Textbook Notes (368,566)
Canada (161,966)
ARCH 100 (26)
Chapter 10

Chapter 10.docx

4 Pages
117 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Archaeology
Course
ARCH 100
Professor
Ross Jamieson
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 10 Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, Kwakiutl, Nu­chah­nulth, Coast Salish Nobles – head of households, controlled resources, directed ceremonial activity Commoners – largest group, free Slaves – acquired thru raids, no status • Leader of household most important, different households ranked within village • Tsimshian had only real chiefdom Ozette:  Washington, 4 houses buried in mudslide, showed how much of life was made of organic  materials.   • Storage of fish would give wealth • Labour force needed for salmon run might have been cause of slavery • To tell if salmon stored look at frequency of cranial bones Locarno Beach Phase: 3,500­2,500  years ago, Seattle to Vancouver  produce low numbers of cranial  bones at sites. Marpole Phase:  2400­1100 years ago. Beginning of inherited status in Gulf of Georgia.  Evidence from  burials of young people and the differences in their burials.   Labrets:  Plugs placed below the lips or on the side of the mouth to display status (Bigger = higher).   Namu:  6 kya.  First evidence of labret wear Pender Canal:  In Locarno phase, found various people wearing them. (Not direct evidence yet) Cranial Deformation:  starts in Marpole  phase, and interesting because it shows that high status was  inherited because it had to be done at a very young age.  Esilao site: Fraser River.  Shows charred  box with designs.  Connection between artwork and social  complexity? McNichol Creek Site:  Prince Rupert.  Showed how houses were connected to status as well.  House O,  thought to be the elite house was large, had a square hearth, large number of artefacts, and mostly  mammal remains as opposed to fish.  Most artefacts were at back (chief), and none at the front (slaves  lived). • Evidence for violence at Namu • Also rock fortifications told by oral history to prevent raiders.   Salisbury Plain:  Where the Stonehenge is Construction of the Stonehenge Phase 1:  5 kya.  Round ditch. Wooden posts in a ring of Aubrey holes on inside of ditch.  Animal bones  in ditch.   Phase 2:  5­4.5 kya.  Ditch/Aubrey holes filled in (some with human remains).  Timber structure near  center.   Phase 3:  4.5­3.5 kya.  Laying of standing stones.  3a:  Set up bluestones (ring of standing stones in the center in Q and R holes).  Stone not native to the  area, but in Wales.  Transported by glaciers or by humans? 3b:  Sandstone blocks on perimeter. Rocks from 30 km away. Rocks put on top and fitted with carved  joints.  Trilithons in five pairs in  Sarsen circle.  Capped by lintels.  3c:  Rearranging Bluestones and digging holes.  Three phases of bluestones being reorganized and holes  dug in circle around the site.  Bluestones on inside of trilithons and between trilithons and sarsen circle.   Avenue:  a path bounded by ditches and embankments for a km between River Avon and Stonehenge.   • Mystery because no domestic remains nearby. Durrington Wall:  first evidence of a village in the Late Neolithic period.  • How did they do this without state organization? • Was there a chiefdom? Did the monument increase as their chiefdom did? • Evidence that people who built the Stonehenge marked elites by ornaments.  Amesbury Archer:  main burial close to Stonehenge.  Corresponded to phase 3.  Wealth of grave goods.   He was from the Alps... how did he gain status? Snaketown:  Hohokam culture in Phoenix Basin has platform mounds and ball courts.  300­600 people  and large scale irrigation.  
More Less

Related notes for ARCH 100

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit