Textbook - Chapter 10 (Coming Apart - Divorce Experience)

80 views6 pages

Document Summary

Textbook: the family dynamic a canadian perspective fifth edition. Chapter 10: coming apart the divorce experience. Divorce the legal dissolution of a marriage. Divorced families add two or three phases to the life cycle: separation, perhaps remarriage, and finally, stabilization in a new family pattern. Marriage was a way to unite families, providing stability for society. Divorce was only for grave reasons (biological descent for inheritance means adultery was a threat but cruelty was considered part of family life). Laws were strongly influenced by the church of england in upper canada (ontario) and the roman catholic. Neither church recognized divorce so no divorce law existed. Brunswick allowed divorce in 1758 on grounds of adultery and desertion. Though we do not know how many were granted. Confederation in 1867, federal parliament gained exclusive authority in matters of divorce but allowed existing provincial laws to stand or change. Deserting family was easier than going through a legal divorce.

Get access

Grade+20% off
$8 USD/m$10 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Grade+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
40 Verified Answers
Class+
$8 USD/m
Billed $96 USD annually
Class+
Homework Help
Study Guides
Textbook Solutions
Class Notes
Textbook Notes
Booster Class
30 Verified Answers

Related Documents