PSYC 362 Chapter Notes -Convergent Validity, Cuckold, Natural Selection

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Published on 16 Apr 2013
School
Simon Fraser University
Department
Psychology
Course
PSYC 362
A Review of Sex Differences in Sexual Jealousy, Including
Self-Report Data, Psychophysiological Responses,
Interpersonal Violence, and Morbid Jealousy by Harris
(2003)
The article discusses/reviews Jealousy as a Specific Innate Model (JSIM).
Hypothesis: Natural selection shaped sexual jealousy as a mechanism to prevent cuckoldry, and
emotional jealousy as a mechanism to prevent resource loss. Therefore,
- Men should be primarily jealous over a mate’s sexual infidelity, and
- Women should be more jealous over a mate’s emotional infidelity
Self-Report Data Primarily from College-Age Populations
- Findings are consistent with the idea that men have a greater tendency to focus on or discuss
sexual matters in general
- No conclusive evidence or data that men are more jealous regarding sexual infidelity
Meta-Analysis of Forced-Choice Responses
- Used log-odds ratio (LOR); no sex difference would show a LOR of zero
- With gays and lesbians, there is no gender difference in jealousy over emotional vs sexual
infidelity
- Age: sex difference found in college samples, but the gender difference decreases with age
What Other Studies Found: Self-Report Data Inconsistent with JSIM
- No evidence found of a sex-by-type-of-infidelity interaction when participants used continuous
rating scales (degree) rather than a forced choice (this or that) (DeSteno & Salovey, 1996)
- Both men and women rated emotional infidelity as more distressing than sexual infidelity (though
women did so to a greater degree) (Sheets & Wolfe, 2001)
- Several studies have reported results that show both sexes are more bothered by sexual infidelity
(Harris, 2002; DeSteno et al., 2002; Wiederman & Allgeier, 1993)
- No difference in the amount of jealousy they anticipated having over a mate’s sexual infidelity,
but women did report greater anger and hurt than men (Shackleford, LeBlanc, & Drass, 2000)
- Women reported greater hurt and anger over sexual infidelity than did men (Geary et al., 2001)
Why JSIM doesn’t work
1. Data is steadily accumulating that suggest that the sex differences predicted by the JSIM are
rarely found when measures other than the forced-choice items are used to assess jealousy over
hypothetical infidelity
2. Even the forced-choice hypothetical results do not unequivocally support JSIM
3. The few studies that have compared the forced-choice responses to responses on other measures
designed to examine sexual and emotional jealousy have failed to find convergent validity
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Document Summary

A review of sex differences in sexual jealousy, including. Interpersonal violence, and morbid jealousy by harris (2003) The article discusses/reviews jealousy as a specific innate model (jsim). Hypothesis: natural selection shaped sexual jealousy as a mechanism to prevent cuckoldry, and emotional jealousy as a mechanism to prevent resource loss. Men should be primarily jealous over a mate"s sexual infidelity, and. Women should be more jealous over a mate"s emotional infidelity. Findings are consistent with the idea that men have a greater tendency to focus on or discuss sexual matters in general. No conclusive evidence or data that men are more jealous regarding sexual infidelity. Used log-odds ratio (lor); no sex difference would show a lor of zero. With gays and lesbians, there is no gender difference in jealousy over emotional vs sexual infidelity. Age: sex difference found in college samples, but the gender difference decreases with age. What other studies found: self-report data inconsistent with jsim.

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