Textbook Notes (368,180)
Canada (161,695)
Anthropology (102)
ANTHR487 (13)
Chapter

INCLASS Chp. 5.docx

8 Pages
58 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTHR487
Professor
Lesley Harrington
Semester
Fall

Description
Chapter 5                                   Consciousness  What is it? • our subjective experience of the world and of our minds • domain of the mind containing perception, emotions, memory that we are aware of • different from the external world  • different levels: coma, sleeping, drowsy, day dreaming/zoning out, tentativeness, focus concentration, meditation    Properties • intentionality Ł something directive, you can direct your consciousness there or here o how many things come into your mind, how much can you be aware off – limits of attention  • unity Ł when your conscious of one thing, you are only at that one thing • selectivity Ł everything around you but there is only one performance you see  • transience Ł constantly changing, never aware of one thing for a long time – even though you are focusing, things will try to get into your attention view  Origins • cooperation Ł important because we need to help collect food and survive as a group, survive from enemies  o coordinate Ł plan and be successful in the long run o communication Ł symbolic system like language to effectively express our emotions and needs  • internal monitor Ł thinking before you speak  Studying it • problem: other minds, everyone is different • consciousness, blue is blue but is your blue different from mine • solution: dismiss it, brain instead, ask people  o consciousness is misunderstand but if brain is perfect, then there shouldn’t be  o brain won’t be different because of structure and function  o asking people about their personal experiences                            Unconsciousness  What is it? • Domain of mind that contains perception, sensation, thoughts, memories we are unaware of  Freud  • the mind is conscious, preconscious, and unconscious  • preconscious Ł border line between knowing and never knowing – where the mind exists but you can’t access it • unconscious Ł dos the most work, where you sit, where you eat, who you date – based on hate, passion and desire  Cognitive  • perception Ł stuff about desire and repressed memories are gone  Unconscious • memory Ł seems instantly but you need retrieval cues and there are many types of memories – you can mis­remember  • snap decision Ł deliberate thinking and decision making  • subliminal message Ł are they real, does not affect behavior – randomly in class and it tells you to eat marshmallows  • priming message Ł real, engaging behavior that you’re already doing – you are really tired in class and it tells you to take a nap, you will sleep  o looking at random words but it all represented aging in a way or another, people walked out slower  Dualism  • mind and body are separated – soul and spirits are different • how can physical create non­physical – can’t get something from nothing o physical causality and psychical causality •  Chinese room and Searle argument Ł you’re stuff in an isolated room but there is a slit at the doorway, once in a while a piece of paper with Chinese  writing is pass through  o you have a source book that you follow the character lines and write down another translation  o this room is your mind, you can act on things without knowing what they really mean, just a reference  • evidence = introspection Ł relying on your own subjective feelings   Epiphenomenon  • brain to mind = hand to shadow o your brain can change your mind but you cannot change the mind to a brain  o shadows are manipulated by the hand but it can’t affect the hand  • brain damage Ł changes your consciousness but if you are blinded, you can still know where everything is spatially • stimulating brain Ł consciousness change with or without it and also with different kinds of stimulus • Benjamin Libet’s experiment: you can lift the finger whenever but remember the time of decision  o difference in time of deciding and actually doing it o recorded muscle movement and brain stimulus  o EEG activity was activated before you were aware you made a decision – 3/10 seconds earlier but should have came after the decision                              Drugs What is it? • chemicals that modify mental, emotional, and behavioral functioning • psychoactive drugs Ł chemicals that modify consciousness and effects mood and attitude  o 4 types: depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens, and opiates  Stimulants • not behavioral effect but NS activity  • examples: caffeine, nicotine, amphetamine, methamphetamine, cocaine, ecstasy  • physical effects: increased alertness and energy, insomnia, addictive • subjective effects: positive affect like euphoria, increased confidence, aggression, paranoia  Opiates • forms from plants and can induce a coma • has flu symptoms like vomit, cramps, sweats, runny nose  • endogenous Ł natural neurotransmitter activity for energy to fight or flight  • example: opium, heroine, morphine, methadone, codeine  • physical effects: endogenous opiods, relieves pain, additive • subjective effects: feelings of well being, relaxation, lethargy and stupor  Hallucinogens • intensive emotions, very heighten • example: LSD, PCP, mescaline, psilocybin, ketamine • physical effects: judgments, motor skills and coordination • subjective effects: emotions from bliss to intense fear, alters sensation and perception  LSD • lysergic acid diethylamid Ł a disinhibitor and suppresses the activity of serotonin   • 25 micrograms will destroy you – need very little to have effect • not addictive but lasts very long o tested on animals – they don’t press on the lever frequently o  addiction is based on the fact that the mouse will continuously pull the lever  Depressants  • example: alcohol, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, glue, gasoline • physical effects: slow reactions, inhibits things in the NS, poor judgment, additive • subjective effects: reduces anxiety, positive effect, euphoria, induces sleep  Marijuana • receptors = anadamide which is located all over your body, reason why it varies in effect • physical effects: impaired motor controls, coordination, poor judgment, STM  • subjective effects: positive effect, euphoria, heightened senses, hunger, laughter, introspective, sleepy                            Hypnosis What is it? • set of techniques given to people that provide suggestions for alterations in their perception, thoughts, feelings, and behaviors  • you become highly subjective and easily lured into  Statistics on  • 5­10 % of individuals are easily hypnotized – they want to please people, they zone out a lot, very imaginative  People being  Hypnotized • 15% of individuals can be hypnotized but easily awakened, not as easy as the first set  • the rest of us are easily woken up and on our own will Theories of  • sociocognitive theory Ł acting out what you’re supposed to do – role play and willinglyness Hypnosis • dissociation theory Ł mind has no idea what to do, you don’t know what’s real under hypnosis and what’s an image   Types of  • ideomotor Ł do something and an action will happen – voluntary feelings Suggestions • challenge Ł when you snap a finger or do a signal, the person can’t carry out an action • cognitive Ł thinking will change things, a needle won’t hurt  Misunderstanding  • hypnotized people can be amazingly stiff but normal people can do the same versus Truth • hypnotized people can recall suppressed memories but suggestions of these memories could be incorrect – you become confidence in incorrect memories • hypnotized people can stop the pain, analgesia  Limits  • case study: subjects are told a ruler is a gun/knife and told to kill another person, they did o they are told that it’s a ruler so it won’t be real o they won’t kill a person with a real knife  Rowland  • experiment 1: grabbing an angry rattlesnake Experiment • experiment 2: reaching into a sulfuric acid jar • experiment 3: throwing sulfuric acid in experimenter’s face  • result: people hypnotized or not still did the dangerous thing – they th
More Less

Related notes for ANTHR487

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit