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Chapter 5

Strier Chapter 5.pdf

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Department
Anthropology
Course Code
ANTH 311
Professor
All

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Chapter Five Evolution and Sex
Sexual Selection
Sexual Dimorphism
Phylogenetic Constraints
Ecological Constraints
Mating Patterns
Mating Patterns Where Females are Solitary
The Case of Monogamy
Box 5.1 Gibbon Games and Tarsier Tactics
An Extreme Form of Polygyny
Polyandry
Ambivalent Polygamy
Mating Patterns When Females Live in Groups
Single-Male Female Groups
Multi-Male Female Groups
Extra Group Copulations
Seasonal versus Aseasonal Breeders
The Influence of Males on Females
Female Mating Strategies
Sperm and Fertilization
Food and Safety from Predators
Allies against Aggression
Parental Investment
Good Genes
Sexual Signals
Female Choice and the Unpredictability of Ovulation
Sexual Swellings and the Female Dilemma
Male Rank and Reproductive Success
The first two sections of this chapter, Sexual Selection and Sexual Dimorphism, are
covered in class as well. Here Strier suggests that sexual dimorphism evolves by male
competition or male coercion, whereas you will notice that in lectures, and later in the
text, it is said to evolve by male competition or female choice. All three (male
competition, male coercion, and female choice) play a role in the evolution of sexual
dimorphism. In any case, notice the emphasis on the different reproductive strategies of
males and females, and the importance of competition among males. Strier describes
how life history characteristics, like the frequency with which females are fertile (see
interbirth interval), affects how often a male is likely to encounter a reproductive
opportunity. Be sure to know all terms in bold, such as operational sex ratio. The
sections on Phylogenetic and Ecological Constraints consider how these two other factors
can limit the extent to which sexual dimorphism can evolve. (An 800 pound male
monkey might have trouble climbing trees and getting enough food to eat, regardless how
much the ladies like him or the boys fear him). Please note that there is a typo on page
119 in the middle of the second paragraph. Where it says “Dense vegetation may also

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Description
1Chapter FiveEvolution and SexSexualSelection Sexual DimorphismPhylogenetic ConstraintsEcological Constraints Mating PatternsMating Patterns Where Females are Solitary The Case of MonogamyBox 51 Gibbon Games and Tarsier Tactics An Extreme Form of Polygyny Polyandry Ambivalent PolygamyMating Patterns When Females Live in Groups SingleMale Female Groups MultiMale Female Groups Extra Group Copulations Seasonal versus Aseasonal Breeders The Influence of Males on Females Female Mating StrategiesSperm and FertilizationFood and Safety from PredatorsAllies against AggressionParental InvestmentGood GenesSexual Signals Female Choice and the Unpredictability of Ovulation Sexual Swellings and the Female Dilemma Male Rank and Reproductive Success The first two sections of this chapter Sexual Selection and Sexual Dimorphism are covered in class as well Here Strier suggests that sexual dimorphism evolves by male competition or male coercion whereas you will notice that in l
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