Chapter 4.docx

3 Pages
43 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Family Relations and Human Development
Course
FRHD 3150
Professor
Michelle Preyde
Semester
Winter

Description
Chapter 4 – Developing and Maintaining Behavior with  Conditioned Reinforcement Unconditioned and Conditioned Reinforcers  • Unconditioned reinforcer  (primary reinforcer)  ▯stimuli that are reinforcing without  prior learning or conditioning o E.g. food for a hungry person, water for a thirsty person, warmth for someone  who his cold etc.  • Conditioned reinforcer (secondary reinforcer)  ▯stimuli that were not originally  reinforcing but have become reinforcers by being paired or associated with other  reinforcers o E.g. praise, a picture of a loved one, books that we like to read, our favorite  television programs etc.  • Back­up reinforcer  ▯when a stimulus becomes a conditioned reinforcer through  deliberate association with other reinforcers, the other reinforcers are called back­up  reinforcers o Back­up reinforcers that give a conditioned reinforcer its strength can be either  unconditioned reinforcers or other conditioned reinforcers  OR • Meaningful objects, privileges, or activities that individuals receive in exchange for their  tokens o E.g. food items, toys, extra free time, outings o Success of a token economy depends on appeal of the back­up reinforcers o Individuals will only be motivated to earn tokens if they anticipate the future  reward represented by the tokens.  o A well­designed token­economy will use back­up reinforcers chosen by  individuals in treatment rather than by staff Tokens as Conditioned Reinforcers • Tokens  ▯conditioned reinforcers that can be accumulated and exchanged for backup  reinforcers • Token economy/token system  ▯behavior modification program in which individuals can   earn tokens for specific behaviors and can cash in their tokens for back­up reinforcers o Just about anything that can be accumulated can be used as the medium of  exchange in a token economy system • Tokens constitute one type of conditioned reinforcer but stimuli that cannot be  accumulated can also be conditioned reinforcers o E.g. common example is praise – praise is established as a conditioned reinforcer  during childhood, but it continues to be maintained as one for adults. When  people praise us, they are generally more likely to favor us in various ways than  when they do not praise us. Praise is a conditioned reinforcer, but it is not a token  reinforcer.  A bunch of praise statements cannot be saved up and exchanged for a  back­up reinforcer.  • Main advantage of using tokens or other conditioned reinforcers in a behavior  modification program is that they can usually be delivered more immediately than the  back­up reinforcer can – they help to bridge delays between behavior and more powerful  reinforcers • Conditioned punishment  ▯similar to conditioned reinforcement; just as a stimulus that  is paired with reinforcement becomes reinforcing itself, so a stimulus that is paired with  punishment becomes punishing itself. o E.g. “No!” and “Stop that!” are examples of stimuli that become conditi
More Less

Related notes for FRHD 3150

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit