Textbook Notes (368,241)
Canada (161,733)
Biology (311)
BIOL 1080 (54)
Chapter

Page 110 to 130 summary from textbook

6 Pages
66 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Biology
Course
BIOL 1080
Professor
David Dyck
Semester
Fall

Description
Bio Textbook Pages 110­130 Summary: Midterm Examinable Cell­Cell Communication Direct Communication Via Gap Junctions: • Conduit­like structures called connexions link adjacent cells, allowing the flow of ions and small molecules (nutrients) • Cells become electrically coupled so signals in one cell are transmitted to the neighbouring cells • Example: gap junctions in heart muscle cause cells to contract as a unit Indirect Communication Via Chemical Messengers: • Ligands­ molecules bind to proteins reversibly • One cell secretes a chemical into interstitial fluid and the target cell responds to the chemical messenger because its  receptors recognize and bind the messenger • Response in target cell is achieved through a variety of mechanisms called signal transduction Functional Classification of Chemical Messengers: Paracrines: • After secretion into interstitial fluid, paracrine can reach target cell by simple diffusion because they are close enough • Include growth factors, clotting factors, and cytokines (function in coordinating body’s defense against infection) • Example: Histamine secreted by mast cells, during inflammation histamine increases blood flow to affected tissues • Autocrines act on the same cell that secreted them Neurotransmitters: • Chemicals released into interstitial fluid by neurons, more specifically from the axon terminal • Presynaptic neuron­ releases neurotransmitter, Postsynaptic cell­ target neuron/gland/muscle cell • Neurotransmitter quickly diffuses over short distance from axon terminal and binds to receptors • Example: acetylcholine triggers contraction of skeletal muscle Hormones: • Chemicals released from endocrine glands into interstitial fluid and then diffuse into blood • Bloodstream distributes hormone all over body, but only cells with receptors for the hormone can respond • Example: insulin Chemical Classification of Chemical Messengers: Amino Acid: • Glutamate, Aspartate, Glycine, and GABA function as neurotransmitters in the brain • Lipophobic­ dissolve in water but do not cross plasma membranes Amine: • Includes a group of compounds called catecholamines­ dopamine & norepinephrine (neurotransmitters), epinephrine  (hormone) • Also neurotransmitter serotonin, thyroid hormones, and paracrine histamine • Most are lipophobic but thyroid hormones are lipophilic­ don’t dissolve in water but cross plasma membranes Peptides/Proteins: • Peptide­ chains of less than 50 amino acids, protein­ longer • Lipophobic Steroids: • Derived from cholesterol, function as hormones • Lipophilic Eicosanoids: • Include a variety of paracrines, they are lipids  • Lipophilic Synthesis and Release of Chemical Messengers: Amino Acids: • Glutamate and Aspartate are synthesized from glucose through a three­step series of reactions (glycolysis, pyruvic acid  to acetyl CoA, then Krebs cycle) • Glycine synthesized from 3PG • GABA from glutamate • Synthesized in cytosol then stored in vesicles Amines: • All except thyroid hormones are synthesized in cytosol by enzyme­catalyzed reactions in which one catecholamine  functions as the precursor for the next; can be stored Peptides/Proteins: • mRNA codes for amino acid sequence, translation of mRNA begins on ribosomes in the cytosol then finishes on the  rough endoplasmic reticulum • Propeptide is packaged in SER and transported to Golgi apparatus; can be stored Steroids: • Synthesized from cholesterol modification in a series of reactions catalyzed by enzymes in the SER or mitochondria • Synthesized on demand and released immediately Eicosanoids: • Synthesized on demand and released immediately • A membrane phospholipid is converted into arachidonic acid (precursor for all eicosanoids) which is converted to  eicosanoids via two pathways Transport of Messengers: Simple Diffusion: • Paracrines and neutotransmitters are quickly degraded in the interstitial fluid and become inactive, minimizing the  spread of their signalling Blood Transport: • Hormones are transported in the blood either in dissolved form or bound to carrier proteins • Peptides and amines except thyroid hormones are hydrophilic messengers and transport in dissolved form • Steroids are hydrophobic so they don’t dissolve well in blood and need carrier proteins • How long a hormone persists in the blood is measured in terms of half­life • Some hormones can dissolve and form an equilibrium in the blood stream­ they have a shorter half­life (minutes) than  the protein­bound hormones (hours) Signal Transduction Mechanisms Properties of Receptors: • Affinity­ strength of binding between a messenger and its receptor­ a single messenger can often bind to more than one  type of receptor as the receptors may have different affinities for the messenger • A single target cell may have receptors for more than one type of 
More Less

Related notes for BIOL 1080

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit