Textbook Notes (368,439)
Canada (161,878)
Sociology (224)
SOC225 (51)
Chapter 8

chapter 8 early theories of crime.docx

4 Pages
74 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC225
Professor
Temitope Oriola
Semester
Winter

Description
Earlier explanation for crimes: Evil spirits and supernatural forces were seen as the cause of committing crime. Thus the misfortune  was seen a failure of their own moral failure. You had to be possessed by devils or the devil gave you  temptations that led you to commit crime. Normal person will not commit crime.  Led to very harsh treatment of offenders who were seen as threats to the religious order as well as the  social order.  This was a good way to divert attention (during a time of huge change in society) from the elite who  were corrupt and to place the blame on possessed people. Also they made themselves more powerful  as they alone had the power to get rid of these demons (religious authority). Those who went against  this order were considered to have committed heresy and punished. Witches=perfect scapegoat to  vent your anger and mainly victimized woman ( those in power in man dominated society) th th Rapid social change. Came about during 17  and 18  centuries, there was a ‘scientific revolution’ in  which People began to look at the world very differently. Their Worldview based on experience  rather than just authority and faith and this Led to new approach to crime. Humanism for example  meant that we can trust people’s experiences on which we can based out knowledge.   (Enlightenment: radical thoughts came about. Rather then saying oh my god, you say oh my science.  What u could not see, touches, face, hear, did not exist). Called for human right and freedom and that  people are free and rational beings ( world based on people ability to reason rather then religion etc). The landowners who had the outmost political power made still many of the laws. Even thought the  merchants had more money then them. When the monarch was fighting a lot of war, the merchants  came into help with money in exchange for political power. This led the to the implement of  enlighten principals and led to classical school. Classical school Cesare Beccaria, who provided a focus fro the humanitarian reform movement with focus on the  inhumanity that characterized the CJS, started this school. He said abuse in CJS was routine and the  torture was inhuman. The punishment was th bad that about 350 offences (like property stolen such  as car) were punishable by death in 18  century England. About 70% of death sentences were for  robbery & burglary and bad cheques. This shows how the Moral and social and the legal order  functioned back then ( a very barbaric system). Classical theory:   Part of the philosophy of the Enlightenment, specifically the social contract theory (which is  when part of liberty is giving to the state, monarch, queen or some kind of authority in exchange  for security and protection of our lives and property). Hobbes and others said people entered into  a contract with the state for their mutual benefit.  Citizens gave up some of their personal freedom  in exchange for protection by the ruler. (Authority to govern comes from the people and not from  god).  This was a contract that bound both parties.  The state could not violate the rights of  citizens and citizens had to obey the rules. Thus the harsh punishments for minor offences  violated the contract because the state had no right to abuse citizens.  CESARE BECCARIA (An Essay on Crimes & Punishment): Society needed a system of  punishment that was severe enough to deter, but not so harsh that rights were violated. This  would mean curbing arbitrariness, torture, etc. ( not torturing and so on to get a confession)  They argued that Deviance is the natural result of our rational self­interest (it pays) (people did  not commit crimes due to devil but rather because it pays or something is to be derived from this  like economic benefits from banks). Supernatural forces are not responsible for criminality  A system of punishment must be set up to deter people from breaking the law. The punishment  should fit the crime, not the criminal. This punishment should be followed as soon as possible  otherwise it will not be effective. The rules have to be simple enough so common person can  understand.  Judicial discretion was severely limited (they will have to follow that law given to them and not  make up any. Thus legislator/law makers are separate from the judiciary.) Everyone should be  equal before the law and Advocated the implementation of due process safeguards so no breaking  of this law occurs.  Our JS is shaped by this law even though there are flaws (like due process which is the separation  of the two legal system and equality before law) WEAKNESSES OF CLASSICAL THEORY  Making the punishment fit the crime, not the criminal sounds reasonable, but circumstances (i.e.  motives, mental competence) of cases vary widely, so reducing judicial discretion (i.e. they can’t  say anything must follow the law as is) resulted in injustices ( if 13 year kill someone, should the  punishment still fit the crime. Or poor person paying 1000$ vs rich person, can mean a huge  difference in effect on that person)  Neoclassical criminologist rejected the notion of free will in that there must be individual  treatment of the offender because there are many factors that determine what decision we make  ( mental competence, age, and other circumstances)  Deterrence doctrine (crime prevention based on fear of punishement) not as effective as hoped  because likelihood of punishment is low and cases take time to resolve   Notion of free rational person is over­simplified: individuals may face different objective realities  ( there are many thing in life that effect our decision thus we are NOT free willed)  We think that people gain something when we commit crime but what about people who just kill  their kid they don’t gain anything  Lastly, this was NOT based on empirical evidence but rather philosophical speculation. IMPACT OF CLASSICAL THEORY  Led to legal principles such as due process and equality before the law (such as the charter of  rights and so on).  However, the system has also adopted neo­classical reforms that allow more judicial discretion  and individualized justice ( like for the kids under the age of 18 thus creating two different justice  system for different people. It is a product of enlightenment. Our rights are all product of this as  well)  Promulgation of individual rights and freedoms into law in France, USA, Canada, etc. owe its  inspiration to classical theory The statistical school:  ANDRE­MICHEL GUERRY, ADOLPHE QUETELET, HENRY MAYHEW  Believed that crime, like other behavior, had natural social causes (it is like any other behavior.  But the epicenter of crime is in the society. If you are looking for reason of 
More Less

Related notes for SOC225

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit