Textbook Notes (368,562)
Canada (161,962)
Anthropology (102)
ANTHR487 (13)
Chapter 5

CHAPTER 5 CRIMI.docx

5 Pages
51 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Anthropology
Course
ANTHR487
Professor
Lesley Harrington
Semester
Fall

Description
Dunwoody­ CRIMINOLOGY 225. CHAPTER 5.  Positivism assumes that there is one•  Labeling perspective;  observe objective and subjective dimensions of criminal justice (involves interactionism) single consensus on what is good/  bad… actually, society tends to labe•  Positivist criminal just assumes that crime with the ever present in that must be recorded,  positivism also believe that  the powerless with negative stigmas there is a consensus in values  INTERACTIONISM • But, if you are to label good/ bad,  you’ll need to determine who is deviant and who is not SOCIAL CONTEXT • Social positivism brought for the idea of understanding how human beings actively create the social world that you The 50’s were a time in USA where  • USA pioneered labeling perspectives;  standards for deviance and conformity WERE MADE CLEAR common virtues were changing; gay/  lesbian couples were becoming  •  Social order viewed as monolithic, with one end goal ▯ everyone supported a common  status quo popular, hippie movements, youth  revolts against war, civic rights  • 50’s ▯  new USA. Birth of youth culture; youth  departed from existing conventions and deviancy was encouraged  movements by Martin Luther King..  as a social movement all showed that America would soon  face a new set of norms;   Familial conventions also began to see change; gay/lesbian men and women + waves of  feminism + women entering the military (Women’s Liberation Movement) ▯  continued changing way of life   Tackled assumptions on the American life Society is based on interactions; we   Civic rights movements, especially for Blacks (Malcom X/ MLK Jr) moved for an equally free society  give meaning to our surroundings  for all, not just white Americans and our behaviors are learned from  social interaction  Young people would begin rioting in the streets to protest conscription or activity in war (Vietnam­ USA) • Need to rethink conceptions of society, social order, and deviancy; society is subject to constant changes &  Libertarian values demand  pressure choice and free will  • Society is a plethora of interaction  ▯ we must  give meaning to situations to have a purpose/  significance  Some people disagree on actions that are right/ wrong (e.g. getting a tattoo, abortion) Labeling Approach ▯  there’s a  criminal and a victim. But   Libertarian values come forward ▯ demand  choice and free will when you label a criminal, you’re not ONCEPTS just labeling them for a  crime, you label them for  • Labeling is a social process; identify criminal, victim • Definition of a crime depends on the labeller  ▯ no crime is completely objective­ there’s a context involved. A judge will  life. There’s more to being called a  criminal than just the jail sentence/  decide the severity of a crime based on the context. fine.  • If we use this method we need to understand that crime involves observing the present stigmas and negative effects of  labeling and understanding that the labeling process diverges from the objective formal system (to  what extent is a criminal really fit their label?) YOU WILL NEED TO DETERMINE WHO IS BAD WHO IS GOOD… THAT’S HOW LABELLIGN WORKS! HUMAN BEINGS CREATE THE WORLD AROUND THEM; USA HAD VERY CLEAR STANDARDS FOR DEVIANCE AND  CONFORMITY.. UNTIL THE 50’S WHERE THINGS BEGAN TO CHANGE; SAME SEX COUPLES, CIVIC RIGHTS MOVEMENTS;  WE NEEDED TO RTHINK ABOUT SOCIETY’S VALUES AND NORMS AND HOW TO EFECTIVELY LABEL DEVIANCEY.  LABELLING IS A SOCIAL PROCESS… CRIME INVOLVES OBSERVING THE PRESENT STIGMAS AND THE NEGATIVE  AFFECTS OF LABELLING. LABELLING PROCESS DIVERGES FROM OBJECTIVE FORMAL SYSTEM… THERE’S MORE TO  LABELLING THAN JUST MAKRING A CRIMINAL, IT’S A STAMP THAT CONTINUES FOR YEARS ON END.  Criminals are outcasted; if you were outcasted, would you rather be with the  conventional society (who dislikes you) or with other outcasts (who understand you)?ls who have been labeled often seek comfort with other offenders  who have been labeled; builds a criminal subculture/  Criminal allegiances form subcultures; these cultures build up a collection of iminal network  ▯ stigmatization can have  worse  effects than just being a way to prove guilt … you stick  criminal values;  with the people who accept you;  You have a self, which is defined by social interaction and how people see you.  Typification is that we build our world around us through observing the •iffeBelieve that less serious offenses should not go to court so criminals to  people. .. labeling is a self­fulfilling prophecy;  avoid stigmatization on a minor crime ▯  AVOID STIGMATIZATION at all  costs!!!! Typification ▯ everyone sees the world differently • Believe that victimless crimes should be decriminalized to avoid  unnecessary stigmatization Negative labeling HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT Stigmatize a particular trait • Phenomenology ▯  specific events which determine specific behavior New identity formed.  Commitment to a new identity.  • Ethnomethodology ▯  • Labeling theory coincides with symbolic interactionism ▯ the  self is a  Labeling approach; labeling is the self­fulfilling prophecy, if you say someone is  symbol of social behavior and social action; self refers to peoples’  ARSALAN AHMED, CRIMINOLOGY 225 NOTES 1 Dunwoody­ CRIMINOLOGY 225. CHAPTER 5.  something long enough, eventually they’ll believe you.  perceptions of themselves;  They’ll become stigmatized and soon take on the roles/ expectations of that stiga…  Self is an active member of one’s interactions,  always changing and learning CONFORM BECAUSE YOU WANT TO BELONG, EVEN IF ITS FOR A CERTAIN  STIGMA   Each person constructs their own form of reality  through experiences; mine is different than yours ▯   Typification is when we draw from  knowledge to build our sense of the world • We define situations based on interaction;  everything is put  into a context ▯  It doesn’t matter what we see, it’s about how we interpret  and define it • Labeling is a self­fulfilling prophecy, we take on the  characteristics of our labels (e.g. I am smart, I am dumb, I am fat) and  make it our normal behavior •  Labelling occurs in 4 steps:  Negative labeling  Stigmatization (based on one particular trait)  New identity formed based on labeling  Commitment to new identity based on roles/  relationships CASE IN POINT 5.1 ▯ A Toronto police officer at York University warned women  not to dress like sluts as part of a public safety campaign; a woman got mad and had  the police officer apologize ▯ saw the negative label as a stigmatization of women  who are vulnerable to assault making them at fault, not as a means to protect women  in that situation…  • Juvenile delinquent is a label; focuses away from positive  qualities and gives a master public opinion that youth are  generally poorly natured… when you label people this way, they  will eventually take on these characteristics… juvenile deliqunet is  a label, negative label, focuses away from the good  qualities…  • Deviancy is the consequences of TWO THINGS.   Individuals vary in their behaviour, not every crime is the  same ▯  behavior  There is some form of labeling authority which will deem that  an action is deviant or not; it’s a title conferred on an  offender by society ▯  labeling! Labelling is a self­fulfilling propcehy! Because you take on these negative labels, turn  into stigmas on particular traits and then you take that label and it turns into  something workse eventually gyou get a new dienty and tdevelop your identity around  it.  Labelling involves two things… the behavior that was committed and also the  approach where someone in a higher authority said.. this is bad, you will be  punished! Why do people do this? THEY WANT TO BELONG! IN ANY WAY THEY  CAN! At least they can be part of society, even with a label.  Being alone is not fun! Think of what people do just to fit into a clique­ would  you rather take the hurt and be accepted or be alone for your entire life? Deviancy has two parts. There’s an action then a social response. A deviant is a bad person. • The social reaction is critical to the labeling  process  ▯ the perception of a person’s actions by a society defines  The funny thing about crime is that.. it’s present in every country + eveit’s position in society (conformist or deviant) social class • A deviant is a person labeled as bad; deviants are  Lemert ▯ he wanted to study criminal lifestyles. From the  primary law­brplaced on the outside of society  the way until the secondary deviation where someone takes on the lifestyle of  a criminal.  • Self­report surveys show that crime is existent in all  countries, in all classes. But some crimes are labeled as bad while  ARSALAN AHMED, CRIMINOLOGY 225 NOTES 2 Dunwoody­ CRIMINOLOGY 225. CHAPTER 5.  others are not ▯ e.g. White collar crime isn’t as bad as selling weed …  Matza sees that criminals aren’t criminals 100% of the time; drug dealers sTHE LABELLING APPROACH IS DEPENDTANT ON  buy groceries and watch TV and go to restaurants. If someone is given the cTHE CULTURE;  be free, they will take it! Because, you can’t live without conveLEMERTl society! Matza  focused a lot of his work on youth­ saying that youth can be best swayed by this  method.  • PRIMARY DEVIATION; initial deviant behavior;   although there are many causes that comes appointment everyone’s life  where they learn to rationalize the use of criminality (CAUSES  Crime is an emotional venture; you feel risky and thrilled when you do someINCLUDE: pure pressure,  psychological or social issues). But,  There’s  get away with it.  no change in identity, the offers legitimacy for future action.  You can’t compare a criminal’s understanding of crime to a law­abider or a •olice  SECONDARY DEVIATION; individual employs a role  offer with the crimes they commit; to take on a new persona and identity that  associates with the stigma criminal ▯ comes to a recognition that they  cannot go back to before MATZA • Youth criminals are more likely to respond to social reaction;  tend to  rationalize crime through neutralization • Youth perceptions on the effectiveness of the policing authority  defines their decision to be morally conscious; if they feel they  can get away with something, more likely to be conflicting • Youth are often involved in a drift betwee
More Less

Related notes for ANTHR487

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit