Textbook Notes (368,611)
Canada (162,009)
Sociology (224)
SOC225 (51)
Chapter 5

chapter 5 correlates of crimes .docx

5 Pages
108 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Sociology
Course
SOC225
Professor
Temitope Oriola
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 5: correlates of crimes Correlation defined: A correlate of crime is a variable that is related to crime. The two strongest correlates of crime are  age and sex.. Note that correlation does not mean causation ­ correlation is a necessary, but not  sufficient, condition for causation. Correlations data often helps us in testing our theories that we  might have regarding the causes of crimes. Thus it helps us come up with theories that we can then  further test. Always think of a crime as caused by multiple factors that combine to produce effects. AGE AND CRIME Universally, young people commit more crime than older people. This is true of most types of crime.  The age group is mostly btw 15­20 and peaking at 18 (peaked in the 18 to 24 year­old age group). In  2009, approximately a third (34%) of murder victims and almost half (49%) of the offenders were  under age 25. In many cases we find that these age groups are overly represented (i.e. make up only  12% of general population but 31% of all cases) and we see mostly property crimes in these cases.  However, Different crimes peak at different ages. For example one exception is political crime and  certain types of corporate crime (white collar crimes) where young people lack access to the means  of committing the offences so older age people do these. How can we explain the rise and fall of crimes then? Change in population structure: Since the young are over­represented we can conclude that if the  number of adults in the population in that particular age group decrease, their should be a decrease in  crime ( exactly what we saw in baby bummers of 1980). But this is one of many. MATURATIONAL REFORM(MR): the idea that as young want the role of adults in society but  they don’t get it so to be like an adult, they commit  a lot of crime. But as they reach Adolescence,  which is a time of transition, and as people get older, they develop attachments and commitments  (such as permanent jobs and marriage) that restrain their misbehavior. 2) theft decreases as now they  have financial support and no longer dependence on peers. 3) Vandalism and valance is when the  young’s self esteem decrease as he is ashamed by the school teachers in front of peer. To get that SE  back in front of peer, he resort to these activities. As you leave school, no effect on SE ▯ back to  normal now. (Some don’t agree with this like having some work▯finance▯+ correlation with crime).  Majority of the support is for MR in that MR is increase if marriage/employment/graduation from  school occurs vs MR delayed if gang is joined (social variables involved) BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF AGING: As you age, you physical ability to commit crimes  decreases a lot. Skill level: MORE SKILLED AT EVADING DETECTION AS THEY GET OLDER. SEX AND CRIME : Men are much more likely to commit crimes than women. This varies by offense ­ men are most  likely to commit violent and serious property offences (based on statistics men are more homicide  viction & offenders then females). Also men are more of sexual assault vs females mostly  prostitution.  Rates are closest for minor property offences (shoplifting, bad cheques) and mainly in youth  then adults. But females are beginning to move into crimes that were previously men  dominated but they tend to be less severe like theft of a less value/violent. but again, still  females are minor crimes like petty property crimes to which females are traditionally  associated. So gender has narrowed but disparity still exists.  Data: 1986­2005:   Females rate for serious crimes have increased but lower then men still.   The rate at which woman are charged with assault more then doubled while rate of  men assault and serious crimes and common assault decreased.   The gap btw female and male charged with assault has narrowed a lot. Chapter 5: correlates of crimes  Adult female charge rates for serious property crimes have decrease since mid 1990s  and their theft of an item other then motor=decreased a lot then serious property crimes  ( but less likely to be reported to police.  Adults males charge rates have declined to a greater degree BUT remain higher that  females rates stated above. Various explanations for the sex differences:  Biological & psychological factors ( men and woman are different in these two natural  aspect like hormones and body strength)   Otto Pollak: Supposed ‘greater cunning & deceitfulness’ of women (woman are just as  likely and are better able to plan and escape using these treats)  Chivalry thesis: Preferential treatment by law enforcement agents & agencies (staffed by  male and thus feel they have obligation towards the females and thus are more generous  towards them compare to males. They think also males do most of the things)  CONVERGENCE THEORY: AS WOMEN’S ROLES BECOME MORE LIKE MEN’ (i.e.  there roles change as society structure changes, and thus expectation changes), CRIME  RATES WILL CONVERGE.  There is Cross­cultural evidence in that Increase in women’s  crime during last half of 20  century supports convergence. But these are Limited to petty  theft and fraud (perhaps feminization of poverty rather than convergence). Some believe that  this is feminization of poverty:  Research: post secondary education and female in labour force increase ( show convergence  into men’s role), and fertility rate of females decrease ( traditional roles decrease). Thus  supports convergence theory. However, chivalry thesis might be more applicable.  BUT,  others argue, that woman offenders are poor, young, undereducated, and unskilled, suggesting  females crimes at least has socio­economic factor which is why leads to property crimes  NOW ( so increase in property crimes  seem to suggest police no longer following chivalry  thesis and increase socio­economic disparity seems to be the cause for this) Race and crimes in US  (see notes): Minorities are over­represented (their population since in general is small but in jails they represent a  lot of people)  A vastly disproportionate number of federal death sentences come from counties with  high minority populations that are located in districts that are heavily white overall (see Cohen &  Smith 2010).  Even in death penalty, race does matter (depends on who does it, where the crimeà  death penalty).   The case of Missouri:  Both federal districts in Missouri display the racial demographics that are  racially diverse: urban county surrounded by heavily white suburban counties. Thus , Missouri has  returned more federal death sentences than New York, California, and Florida combined (geographic  dynamics do play a role). Thus can be further seen in that The three districts in which it has been  hardest for the feds to get a death sentence (District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Southern  District of New York) are all majority­minority.  Ddominated by minority (as the crime is constant,  where minority is dominant, the death penalty is not given. Thus where a crime is committed plays a  huge role ( in overall, we see more black/more males death sentences) Race and crime in Canada (aboriginals)  Aboriginals (minority) people are over represented in CJS (Canadian justice system).  Some suggest  this is due to over police surveillance by these specific groups (I.e. blacks being stopped more then  anyone else).  We also see 40% increase in imprisoning of aboriginals, get more severe punishment  even when the crime is constants and are Not granted parole, and are revoked if given parole, most of  Chapter 5: correlates of crimes them are given less punishment but then they can’t pay the fines so end back up in jail. They are  known to be more accused of more of violent and property crime. There seems to be considerable difference across the country of aboriginals in correctional facility  (Alberta=40% in jails). Those in jails are more likely to be young, low education, low employment,  unstable families, previous contact with justices system, negative peer association and so on.   Other data: 10* more likely to be accused of homicide,  (perhaps age composition might
More Less

Related notes for SOC225

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit