is now undertaken  online because.  ­ Online market research has increased the quality of the research by  reducing errors in several research processes.  ­ Online market research has significantly reduced the cost of research by  20­50 percent  ­ Online research has sped up the whole market research process, from  taking weeks to days.  ­ Comparative studies suggest that online open minded questions elicit a lot  richer response and less inhibited responses then open ended questions  asked in mail or telephone surveys.  4.  Cultural and Social Influence • Canadian culture  • Drivers of cultural change ­ Openness to foreign ideas is the single most important source of new  technology and skills in development countries.  • The effect of income and time pressure on consumer behavior. Leisure time  management has some significant effects on decision making, particularly on  each of the following.:  ­ Risk taking: If consumers are more harried in their work and family life,  then they are less likely to be novelty seekers and innovators when they  make purchases.  ­ Searching and Shopping: Consumers have developed a series of informal  buying rules to save time but still ensure satisfactory purchases. For  example consumers tend to buy quality brand name products, follow the  advise of friends etc.  ­ Product Expertise: 
More Less

Related notes for MKT 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit