Textbook Notes (367,893)
Canada (161,477)
BIOCH498 (4)
Chapter 4

PSYCH CHAPTER 4 CORNELL.docx

6 Pages
123 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biochemistry
Course
BIOCH498
Professor
Brian Lanoil
Semester
Winter

Description
NOTES FOR MIDTERM # II • Synesthesia ▯  a disease where the perceptual experience is much  People with synesthesia =  have another feeling evoked  difference than others; some other sense invokes a feeling (e.g.  when they are sensitized to  words have a smell to them). A MUSICAL NOTE EVOKES COLOR;  something  People who are not synthesetic will not be able to taste sounds/ hear colors;  it’s a very common experience ­> seeing colors evoked by sounds/ smell from  touching a certain shape Sensation = how parts of the   Some senses are more active than others; some brains may simply be wired  body are stimulated by  certain triggers differently;   Sensation and perception are biologically defined… we need to adapt and  understand the world around us; the brain has to bring our surroundings into a  conscious awareness;   Vision is our dominant sense Perception, how we interpret • Sensation and Perception is NOT a seamless event; information is processed,  things registered, and interpreted by the brain   ▯ sensation & perception are  The brain is a perceptual  SEPARATE ACTIVITIES organ while the  • Sensation = Detection of physical energy by a sense organ ­ simple awareness due  to the stimulation of a sense organism; how the body is stimulated.  • Perception = involves the CNS, Our interpretation of raw sensory input ­  Transduction, how certain  organization, identification, and interpretation of a sensation in order to form a mental  stimuli are transmitted  through our organs and into  representation the brain • Eyes are a sensory organ, while the brain is a perceptual organ… transforms lines  of light into coherent images and concepts Psychophysics is how  • Sometimes people will think they are blind when they are not; sensation of organs is  present, but perception is not there… brain will not recognize that eye is being triggered;  sensation is made into  perception; perception is  • Senses depend on transduction; when many sensors in the body convert physical  subjective! signals from the environment into encoded neural signals to the CNS;   Vision ▯ light on retina makes image  Hearing ▯ Changes in air pressure will propagate through eithers  Touch  ▯ pressure of surface gives hints to shape  Taste  ▯ saliva reveal identity of substance PSYCHOPHYSICS ▯  The study of how sensations are turned into perceptions ­ the strength of a  stimulus and the observer's sensitivity to that stimulus (e.g. relate light brightness to observer’s  response) • Behavior must be operationalized; structuralists like Wundt failed miserably because you  Psychophysics tries to record  cannot describe your own experience to another person through words ▯ perception is  the differences in perception  subjective via defining certain stimuli  • Evoked memories/ emotions play a part into this as well;  ARSALAN AHMED, PSYCH 104 NOTES 1 NOTES FOR MIDTERM # II and comparing responses ABSOLUTE THRESHOLD ▯ we want to quantify measurement by AT;  minimum detectable  Absolute threshold = when source of a stimulus; a Threshold is a BOUNDARY ▯ the difference between sensing/ not  50% of people feel  sensing something; how loud does a sound have to be to be heard? How bright does a light have  something/ don’t feel to be? A point where 50% of trials have responded “Yes,” this is a point  Difference thresholds = we here it’s complete chance.  DIFFERENCE THRESHOLDS are more perceptive to  changes in stimuli than the  • Assesses how sensitive we are to faint stimuli; we are more receptive to detecting  presence of stimuli changes within a context as opposed to on/off stimuli; e.g. baby crying in  silent room, baby crying after 5 min of crying… different reactions JND is the minimum when  you can tell the difference  • JND = JUST NOTICEABLE DIFFERENCE; we are shown a s (standard)  between two stimuli and we check when people are able to tell a difference  WEBER BELIEVES YOU  • If S is a dim light, there is a small JND; but if S is bright, there is a large JND ▯ which is  CAN QUANTIFY THIS  right?  DIFFERENCE; APPLY WEBER’S LAW! • The just noticeable difference of a stimulus is a constant proportion despite variations in  SDT believes that sensation  is gradually made clearer;  intensity you perceive things on some  • The JND for weight is about 2­3%; if you pick up a 1­pound box vs a 2­pound  occurences and miss it on  box it’s easy! But if you choose between 20 and 20.1 pounds.. Harder to differentiate  others (almost impossible!) SIGNAL DETECTION Theory NOISE is a concern when  • Response to a stimulus depends both on a person's sensitivity to the stimulus in the  focusing on one stimuli presence of noise and on a person's response criterion (internal decision) Everyone is sensitive to  • Explicitly takes into account observers response tendencies, such as liberally saying  different things, not one  "Yes" or reserving identifications only for obvious instances single way to define • A discrete all or none response is unlikely! Belief that the transition from  sensing to non­sensing is gradual; people may perceive something on some  occasions, but not others (maybe they’re not focused; remember that an AT is only 50%  positive response;  • We are often affected by NOISE; other stimuli coming from internal & external  environment interfering with one’s function • You may NOT perceive everything you sense; e.g. you may have missed  1 or 2 of the quiet beeps that same to you; people have different sensitivities • We flash lights of varying intensities in all directions and see what response we can get.  SDT is more sophisticated  • We have 4 possibilities for results:  approach to establishing   Correct yes = hit thresholds  Light presented, observer says no = miss You have a couple of   Light not presented, observer says yes = false alarm  Light not presented and observer says no = correct rejection ARSALAN AHMED, PSYCH 104 NOTES 2 NOTES FOR MIDTERM # II options here; hit/ miss/  • Presents a way to measure perceptual sensitivity; how effectively perceptual  false alarm/ correct  system represents in three events rejection • Multitasking is not possible because of selective attention; perception only reveals  what’s current to you ▯ talking on the phone while driving engages the mind in the  Perception isn’t accurate conversation not on the road ▯ you need two brains to effectively multitask • Allows researchers to understand the perception isn’t always accurate Sensation declines when  you get used to it; we  SENSORY ADAPTATION perceive a change in  • Sensitivity to prolonged stimulation tends to decline over time as an organism adapts to  the current condition stimulation­ not the  presence of a constant  • If you were studying in a quiet room and a loud noise popped.. You’d be shocked. But  one after 10 minutes, noise wouldn’t be so freaky after.  • Perceptual systems emphasize change in sensory events Eyes convert light into  • Our senses respond more clearly to changes in stimuli rather than constant stimulation  signals for the brain, the  (e.g. the smell of the bottle depot isn’t so bad after 2 minutes) ▯ sensation declines once   brain will process these  you get used to something signals VISION ▯  Eyes & Brain Convert Light Waves • 20/20 associated with the Snellen Chart; assesses visual acuity  ▯ ability to see  Visual acuity Is the ability  fine detail; you can read the smallest line of letters from 20 feet; eagles have 10x  to distinguish fine detail,  visual acuity than humans; humans have sensory receptors in their eyes that respond to  we have 20/20 vision  according to Snellen wavelengths of light energy • Arrays of light allow us to make mental images of the
More Less

Related notes for BIOCH498

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit