Textbook Notes (368,147)
Canada (161,680)
Psychology (934)
PSYC 221 (62)
Chapter 7

Chapter 7 - knowing

1 Page
102 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 221
Professor
Thomas Spalek
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 7  Friday, February 28, 2014 11:41 PM SEMANTIC MEMORY‐memory for meaning; the long‐term memory component in  which general world knowledge including knowledge of language is stored ‐ thought to be largely similar for all people  THE COLLINS AND QUILLAN AND LOFTUS MODEL  ‐ two important assumptions: the structure of semantic memory; the  process of retrieving information from that structure ‐ semantic memory=network‐ an interrelated set of concepts or interrelated  body of knowledge  ‐ concepts= nodes‐   a point or location in the semantic place  ‐ linked together by pathway‐sc onnecting link between two concepts or  nodes  ‐ every concept is related to every other concept, some are just indirect (long  pathways) ** model limitation: does not explain the typicality eff‐eca ter to verify typical  members of category than atypical members SPREADING ACTIVATION ‐ the mental activity of accessing the meaning of a concept  and retrieving information from this network ‐ once the concept becomes activated, the concept begins to spread activation  to all the other concepts to which it is linked  ‐ spreading activation search not only retrieves the relevant pathway between  two concepts, it also activates related concepts (normally semantic relations) > Proposition‐a relationship between two concepts  ‐ ex. the representation of the meaning of an entire sentence, including all the  relationships among all the words  > Property statemen‐ tsimple statement in which the relationship being expressed is  "X has the property or feature Y" > Isa‐ the superordinate pathway or link; indicates category membership ‐ the reversed direction is not true (ie. all birds are robins) > Intersection‐the connecting pathway between two concepts, the location where  activation from two separate nodes meet  ** Priming‐ in this model, nearby related concepts receive a boost in their activation  levels, making them temporarily more accessible  SMITH'S FEATURE COMPARISON MODEL  Structural element: Feature list  ‐ suggests that we condised semantic memory to be a  collection of lists  Event‐related potentials‐minute changes in electrical potentials in the brain,  measured by EEG recording devices and related specifically to the presentation of a  particular stimulus • Used for determining neural correlates of cognitive activity • The observed change in electrical potential is a direct result of the mental  operations performed in response to the stimulus that was presented  • P/N (#) ‐positive/negative change occurring from about n ms • N400 component ‐particularly sensitive to the relatedness of the two concepts  in the sentence or, to their unrelatedness Pavio: 2 distinct systems for representing knowledge: 1. Verbal system ‐contains word meanings; located in the left hemisphere 2. Concrete system ‐ contains knowledge based on visual images; located in the  right hemisphere  • Concrete words processed in both hemisphere (its meaning and its image) • Abstract words only dealt with only in verbal terms (left hemisphere) ○ BUT!!!! ERP amplitude lower in right than left hemisphere foar bstract  words ○ ERP amplitudes lower for both hemisphere for concrete words  CATEGORIZATION, CLASSIFICATION, AND PROTOTYPES Bourne & Bunderson‐   how does an arbitrary combination of dimensions relate to  concepts  Rosch's report ‐ traditional concept identification research erred in testing stimuli that  were not comparable to concepts in the real world • Natural categories ‐ concepts and categories that occur in the real world of our  experience; have a complex internal structure • Rosch argued that real ‐world category members do not belong to their  categories in simple yes/no, a‐l r‐none fashion  • Rosch claimed that membership in categories is a matter of degree Perceptual categories‐ performance was influenced by the centrality of focal versus  nonfocal colours  • Good red was a better aid to accuracy than the nonfocal " ‐off" Semantic categories ‐ category name prepared people better for a judgment about a  typical member than for a judgment about an atypical member • Typical features tend to share fewer features with members of other categories  • Organization of semantic memory ‐ correlated featur
More Less

Related notes for PSYC 221

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit