Chapter One.docx

6 Pages
147 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Microbiology (Biological Sciences)
Course
MICRB265
Professor
Yan Boucher
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter One: Microorganisms & Microbiology  01/20/2014 Microorganisms: single­celled microscopic organisms  Includes viruses, which are microscopic but not cellular Differ from plant and animal cells because microorganisms are independent entities that carry out their life  prcesses independently of other cells – plant & animal cells are unable to live alone and exist only as parts  of multicellular structures  Properties of Cellular Life  All cells show some form of metabolism – take up nutrients from the environment and transform them into  new cell materials and waste products All cells have growth – the increase in cell number from cell division All cells undergo evolution – generally slow but can occur rapidly in microbial cells  Many cells are capable of motility (NOT ALL) – allows cells to move away from danger and unfavorable  conditions and towards new resources  Some cells can differentiate – aka they can form new cell structures such as spores  Many cells are able to communicate with each other by means of chemicals that are released or absorbed  Catalytic and Genetic Functions of the Cell  In order for a cell to reproduce, the catalytic parts of the cell (enzymes) supply energy and precursors for  the biosynthesis of cell component  The genetic functions of the cell include transcription, translation, and replication Both these processes must be highly coordinated  Evolution and the Extent of Microbial Life  During the first two billion years of Earth’s existence, the atmosphere was anoxic (oxygen was absent)  Only microorganisms capable of anaerobic metabolisms could survive under these conditions – included  many types of cells including methanogens (cells that produce methane)  The evolution of phototropic microorganisms (organisms that make energy from sunlight) occurred within a  billion years of formation – these were simple, anoxygenic phototrophs & are still present in anoxic habitats  today  Cyanobacteria (oxygenic phototrophs) evolved from anoxygenic phototrophs a billion years later and started  oxygenating the atmosphere This triggered the evolution of multicellular organisms  All cells are believed to come from LUCA (last universal common ancestor)  Pathogens: microorganisms that cause infectious diseases in humans   Death from pathogens has decreased due to the development of antibiotics (antimicrobial agents),  understanding of disease processes, increased sanitary practices, etc Microbial diseases include: malaria, tuberculosis, chlorea, etc.  Microorganisms, Disgestive Processes, and Agriculture  There are nitrogen fixing bacteria that convert atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia that plants are then able  to use as a nitrogen source for growth – cuts down the cost of nitrogen fertilizer Microorganisms are present in the colon and on the skin – benefit humans by occupying space that could  have been occupied by harmful bacteria Are not always only helpful – obviously  Historical Roots of Microbiology: Hooke, van Leeuwenhoek, and Cohn  Hooke illustrated molds he observed through this microscope and this was the first known description of  microorganisms  Leeuwenhoek was the first person to see bacteria – considerably smaller than molds  People confirmed Leeuwenhoek’s findings but were unable to understand the nature and importance of  bacteria for many years  Once more developed microscopes were available it became easier to study microbial life Cohn discovered the formation of endospores in certain bacteria – he described the life cycle of the  endospore forming bacterium  Bacillus  (vegetative cell ▯ endospore ▯ vegetative cell) & showed that  vegetative cells could be killed by boiling but endospores could not  He started a system for the classification of bacteria  Devised methods for the prevention of contamination of cult
More Less

Related notes for MICRB265

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit