Textbook Notes (368,439)
Canada (161,878)
QMS 102 (49)
Chapter

Session-7.doc

21 Pages
114 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Quantitative Methods
Course
QMS 102
Professor
Changping Wang
Semester
Winter

Description
Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Chapter 6 – Discrete Probability Distributions 6.1. Discrete Probability Distributions Session 7 Page 1 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Session 7 Page 2 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Session 7 Page 3 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Example 1: Toss a fair coin three times. Let X be the number of  heads. Write down the probability distribution of X. Session 7 Page 4 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang        Example 2: At a raffle, 1500 tickets are sold at $2 each for four prizes  of $500, $250, $150, and $75. You buy one ticket. Let X be the value of  your gain. Write down the probability distribution of X. Session 7 Page 5 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Mean (or Expected Value) of a (discrete) random  variable Given a discrete probability distribution X                             x 1      x2            …       xn    … ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ P(X = x )i                     1      p 2           ...      pn    … Then the mean, denoted by E(X), is                                            E(X ) = ∑ xipi i Session 7 Page 6 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Example 3: Roll a fair die. Let X be the number rolled. Then X           P(X) 1            1/6 2            1/6 3            1/6 4            1/6 5            1/6 6            1/6 Find the mean E(X). Session 7 Page 7 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Session 7 Page 8 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang Example 4:  Roll a fair die. Let X be the number rolled. Then X           P(X) 1            1/6 2            1/6 3            1/6 4            1/6 5            1/6 6            1/6 Find the variance  σ 2(or Var(X)) and standard deviation   of X. Note:   We are not interested in showing the use of the formula, since  you can use a CASIO calculator to compute them. Session 7 Page 9 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang For instance, we can put the distribution in a calculator, and treat it as a weighted  data. Then we can find out mean and standard deviation. LIST 1          LIST 2 1                 1/6 2                 1/6 3                 1/6 4                 1/6 5                 1/6 6                 1/6 XLIST:  LIST 1     Freq:  LIST 2 Expected value Decision Making Example 5.7   (Page 232 on the text)   Session 7 Page 10 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang A fast food company plans to install a new ice­cream dispensing unit in  one of two store locations. The company figures that the probability of a  unit being successful in location A is ¾ and the annual profit in this case is  $150,000. If it is not successful, there will be losses of $80,000. At location  B the probability of succeeding is ½, and the potential profit and loss are  $240,000 and $48,000, respectively. a) Where should the company locate to maximize the expected profit? b) Which location is less risky, i.e., has the lower relative variability? Example 7: B. F. Retread, a tire manufacturer, wants to select one of  the   feasible   designs   for   a   new   longer   wearing   radial   tire.   The  manufacturing cost of each type of tire is shown below.  Fixed Cost Variable Cost Tire Design per year  per tire Session 7 Page 11 Business Statistics I Dr. Changping Wang A $60,000  $30 B  $90,000  $20 C $120,000  $15 There are 3 possible levels of annual demand: 5,000 tires, 7,000 tires and  11,000 tires. The respective probabilities are 0.2, 0.4 and 0.4. The selling  prices   for   A,   B   and   C   will   be   $85,   $65   and   $75,   respectively. Question 1 Based on expected profit, which design should be  produced? (a) C      (b) B     (c) A     (d)  A or B      (e)   B  or  C Question 2 What is the expected profit for the design B? a. $372,000         b. $279,000   c.  $313,500      d. $391,000         e. None of these Example 8: If we roll a fair die 3 times, find out the probability that we  will roll a number “1” exactly 2 times. Solution. If we use a triple (a, b, c) to denote an outcome of such  experiment, then it means that we roll a die three times, and we roll  numbers a, b and c at the first, second and third times, respectively. So,  the sample space is  S={(1,1,1), (1,1,2), (1,1,3), (1,1,4), (1,1,5), (1,1,6),      (1,2,1), (1,2,2), (1,2,3), (1,2,4), (1,2,5), (1,2,6), Session 7
More Less

Related notes for QMS 102

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit