Textbook Notes (367,917)
Canada (161,498)
Psychology (527)
PSYCO341 (21)
Chapter 6

CHAPTER 6 book notes.docx

10 Pages
93 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Psychology
Course
PSYCO341
Professor
Taka Masuda
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 6 CHAPTER 6 SELF: ND PERSONALITY Introduction: Compare Japanese and American gold medalist interviews. Who am I? The classic study: Twenty­Statements test Two main “results”: Personal Characteristics Roles and Memberships STUDY: Kenyans VS Americans VS “Americanized” Kenyans of various degrees. Independent VS Interdependent Views of the Self Independent See the self as separate from others with stable traits across the lifespan and across (social) situations. Perceive self as very unique. Feel an obligation to publicly advertise themselves as having these attributes. See Graphic P 201 1. Note that the circle around the individual does not overlap any other circles. Identities are distinct from others 2. Xs inside circle represent aspects of identity. Larger ones are important Important­seeming ones (large Xs) lie within individual. 3. Border around the individual is drawn with a solid line. The self is bounded and stable. 4. Border around the ingroup is dotted, to indicate that it is fluid.  Others can move in and out of the ingroup relatively easily. Ingroup and outgroup have differences of closeness, but are not fundamentally distinct. (All non­selves are  fundamentally the same) Interdependent Focus on how you are connected with others You are not a distinct entity, but a participant in a larger social unit. See Graph P 203 1. “Individual” circle overlaps with others. Experiences and identities are not individual, unique entities. 2.  Xs inside circle. Big, important Xs lie within intersection between individual and close others. Relationships come in a variety of form and particular roles must be taken. Note SMALL Xs are in individual only. 3. Dotted line surrounding individual Identity is fluid, and will change depending on situation. 4. Border separating ingroup and outgroup is solid Ingroup relationships are self­defining. They are “fundamentally different” than the outgroup in that respect,  and it is much harder to become an ingroup member. STUDY: fMRI Self­Concept difference Question to participants: “How well does this trait describe you or your mother?” Result: Westerners showed different regions of brain activation during task. Chinese showed same regions  of brain activation. Showing that Chinese representations for themselves and their mothers are not distinct  and represent the self concept. Psychological implications with differences in the self­concept: The ways that humans view themselves are CENTRAL to human cognition. It “changes the computer” if  you will. Individualism and Collectivism These words relate to the type of CULTURE, not the individual. Culture causes the individual, and the individuals cause the culture. Where do we find individual and collectivist cultures? STUDY: Geert Hofestede who gave questionnaires to IBM employees across a looottt of different countries.  Mapped out the world in terms of degree of individualism. INTERDEPENTENT/COLLECTIVISM IS MORE  COMMON IN TERMS OF HEAD COUNT (80%) There are also pockets of it all over the states (Hawaii, for instance) Note: Our research comes mostly from independent culture (ESPECIALLY because our research is done in  University­esque places). So how much do we REALLY know about the world. Beyond Individualism and Collectivism Other dimensions… Power distance Uncertainty avoidance Vertical­horizontal social structure Relationship structure ETC. See notes about Hofstede’s work. A note on heterogeneity of Individuals and cultures Remember that independent and interdependent are not so much categories, but rather a continuum. A determinant for how often one feels independent or interdependent Situations that occur in daily life REMEMBER THAT EVERYTHING WE SAY IS “ON AVERAGE” Gender and Culture In general Women = more interdependent Men – more independent STUDY: Ask men and women from Western Cultures and men and women from Easten cultures to complete  questionnaires. Result: Culture had the effect, not gender. BUT women scored higher on “relatedness” (Not other aspects  of inderdependency). So it’s not full accurate to say that women are more interdependent than men. Differences in attitudes towards gender equality STUDY: Sex Role Ideology questionnaire ▯ Strikingly different views of gender equality around the world.  Interestingly, Men and Women shared similar views within a culture! But USUALLY the male was a little  more against gender equality. More urbanized or individualistic = more gender equality. Historical approach to gender norms? AGRICULTURE: Shifting Cultivation: Earth being dug up with a hoe (or similar tool) Where shifting cultivation is practiced, women do the agricultural work with children nearby. Plough cultivation A large animal uses a plow to turn over the soil Controlling the plow requires lots of muscular strength and bursts of energy. Men typically do it. Also, it  requires more concentration, so children must be elsewhere. WOMEN ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY LOOK  AFTER DOMESTIC AFFAIRS. WE TEND TO PRESERVE GENDER ROLES BORN FROM AGRICULTRE Gender “essentialized” approach? Which gender is more closely tied with an unchangeable essence? Americans tend to view male gender  identity to be more essentialized than female gender identity. A woman can present themselves like a man.  Nbd. But a man can’t really present himself like a woman. The gender that is essentiallized tends to be associated with more power. STUDY: Hindus. Brain switching. Not all that important, but skim over p215 maybe. Some other ways that cultures differ in the self­concept Self­Consistency What is it: How consistently we act across varied situations Cultures vary considerably in the degree of their motivation for self­consistency STUDY: “Who am I” questionnaire given IN DIFFERENT CONTEXTS. (Who was sitting near student) Japanese VS Americans Postive statements VS Negative statements. NOTE: Big implication for context in ALL questionnaire studies! Maybe we need to be careful! Cognitive Dissonance: A powerful motivator for consistency. When we are inconsistent with ourselves, we get distressed and act to  fix it. Either change behavior or change attitudes. Changing attitudes is known as “Dissonance Reduction” Eg: Pick a school out two good choices, suddenly, you’ll find the pros of the good school even stronger, and  the pros of the other school inconsequential. STUDY: Dissonance reduction tendencies between Japanese and Cana
More Less

Related notes for PSYCO341

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit