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FRHD 3400 (100)
Chapter 9

FRHD 3400 Chapter Notes - Chapter 9: Genogram, The Counselor, Afrocentrism


Department
Family Relations and Human Development
Course Code
FRHD 3400
Professor
Anna Dienhart
Chapter
9

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Chapter 9 1
FOCUSING ANTICIPATED RESULT
Use selective attention to focus the
counselling session on the client,
theme/concern/issue, significant others
(partner/spouse, family, friends), a mutual
“we” focus, the counselor, or the
cultural/environmental context. You may also
focus on what is going on in the here and now
of the session.
Clients tend to focus their conversation or
story on the areas that the counselor responds
to. As the counselor brings in new focuses, the
story is elaborated from multiple perspectives.
If you selectively attend only to the individual,
the broader dimensions of the social context
are likely to be missed.
FOCUSING
- Counselling is, first and foremost, for the individual
- Attending to the theme, or central topic(s), of the session.
- Drawing out strengths from the client’s memory through listening to and focusing on the
theme, story, or concern
- The idea of person-in-community was developed from an Afrocentric frame by Ogbonnaya
(1994), who pointed out that our family and community history and experiences live within
each of us.
- In individual counselling, however, many client problems are caused by and related to issues
and events in the broader context (e.g. poor schools, floods, economic conditions), which can
be missed if you focus only on the individual and the first stories that you hear.
POTENTIAL COMMENTS AND QUESTIONS THAT ALLOW THE COUNSELOR TO
FOCUS THE SESSION IN A SPECIFIC AREA
-Significant others (partner, spouse, friends, family)
- “Nelida, tell me a bit more about your relationship with your family in Miami.”
- Your grandmother was very helpful to you in the past. What would she say to you about all
this?”
- “How are your friends helpful to you?”
-Mutual focus (“we” statements about client, therapist, or group) —> Early in the session
- “Nelida, you have something that’s been bothering you for over a year, but we will work
through this. What would be the best way for us to work together in therapy?
-Counselor focus (sharing one’s own experiences and reactions)
- “It really bothers me to hear what happened in that first class.”
- (Later) “I feel good to hear that you are taking charge of your Latina identity..”
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