Textbook Notes (367,936)
Canada (161,516)
Psychology (527)
PSYCO341 (21)
Chapter 5

chapter 5.docx

3 Pages
114 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO341
Professor
Taka Masuda
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 5: development and socializations. When Kinds of Childhood Experiences Differ Across Culture? • Infants Live in Different Cultures Too: Sleeping arrangements vary across cultures. •  Sharing nighttime with others (co­sleeping):  European descent middle­class North Americans, infant’s sleep by themselves in  their own bedroom. This is often even on the first day at home.  Japanese think that leaving their infants alone at night is  regarded as a form of child abuse. As a default, Japanese kids always stay with their caregivers. this is often same as  Asian/African/Latin Americans as well compare to pure americans. • The very first experiences of infant­caregiver relationships may be the foundation of cultural variations in interpersonal  relationship. It is possible that might be you don’t have enough room that's why you do co­sleeping. This Is true. But there are  other reasons as well?  Yes • Study by Shweder et al. (1995) asked Indian and American adults to decide how various combinations of family members could  be arranged in the bedrooms of a house.  • Procedure: In one version, they were told the house had 3 bedrooms, and the family included a mother, a father, two daughters  (aged 14 and 3), and three sons (aged 15, 11, and 8). Question: if you have three rooms, how do you divide them into three  rooms? • The incest avoidance moral is universal (teen ages 15/14 boys and girls should not be allowed to sleep with parents. This is  universal • European descent middle­class North Americans also share two types of Moral: the “sacred couple,” “The autonomy ideal  (mostly North Americans do this) morals (Son share another room, and all daughter share another room=autonomy and mom and  dad in mom room=sacred couple) • East Indians share three types of Moral: “the protection of the vulnerable (the young either son or daughter should be with their  parents)” “Respect for hierarchy (older boys are given the status to not sleep with other and given their own space and the  youngers should be together” and “female chastity anxiety” morals  (someone should be their always with this teen/14 year old) • Results: American dominantly selects the first pattern. All boys and all girls should be alone and mom and dad. Indians hade two  patterns. One that is similar to Americans and one that is different (young children’s should be supported, and older daughters  protected and older boys separate). Thus these relationships at night might be the foundation of interpersonal relationships. Cultural Differences in Preferred Sleeping Arrangements among European Canadians, Chinese Immigrants, and Chinese: • In China, co­sleeping is taken for granted. How about Chinese Immigrants? ( they show it still) • Is Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (Sids) rare among them? • Results: 80% Chinese in chinaàco­sleeping. 85%à European Canadianàseparate sleeping  • Chinese immigrantsà still persistent even if the culture changes but it is a bit weaker. Thus they transmit the traditional  strategies. Cross­Cultural Research on Parenting Interactions • Study Heidi Keller: Contrasted parenting interactions with 3­month­old infants in five cultural contexts: urban middle­class  Germans, urban middle­class Greeks, urban lower­class Costa Ricans, rural Indian Gujarati, and rural Cameroonian Nso. (she  assumed these culture are all different) • Researchers made 20 unannounced visits with mothers and infants over a one­week period and videotaped them for 15­minute  intervals. Within these 15­minute intervals, detailed behaviors were coded for interspersed 10­second intervals. Body, face­to­ face contact, and response to both positive and negative signals from the baby and mother reaction to it were recorded. • Percent of Time in Bodily Contact with Infant: All mothers show much bodily contact. The Nso mothers were observed  carrying the infants in every observed instance.  Greeks and Germans showed the least amount of bodily contact. • Percent of Time in Face­to­Face Contact with Infants: All mothers made much face­to­face contact. But Greeks and Germans  made considerably more face­to­face contact than those from other cultures • Warmth Shown in Response to Infant’s Positive (i.e. smiling) Signals (Z­scores): Compared with other mothers, Greek  mothers showed the warmest response to infant’s positive signals. And Gujarati mothers showed the least warm response. • Warmth Shown in Response to Infant’s Negative Signals (Z­scores): Compared with other mothers, Costa Rican mothers  showed the warmest response to infant’s negative signals. Implications:  • Early experiences of infants differ dramatically around the world.  People’s minds develop in highly different circumstances.  • Although longitudinal research has yet to be conducted to directly link early infant experiences with adult preferences and  behaviors, it is not unreasonable to expect that these early experiences are critical to shaping people’s development. • How might some of these early experiences affect people’s development? Sensitive Periods for Cultural Socialization • SomeAspects of Culture are learned in a Sensitive Window. In particular, some aspects of language are learned in a sensitive window. • Asensitive window indicates a biological preparation for the acquisition of the information. • Humans have evolved such that they learn a language in a particular period of life (from very early, and the sensitivity declines markedly after puberty). If you are able to communicate well then from evolutionary point of view it is very important for your survival. Study of Phoneme (sound system of language) Discrimination • For example, TAKA cannot differentiate between L and R (requires a lot of energy). Japanese have hard time saying F and H.  instead of saying V and B.  Rice vs. Lice. Lover vs. Rubber.  • Study compared infants from English speaking and Hindi speaking parents (Werker & Tees, 1984). • Task was whether infants could discriminate between two Hindi phonemes that are indistinguishable to adult non­Hindi speakers. • Results indicated that English infants younger than 8 months could reliably distinguish between the Hindi phonemes. Indeed,  phonemes from all languages can be discriminated by young infant • However, by 10­12 month of age, the English infants could no longer discriminate between the two Hindi phonemes.  They had  learned to categorize sounds into Eng
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO341

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit