Textbook Notes (368,460)
Canada (161,892)
Food Science (205)
FOOD 2010 (197)
Chapter

Unit 11

8 Pages
111 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Food Science
Course
FOOD 2010
Professor
Massimo Marcone
Semester
Winter

Description
Unit 11: Chapter 15 Summary 15.1 What is Sensory Evaluation? ­Sensory evaluation is the judgment of food quality as perceived by the human senses ­This does not just mean tasting… Implies all senses (texture, aroma, flavor, aftertaste,  presentation etc.) ­Sensory analysis means the same thing as sensory evaluation. Although it should be used  for statistical methods of sensory data A Scientific Method ­Sensory evaluation uses the scientific method  ­One uses the scientific method to identify problems, hypothesize the problem, and  experimentally strategizes a way to fix them. Data is collected from every experiment and  a conclusion is reached, either verifying the hypothesis or disproving it. A Quantitative Science ­Sensory evaluation is a quantitative science in which numerical data is collected  ­Human response stimuli are quantifiable ­ Sensory Science in the Food Industry  ­The main applications of sensory evaluation in the food industry are quality assurance  and product development ­Companies have teams which interact with other departments to make sure the their  product is quality assured  15.2 Sensory Odor, Flavor, and Mouthfeel Perception  ­Two types of senses involved in sensory perception: 1. Chemical­ taste and odor 2. Physical­ sight, sound, and touch Character notes­ sensory attributes that define a foods appearance, flavor, texture, and  aroma  Taste ­Taste occurs on the tongue Taste­ the sensation derived from food as interpreted though the tongue­to­brain sensory  system 4 primary tastes: 1) Sweet 2) Sour 3) Salty 4) Bitter There is a fifth one, umami. This means delicious, meaty and savory. ­There are receptor areas on the tongue which express maximum sensitivity to each of the  4 primary tastes. ­Taste involves detection of tastants by the taste buds (located on the surface of the  tongue) Tastants­ are food molecules that are perceived to have taste. They could be sour, sweet,  bitter, and/or salty. ­When tastants come in contact with a taste bud, it causes the release of neurotransmitters Taste buds­ epithelial receptor cells organized into clusters of 50­150, which are a part of  structures called papillae.  There are several different types of papillae: foliate, circumvallate, fungiform, and  filliform. Taste receptor cells act to detect taste stimuli and send messages to the brain. Newborn  babies have 8000­10000, and adults have 4000­6000. This later declines to 2000­3000.  In taste experiments PROP is used. Everyone has different taste levels. The three levels  are: “supertasters”, “medium tasters”, and “non­tasters” Transduction and Sensitivity  The tongue is linked to the brain through the central nervous system (CNS). Taste transduction­ the brains response to taste stimuli Tastants cause a depolarization. A depolarization is when positively charged ions  accumulate in the cell, making the membrane potential less negative. This causes a neural  signal­ the release of neurotransmitters to the brain. Odor Smell plays a major role in the enjoyment of food. Odor, fragrance and aroma are used interchangeably, although when describing an  undesirable smell, “odor” should be used. Components of aroma include olfactory sensation (rancid or fruity) and nasal feelings  (hot or cold).  The throat, oral cavity and nasal chambers are all connected. Olfaction only refers to the perception of odors by nerve cells in the nasal area. Odorants are sensed by the olfactory epithelium, the outer layer of receptor cells on the  roof of the nasal cavity. Odorant molecules are sensed by millions of cilia that cover the epithelium.  The interaction between odorant and receptor cell initiates a cascade of events that  produce an electrical signal (similar to taste transduction). Optimal contact time between odorant and receptor cell is 1­2 seconds. It takes 20  seconds for the receptor cell to fully recharge. There are two types of sensitivities: 1) the ability to detect something at low concentrations 2) the ability to differentiate between two odorants Flavor Flavor is caused by chemical stimulation of the taste buds, olfactory apparatus and organs  of feeling present within the mouth, throat, and nose.  Therefore food flavor is the overall impression combining taste, odor, mouthfeel factors,  and trigeminal perception.  Trigeminal nerve­ a nerve which runs through the entire facial area. The nerve endings  are located in the nasal and oral cavities and are responsible for “trigeminal perception”  Aftertase is different than actual taste sensation. It is residual taste sensations that linger  on your tongue after swallowing. Odor contributes to flavor Retro­inhalation plays a major role in flavor. It is the passage of flavor stimuli from the  mouth to the nose.  Mouthfeel Is the perceived sensation of food (tactile and thermal sensation) by the epithelial lining  of your mouth.  15.3 Sensory Texture and Colour Perception Sensory Texture Sensory texture deals with the structure and composition of food. The mechanism of  sensory texture isn’t completely understood due to the fact that other attributes such as  memory, sight, hearing and touch, effect it. Texture perception occurs whenever a food is chewed or a drink is swallowed. We  measure this by describing physical characteristics of the food.  Sensory texture includes different types of sensations: mechanical, geometrical, an
More Less

Related notes for FOOD 2010

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit