Textbook Notes (368,432)
Canada (161,877)
Anthropology (102)
ANTHR101 (76)
Chapter 8

Chapter 8 Notes.docx

16 Pages
81 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTHR101
Professor
Francois Larose
Semester
Fall

Description
CHAPTER 8: FOOD PRODUCTION AND THE RISE OF STATES ­ beginning 14,000 YEARS AGO, people in some regious began to depend less on  big game hunting and more on relatively stationary food resources like fish, shell  fish, small game, and wild plants. ­ lead to increasingly settled life ­ this period is called EPIPALEOLITHIC in the middle east and MESOLITHIC  in europe. ­ 8000 BCE: NEOLITHIC REVOLUTION, the cultivation and domestication of  plants and animals in the middle east. ­ most of the world's major food plants and animals were domesticated well before  2000 BCE. ­ also developed by that time were techniques of plowing, fertilizing, fallowing,  and irrigation. BROAD­SPECTRUM COLLECTING: widely expanding diet to include many  sources of plants and animals. as opposed to just large mammals like mammoths  and other mega fauna. PREAGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENTS THE MIDDLE EAST: ­ Increased utilization of stationary food sources nearing end of Upper Paleolithic ­ this partly explains why some began to lead more sedentary lives ­ huge patches of wild grains grow naturally in anatolia today just as they had then.  one family of four could harvest more than enough food to feed them an entire  year. the sheer weight of this along with the tools (flint sickles, grinding  aparatuses) most likely necessetated a sedentary shift. THE NATUFIANS OF THE MIDDLE EAST ­ 11kya, NATUFIANS inhabited cave and rock shelters on the slopes of Mount  Carmel ­ had villages consisting of about fifty circular PIT HOUSES. paved walks,  permanent hearths, and village cemeteries ­ their tools suggest they harvested grain intensively. ­ earliest peoples we know stored grains ­ increasing social complexity, sites five time larger than predecessors, burials  suggest hierarchy forming ­ communities occupied most all of the year, if not year round ­ diet seems to have suffered, dental patterns suggest nutritional deficiency and  their stature declined over time.  MESOAMERICA ­ as glaciers receded at the end of the PALEO­INDIAN period, about 10,000 years  ago, the megafauna went extinct and the archaic peoples began to hunt smaller  mammals like bison, deer, antelope and such. Woodlands and grasslands expanded  providing new range of plants.  ­ Axes, adzes, mortars and pestles all appear at this time. THE ARCHAIC PEOPLES OF HIGHLAND MESOAMERICA ­ altitude became important factor ­ differences in vegetation in altitude meant wide swath of species in relatively  small area. ­ archaic mesoamericans moved back and forth between macro bands of 15­30  people to microbands of 2­5 people.  ­ macroband camps located near seasonaly abundant resources (acorns, mesquite  pods) ­ microbands retreat into caves or rock shelters, moving either upslope or  downslope to exploit different environments ­ unlike natufians, no evidence of social differences among archaic mesoamericans OTHER AREAS ­ CHANGE TO BROAD­SPECTRUM COLLECTING OCCURED IN  SOUTHEAST ASIA ­ sites found with species of plants and animals collected from several different  ecosystems (water, forest, highland, lowland, prairie) WHY DID BROAD SPECTRUM COLLECTING DEVELOP? It is apparent that the preagricultural switch to broad spectrum collecting was  fairly common throughout the world. ● warming climate killing off megafauna ● warming climate introducing new sources of food ● melting glaciers providing more water, thus more fish and shellfish ● perhaps we overkilled some of the megafauna ● population growth may have led to shift to broad­spectrum collecting ­ BROAD­SPECTRUM COLLECTING doesn't mean people were eating better.  decline in stature indivates a poorer diet. shell­fish are a labour intensive way to  get some protein, for example.  ­ either we or the environment or both killed off a lot of larger animals, forcing us  to look elsewhere for food.  ­ rise of broad­spectrum collecting linked to decrease in stature, suggesting it is a  poor diet BROAD SPECTRUM COLLECTING AND SEDENTARISM ­ does BSC explain sedentarism increasing? yes and no ­ highland mesoamericans do NOT become more sedentary ­ sedentarism is directly linked to nearness or the high reliability and yield of the  broad­spectrum resources rather than the broad spectrum itself. POPULATION GROWTH AND SEDENTARISM ­ settling down of a nomadic group reduces the typical spacing between births.  nomadic people have problem of carrying children ­ presence of baby foods other than mother's milk may be responsible for decreased  birth spacing in sedentary agricultural groups. ­ longer a mother nurses her baby without supplementary foods for the baby, the  longer it is likely to be before she starts ovulating again. thus, presence of  supplementary soft cereals and milk from domesticated animals allows woman to  ween earlier and begin ovulating, leading to greater population. ­ some research suggests a critical amount of fat must be in the body before a  woman can ovulate. sedentary women who don't have to walk many miles may be  fatter. THE DOMESTICATION OF PLANTS AND ANIMALS ­ NEOLITHIC means "OF THE NEW STONE AGE" but the Neolithic is now  characterized as the time when domesticated plants and animals arise. ­ people begin to produce food rather than just collect it ­ when people PLANT FOOD, and keep and BREED ANIMALS ­ domesticatin only refers to plants and animals that are artifically MODIFIED ­ wild grains have a fragile RACHIS, the seed bearing part of the stem.  domesticated grains have a tough RACHIS which does shatter easily ­ wild grains have a tough shell protecting the seed, domesticated grain has a brittle  shell that can be easily separated ­ wild goats have differently shaped horns than domesticated goats DOMESTICATION IN THE MIDDLE EAST ALI KOSH is a stratified site in SOUTHWEST IRAN.  Remains of a community  from 7500 BC.  ­ started out on wild plants and animals. ­ over next 2000 years until about 5500BC, agriculture and herding became  increasingly important ­ after 5500BC, two important innovations appear 1. IRRIGATION 2. USE OF DOMESTICATED CATTLE ­ these stimulate a minor population explosion. ­ of thousands of tools found, 1% were obsidian (found in eastern turkey) so these  people must have had contact with others.  ­ size of rooms in homes started to increase and other advances in mortar/mud  appear. courtyards. ­ village had only 100 people but was involved in extensive trading network.  ­ after 5500bc the area shows signs of much larger pop: IRRIGATION and  PLOWS DRAWN BY DOMESTICATED CATTLE. ­ by 4500, pop tripled ­ culminated in the rise of urban civilizations in middle east DOMESTICATION IN MESOAMERICA ­ VERY DIFFERENT: seminomadic Archaic hunting and gathering lifestly  persisted long after people first domesticated plants. ­ people sewed then left for annual hunt and came back later to harvest. DOMESTICATION IN EAST ASIA ­ late 6th millennium BC, sites where foxtail millet was cultivated are found in  NORTH china ­ people still depended on hunting and fishing despite domesticated pigs and dogs  are found ­ same time, sites in SOUTH china have cultivated rice, bottle gourds, water  chestnuts, and jujube. water buffalo, pigs, and dogs also domesticated ­ mainland SE Asiamay have been place of domestication as early as middle east  was.  ­ new guinea: banabas and taro  ­ other major plants: yams, breadfruit, coconuts DOMESTICATION IN AFRICA ­ long broad belt of woodland/savannah south of sahara and north of equator ­ sorghum, millet, yams ­ farmin became widespread after 6000bc WHY DID FOOD PRODUCTION DEVELOP? ● climate change? climate 13­12kya became more seasonal. summers hotter  and dryer, winters colder, favouring emergence of annual species of wild  grain ● population increase brought displaced people to try and replicate abundance  of areas they were displaced from? ● population pressure on a global scale? people populated the whole world by  10kya so there were no new unexploited areas for people to go to.  ● sedentary foraging (as with the Natufians) may have allowed for such a  population increase that they were forced to begin cultivating plants to feed  everyone. some natufians returned to nomadic foraging in response too. both  reactions, nomadism and cultivation ● planting crops may have only been for getting through the dry seasons when  meat is lean and hunter/gatherers actually starve because of it ● mesoamericans don't fit any of these hypotheses though and seem only to  have domesticated food for the sake of having more of the things useful to  them (like bottle gourds). maize didn't become a staple for 2500 years after it  was domesticated. CONSEQUENCES OF THE RISE OF FOOD PRODUCTION ­ we can't be sure why domestication began but we are sure that the shift to  INTENSIVE agriculture was in response to population rise ­ fertility is higher even today in societies where children contribute more to  economy, as they would in sedentary farming communities. ­ TWO PARADOXICAL TRENDS:  1. Rise of food production may lead to increased fertility 2. but it also leads to decline in health at least stometimes with the transition to  food production ­ decrease in health may be because of reliance on only a few staples leaves out  some nutrients and makes people more vulnerable to crop failure on account of  weather. ­ it may also be that increased food production has already begin to lead to  socioeconomic classes of people creating unequal access, btween and within  communiities, to food and other resources ­ spindle and loom appear and woven textiles are made possible ­ evidence of long distance trade in neolithic THE RISE OF CITIES AND STATES ­ from when agriculture first arose to 6000BC, people in middle east remmained  lving in fairly small villag
More Less

Related notes for ANTHR101

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit