Textbook Notes (367,988)
Canada (161,542)
Psychology (527)
PSYCO282 (84)
Chapter 18

Psych 282 behaviour modification Positive punishment chapter 18.docx

3 Pages
105 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO282
Professor
Karsten Loepelmann
Semester
Fall

Description
Positive punishment: The person does something or is given stimuli that he does not  enjoy doing in hopes that he will not do a particular behavior.  Application of aversive activities: Application of aversive activities: contingent on the behavior, the child was made o  engage in an aversive activity (i.e. something that he really hated to do or did not enjoy or  is a low probability behavior ) and as a result the problem behavior was less likely to  occur in future. This is also based on the premack principal. It is a behavior that acts as a  punisher for another behavior. Often require physical prompts as no one wants to do these  things.  You always tell person ▯ then you use physical guidance to perform a certain behavior ▯ the   client then perform the behavior with just a verbal overtime. There are different types of  aversive activities that can be performed. Overcorrections: person has to perform effortful, low­probability behaviors contingent  on the problem behavior for extended period of time. This was initially used to decrease  disruptive and aggressive behavior in people with intellectual and disability. There are  two forms of these: ­Positive practice: after a problem behavior, person must correctly perform an opposite  or appropriate behavior repeatedly for around 5­15 min or until correctly performed.  Called overcorrection because the person engages in it for a long time. e.g., after rushing  and getting many math problems wrong, a student has to do them over again and  correctly for 10 times ( it is an aversive activity and should decrease future problem). ­Restitution: after a problem behaviour, person must correct the effects of the problem  behaviour and restore the environment­­usually to a condition better than they were  initial ( physical guidance is used as required) e.g.,after getting clothes muddy, a child has  to wash and iron them and put them away neatly Contingent Excercise: after a problem behaviour, a person must perform physical  exercise, usually not related to the problem behavior. The way it differs from over­ correction in that in overcorrection, the person must perform the problem behavior  correctly or behavior that correct the disruption to the environment caused by the  problem behavior where as in here you perform physical exercise ( it should be not  harmfull though) that is not related to the problem behavior( e.g., drill sergeant makes a  recruit do 20 pushups after failing to perform adequately) . Both can use physical  guidance though. Guided complains: after a problem behavior, a person is physically guided (like hand  over hand) to complete a requested behavior like a physical guidance prompt and for  many people, guided compliance is aversive if it is not then don’t use it.It is withdrawn  after the person can perform the behavior himself in this case compliance is negatively  reinforced. So it serves as a positive punishment and a negative reinforce ( in some  situation it can also me an extinction like in situation where escape is involved Physical restriants: after a problem behaviour, the behaviour analyst holds immobile the  part of the person’s body that performed the behavior. It is very important to note if this  will function as punisher or reinforce ( some people might love been holded). One  variation of physical constraint is  response blocking: behavior  analyst physically prevents th person from carrying out or  completing the problem behavior. After this the control agent can then physically  constraint this person. e.g., stopping a child from putting her thumb in her mouth, to prevent thumb­sucking and  holding her for a little while ( restraint). All of the above involve some types of physical contact and because of that caution is  required and these include that the aversive stimuli be applied only when: 1) Change agent can provide physical guidance 2) Change agent must anticipate initially resistance and must be certain that he can  deal with it 3) Make sure the physical guidance is NOT
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO282

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit