Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Sociology (561)
SOC 104 (72)
Chapter

SOC104 General Notes.docx

5 Pages
109 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC 104
Professor
Shavin Malhotra
Semester
Winter

Description
Education  Education in Historical­Global Perspective  ­ Cultural transmissions: process by which children and recent immigrants become  acquainted with the dominant culture believes, values, norms, and knowledge of society. ­ Informal education, learning that occurs in a spontaneous, unplanned way. ­ Formal education is learning that takes place with in academic setting. Where teachers  convey specific knowledge, skills, and thinking process to students  ­Mass education refers to providing free, pubic schooling for wide segments of a nations  population. ­ By 1900’s, mass education had taken hold in Canada. ­ Japan did not make public education mandatory, right away. Once the country  underwent industrializing, education was viewed as a crucial link to economic success in  japan, at this point. Pg. 444 Sociological Perspectives on Education      Functionalist view education as one of the most important components of society ­ Emile Durkheim says education is crucial for promoting social solidarity and  sustainability ­  The 1994 world commission of learning outlined three purposes of schooling,  first, to ensure all students high levels of literacy by building on basic reading,  writing, and problem­solving skills. ­ Second to develop an appreciation of learning the wish to continue learning, and  the ability and commitment to do so and 3rd to prepare students for responsible  citizenship .Pg 444 Manifest Functions of Education, defined as open, stated, and intended goals or  consequence of activities within an organization or institution. In education, these are… ­Socialization   ­Transmission of culture  ­Social control  ­Social placement  ­Change and innovation Pg. 446 Latent Functions of Education. Hidden, unstated, and sometimes unintended  consequences of activities within an organization.  ­Restricting some activities  ­Matchmaking and production of some social networks ­Creation of the generation gap Pg. 447 Conflicts View.  Conflict theorists do not believe that public schools reduce social  inequality in society, they believe that schools often perpetuate class, racial ethnic and  gender inequalities as some groups seek to maintain their privileged position at the  expense of others. ­Bourdieu asserts that students from diverse class backgrounds come to school with  differing amounts of cultural capital­ social assets that include values, beliefs, attitudes,  and competencies in language and culture.  The Hidden Curriculum  ­ Is the transmission of cultural values and attitudes, such as conformity and  obedience to authority, through implied demands found in rules, routines, and  regulations of schools. ­ Educational credentials are extremely important in societies that have emphasize  credentialism­ a process of social selection in which class advantage and social  status are linked to the possession of academic qualifications (Collins,1979:  Marshall, 1998) Pg. 449 Feminist perspectives ­Teachers pay more attention the boys ­ Boys and girls were split up on the playgrounds ­Teachers displayed stereotypical expectations of male and female students aptitudes and  interests ­Ministries of education an eliminated gender bias and stereotyping in schools curriculum  and classroom practices ­In 2006 60% of university graduates were female Symbolic interactionism perspectives ­ Focus on classroom communication partners and education practices that effect students  self­concept and aspirations.  Labeling it and the self­fulfilling prophecy ­Labeling is the process whereby a person is identified by others eyes possessing a  specific characteristic or exhibiting a certain pattern of behavior ­ Self­fulfilling prophecy Defined as an unsubstantiated belief or prediction resulting in  behavior that makes the originally false belief come true. Postmodern perspectives Postmodern theories often highlight differences and irregularity in society Table on Pg 454 has all the key elements of the different Sociological perspectives on  education. LOOK BELOW  Education in the future  Education  in 
More Less

Related notes for SOC 104

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit