Textbook Notes (367,906)
Canada (161,487)
POLS 2080 (26)
Adam Sneyd (20)
Chapter

POLSTextbook Summaries.docx

86 Pages
248 Views
Unlock Document

Department
Political Science
Course
POLS 2080
Professor
Adam Sneyd
Semester
Fall

Description
POLS*2080: Chapter One • Labelling plays two key roles: o They make existing practices appear legitimate o They shape the future of policy making  • Newly industrialized countries  o Used to be called “underdeveloped” or “third world”  o China, India, Singapore, etc.  o Referred to as an “emerging market”  o Determined by four criteria:  Manufactured goods contributing to 30% of GDP  Manufactured goods as 50% of exports  A shift in employment from agriculture to industry  Per capita income of $2000  o Just because the World Bank calls them developing countries doesn’t mean they’re necessarily making  progress  • Fourth World o Can denote the poorest of the poor states –failed states are bad for human well­being  o Can also refer to colonized aboriginal people  Growth • Development has usually been likened to economic growth  • Global inequality is seen to be the reason of a long period of different growth rates (Sachs) • When the GDP grows rapidly it’s usually due to natural resources or industrialization  o When countries reach a slowed –middle class –GDP it means they’ve reached a level of industrialization  • There is a general assumption that a trickle down will take place when a country’s growth increases  • Development for all countries was to mimic the development of the west • An issue with GDP/capita is that it relies on a government to collect the info o Tells us very little about the extent of poverty, etc.  • Development can’t only be GDP growth because of the fact that wealth rarely trickles down; the country will appear  to be “developed” but isn’t actually  Inequality • Distribution of income –refers to income inequality  o A measure of how the wealth of a country is distributed among the population  o Looks at where the wealth is centralized, what is the wealth gap, etc.  • You can measure the distribution of income in two ways: o Comparison of income earned by different strata of the population  o The Gini Coefficient (0 is a perfect score and means everything is equally distributed)  • Generally minorities within a population suffer from the most inequality  • Social capital: refers to the extent to which individuals are willing to co­operate in the pursuit of shared goals and is  thought to be essential to the development of civic and democratic culture  •  There are three predominant explanations for poverty in developing countries:  o Colonial rule: the rule was based on inequality, exploitation, and slavery o Characteristics of late industrialization: use of technology to limit workers o Inadequate social safety nets: or a bad tax system that doesn’t spread the wealth properly  • Absolute poverty o Being below the minimum level of income required for basic survival ($1.25/day) • Moderate poverty o Basic needs are met and survival is not threatened ($2/day) • Relative poverty o You’re able to maintain your physical survival but you’re excluded from your society o This could be not having a computer or cellphone, not being able to partake in sports, etc.  o Generally what exists is developed countries  • Poverty is not solely about money; it is also about social, political, and psychological factors  o Therefore ending poverty requires a lot more than an influx of economic aid  o This school of thought came about in the 1960s –“multi­dimensional”  o Seers  believed in six dimensions   Adequate money to cover survival needs   Employment   Improvement in the distribution of income   Education (specifically literacy)  Free political participation   National autonomy (no colonialism or coercion) o Goulet  Life sustenance   Self­esteem   Freedom  • Capabilities Approach –Amartya San o Development is both a rise economic growth and substantive freedoms o Believes that poverty is a series of “unfreedoms”  o “Unfreedoms” can include limited access to healthcare, services, education, etc.  o Lack of freedom can either be a process (systemic) or an opportunity (lack of food, etc.) o Poverty is cyclical –those who vote can obtain education, if you’re educated you can vote, etc.  o See page 14 for Harlem/Bangladesh example  Global Ethics and International Development • Western developed countries formed social supports because the free market left many vulnerable  o While this was mostly based on morality it was also aided by the push to avoid a “communist revolt” by  which people would support a communist movement to get more equality  • The idea of social assistance extending past national borders happened when anti­colonial revolutions in Africa and  Asia forced us to consider an international approach  • Many influences to produce international aid: o Self­interest (loans, good PR move, etc.) o Geo­political considerations  o Sense of obligation and guilt  • Global ethics is the shift from discussing national aid, social programs, etc. to discussing international programs  Cosmopolitan Arguments for Global Redistribution • Cosmopolitanism –the belief that we have an obligation to help those in underdeveloped nations as well as our own  o Justice is owed to all regardless of where they live, their race, gender, etc.  o Believe in a set of rights belonging to all human beings  • It’s important to note that just because you don’t believe in the importance of national borders that doesn’t make you a  cosmopolitan  o Libertarians see low value to borders but don’t believe in the notion of pan­human rights  • There are three justifications within cosmopolitanism o Consequentialist Ethic: assess whether an action is morally just on the basis of the goodness its outcome  produces  o Contractarian Ethic: moral norms are justified according to the idea of a contract or agreement (this idea is  somewhat reflected within Hobbes or Locke; those living within a society have the right to property, life, and  liberty)  o Rights Based Ethic: justifies moral claims on the basis of inherent fundamental rights or entitlements  (believe it is everyone’s responsibility to protect rights and standards) • Peter Singer believes in consequential ethics  o If we can prevent people from starving without compromising anything of equal moral value then we must do  it o Seen as the Mother Theresa approach because it requires you to give up everything until you’re in an equally  as bad situation as the person you’re trying to help  o Very idealistic   Singer suggests that in a realistic application maybe everyone be forced to give away a certain portion  of their money every year to charity  • Thomas Pogge is contractarian ethics o The main reason he supports moral duty is because westernized countries caused it through colonial rule (he  maintains that even if imperialism didn’t cause it directly we have profited from the fruits of exploitation)  o Believes an economic order is unjust if it causes inequality or human rights violations   Believes this to be true of the current world economy which keeps the rich people rich and the poor  people poor   Therefore Pogge believes our responsibility is based on our duty to not harm others  o Doesn’t buy the idea that national reasons (i.e. corruption, poor infrastructure, etc.) are the cause of poverty,  sees those problems as a part of a bigger picture  • Charles Jones is rights based o Believes that sustenance is a vital human right and therefore of moral importance  o Without food, shelter, etc. a person is inhibited from performing other rights  o To say the right exists implies corresponding duties   Not to contravene the right  To protect the right  To aid people in obtaining the right  o Favours  a redistribution of wealth  Arguments against Global Redistributive Justice • The two main arguments against cosmopolitanism are communitarianism and libertarianism  • Communitarianism –takes issue with the disregard for national borders  o Instead they believe that that political and social community are very important –they believe that issues can  only be fully grasped by those who are in the same society –believe citizenship is an extended kinship o Can also be called nationalists  o Similar ideas put forth by “skeptical realists”  They believe countries should (and do) pursue their own interests –a state would not consider morals  in redistribution  • Libertarianism believes that every human has the right to freedom and non­interference –the ability to pursue private  property  o Believe that taxation is “forced labour” –ergo, they don’t believe in redistribution  o They don’t make judgments based on outcomes; only procedures   If wealth is obtained justly then it is just, if poverty is obtained justly then it is just  Ethical Behaviour and the Development Practitioner • There is a belief that those working on the front lines must have a sense of morality and the ability to still be objective  and avoid severe guilt  o It is of the utmost importance is to not cause harm if you’re working the front lines  o They must be self­critical and provide their own checks and balances  • Positionality –the development worker must be aware of their social and power relationship in which they’re  embedded, particularly with those they’re working  o It is often hard to assess positionality as the worker may not understand the conflict they’re in • Workers are expected to appear and behave modestly in the communities they work in  o Observing and respecting traditions, customs, etc.  • “Development tourists” –those who jet in an out of areas with little understanding of the area and situations    POLS*2080: Chapter Two Imperialism and the Colonial Experience • Global North and Global South are the new terms to discuss those countries which appear more “developed” and  those which are “developing” or undeveloped.  o Although not technically divided by the equator the global south refers to countries that were created  (colonized) by European empires o There are exceptions to this rule such as the United States (which was once held by many European empires) • As the exploration of Asia developed there began to be more travel between the two spheres of the world (being  Europe and the East) European Expansion and Conquest • Spain and Portugal had only been established after Christians seized the Iberian Peninsula from the Muslim occupants  (13  century) o This spurred Portugal to “explore” Northern Africa –where they found Ceuta “the flower of all other cities of  Africa” o Ceuta had mass wealth because they could access many different trade routes for precious metals below the  Sahara in the Northern Mediterranean o The expansion was therefore one of political, religious, and economic motives  • When Spain and Portugal went to the Americas the other European countries quickly followed –they still maintained  their colonies in Africa and Asia  o It was harder to hold land in the Americas –they would gain it and quickly lose it   However their land in Africa and Asia only flourished and their investments there prospered and grew • The final push for Europe to colonize the rest of the world was one born in the Industrial Revolution –they were in  search of new markets of both consumers and investments (this is the Hobson­Lenin thesis) o This was necessary because most of Europe still used perfectionist trade policies  • Another focus says that there was both a political and economic push for the colonization of other areas  o Caused by “the great power struggle” between the empires of Britain, France, and Germany o They had recently found diamonds and gold in Southern Africa  o This was also spurred on by a nationalist attitude which developed in the late 19  century   This begs the question of why Belgium and Portugal ended up with colonies as they were small and  largely unimportant  • None of the explanations mention the “men on the spot” who acted on their own (sometimes against their country’s  official policy) to develop the empire further (called men on the spot because they were located in the country they  acted in) • Most scholars accept an element of all three views as the reason for development  • Imperialism –refers to the era of European expansion that began in the sixteenth century, when the European empires  began trade in the Americas and Asia (except for Algeria and South Africa, Africa was largely left untouched until the  last third of the 19  century, the period of high imperialism) th o Came into use in the late 19  century as a description of when colonies were ruled by one central authority in  the pursuit of economic gains  • Neo­colonialism –the economies of formally independent countries remain subject to the control of others, often their  former colonial rulers o Prior colonization of the country is not always necessary to develop neo­colonialism  o An example of this could be the United States having large amounts of control over the Middle East • What separates a group of people moving and resettling from colonialism? o Colonialism involves some sort of development or expansion plot and involves the rule of a group of people  over another people  Rival Empires of Trade • When Europe moved into the east it was already being used as a trading port the way of the Indian Ocean  • When Portugal arrived in South Asia in 1498, Europe soon moved in with Lisbon’s conquest of Goa in 1510 • Dutch, English, French move in to take some claim over Indian Ocean o Dutch and English create chartered companies  A company that received monopoly commercial rights from a state ruler for the specific purpose of  promoting trade and exploration in a geographic area. Served as an important aspect of European  expansion  o English East India Company –established in 1600, the precursor to the Hudson Bay Company (which was a  chartered company in North America in 1670) o French also established chartered companies for their land in the east and west  o Portuguese Crown maintained direct control over their eastern empire • The Dutch had the spice trade from South­east Asian islands (Malaysia and Indonesia) • Portugal had the west coast of South Asia • England focused control in India and South Asian coast (where they battled with the French for it) • The Mughal emperors favoured the competition because it gave them more leverage in negotiations for better prices  and terms of trade (something they could not do when it was only Portugal in control) Development of the Western World • In Central and South America the domination and enslavement of the indigenous peoples caused a population collapse  o This made the continuation of any existing political system nearly impossible –the institution of any political  system would have to be “cut from a whole cloth” • The “unintended” introduction of smallpox destroyed the populations of Meso­America  • The Spanish (in their quest for gold and silver) enslaved indigenous peoples for mining –working them to death  • In Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) they almost caused extinction –had 1 million in 1492 but by 1550 there  was nobody  • In Mexico the Aztec population fell from 25 million (1518) to 1 million (1605) • Due to the prospect of high wealth and the lack of people in the Americas the immigration rate increased  • The cultivation of sugar (and rum) became a staple in Brazil and the Caribbean Islands for the “triangular trade” with  Europe and Africa •  In the later 1600s the export of African slaves to the Americas began to provide labour for sugar, cotton, and tobacco • Toward the end of the 17  century the import of black slaves outstripped the immigration of European settlers and the  Americas became more dependent on slave labour • In South Asia the Europeans failed to dominate the native population  o They maintained their ability to keep equality in trade  o They had sizeable armies with land dominance o They severely restricted the powers of Europeans  o Very different than the Amerindians, whom the Europeans found uncivilized because of their communitarian  cultures and non­sedentary lifestyles  • Due to the many European nations angling for trading rights with the Indians they (Indians) were put at an advantage  • Mughal power in the region began to fade at the turn of the 18  century o Many sub­states formed within the former empire o Britain and France formed alliances with different sub­states for further their positions   This allowed them to get trade concessions that were profitable (such as allowances on exports and  duties) • Middle of the 18  century Britain and France started to seriously compete o Britain gains leg up with Bengal province in 1765  Used internal issues within Bengal province to make gains  Defeated the Mughal armies, became a very large force within India   Had access to all revenue and trade within Bengal province; the most productive in India • Military Fiscalism: using local revenue (in this case from the place they had dominated) to fund their military actions  • The English East India Company only ruled over a small portion of India directly but had a lot of power indirectly  through the region due to alliances with individual state rulers o Used the Bengal revenues to build their armies in that area, became the largest military force in India o They were able to form alliances easily because most leaders were only focused on their individual areas and  weren’t concerned with the overall balance of power or how they were affecting other places  • Forced out their competition in the area o French receded in the last third of the 18  century o Dutch East India Company dissolved in 1795 • While they gained geographic power they (EEIC) started to expand economic interests as well o English East India Company was no longer confined to import and export of goods th o They constructed a rail network in the middle of the 19  century  o Railway reduced costs and time it took to transport goods  o Due to the export­oriented nature of this (railways created for high­bulk and low­value goods) there was a  missed opportunity to properly develop the infrastructure of a country in order to bring the regions together  and complement each other’s economic sectors  o Profits left the country and went to Britain, leaving India exploited  “High” Imperialism in Africa • While the imperialism of South Asia was slow (lapsing almost three centuries between de Gama’s arrival and the  Company’s eventual domination of the region) the “development” of Africa was very fast  th o Last two decades of the 19  century saw the expansion from coastal enclaves to interior land­holdings (the  entire continent, not including Ethiopia) o Belgium, England, France, Germany, Portugal, Italy, and Spain (Italy and Spain not really though)  Established colonies  • Imperial powers in Europe brought in non­state actors through the use of charters for private companies to “break  ground” and take the first steps in colonization  o British South Africa Company (Zambia and Zimbabwe), Imperial British East Africa Company (Kenya),  Royal Niger Company (Nigeria), German East Africa Company (Tanganyika)  o France rented out sections of Africa to companies  nd o The Belgian government allowed for King Leopold 2  to rent out parts of DRC to companies for a portion of  profits   The government stepped in after international protests against human rights abuses  • Cecil Rhodes o Owner of the British South Africa company  o Diamond baron that seized Zambia and Zimbabwe  o Longest lasting charter company; ceded in 1923  • Early in the 20  century actual states took over the colonization process (all of the grunt work was done by private  companies) • There was an area of focus on the differences between  the ways of colonization between the French, English, and  Portuguese o The other countries were largely ignored because of their short­lived natures  • There was a believed difference between British indirect rule and French direct rule  o The Portuguese acted with a more violent and hands­on version of direct rule  o British Indirect Rule­ the way the British operated the military and taxation (as well as much economic  activity) but left the day­to­day ruling to pre­existing aristocracies that supported the British conquest  o It’s important to note that all conquest was performed with violence and the actual way of rule in the colonies  had more to do with when and where they colonized as opposed to the actual country that colonized them  • The focus on the way of ruling missed the point of the difference between the way policies were imagined and how  they were instituted  o It has been suggested that the British way of indirect rule was actually a result of their inability to break the  bonds of local African rulers  • By keeping local rulers in place where they could it saved the colonial powers from having to establish new forms of  government  o Saved expense of British administrators  o Avoided even more conflict and violence  • Hegemony on a shoestring­ the belief of colonial rulers that if they kept local rulers at the low rungs (ruling by local  African customs yet still enforcing colonial wishes) the government would be seen as legitimate by the people at large  • Colonialism was either a benefit or a detriment to African people depending on their societal status  o Local elites profited from taxation  o Overall, it just deepened the existing societal cleavages of wealth and status and created new cleavages in  indigenous societies Common Themes in the Colonial Experience • European faith in the essential cultural differences and in the superiority of European peoples, often used to  justify exploitative measures and violence  o “imperial boosters” rallied the cries for development of other areas with claims of inferiority of indigenous  peoples in Africa, Asian, and the Americas (social Darwinism) o Believed that people with darker skinned represented a primitive form of society that Europeans had  advanced past  This influenced the fact that people were able to excuse the destruction of their society as progress  and development in itself   This also influenced Europeans to believe it was their duty to transform “backward” societies and  help indigenous people  • Metropolitan states’ ambivalence regarding the overseas commitments of empire o The failure to create any real infrastructure or economy in the colonies, instead exploiting their raw goods for  export  o Even when Latin America was able to achieve independence Britain and the US continued to dominate trade  when they shifted their focus from geographic control  o The basis was laid for commodity production with little reinvestment in the local economies, creating future  weakness  • A movement, in the twilight years of colonial rule, towards the promotion of economic development in colonial  territories  o The push toward reinvestment and development in Africa (1930s)  o Believed economic development would cure the problems  o The institution of more political sovereignty at a local level  POLS*2080: Chapter Two Imperialism and the Colonial Experience • Global North and Global South are the new terms to discuss those countries which appear more “developed” and  those which are “developing” or undeveloped.  o Although not technically divided by the equator the global south refers to countries that were created  (colonized) by European empires o There are exceptions to this rule such as the United States (which was once held by many European empires) • As the exploration of Asia developed there began to be more travel between the two spheres of the world (being  Europe and the East) European Expansion and Conquest • Spain and Portugal had only been established after Christians seized the Iberian Peninsula from the Muslim occupants  th (13  century) o This spurred Portugal to “explore” Northern Africa –where they found Ceuta “the flower of all other cities of  Africa” o Ceuta had mass wealth because they could access many different trade routes for precious metals below the  Sahara in the Northern Mediterranean o The expansion was therefore one of political, religious, and economic motives  • When Spain and Portugal went to the Americas the other European countries quickly followed –they still maintained  their colonies in Africa and Asia  o It was harder to hold land in the Americas –they would gain it and quickly lose it   However their land in Africa and Asia only flourished and their investments there prospered and grew • The final push for Europe to colonize the rest of the world was one born in the Industrial Revolution –they were in  search of new markets of both consumers and investments (this is the Hobson­Lenin thesis) o This was necessary because most of Europe still used perfectionist trade policies  • Another focus says that there was both a political and economic push for the colonization of other areas  o Caused by “the great power struggle” between the empires of Britain, France, and Germany o They had recently found diamonds and gold in Southern Africa  th o This was also spurred on by a nationalist attitude which developed in the late 19  century   This begs the question of why Belgium and Portugal ended up with colonies as they were small and  largely unimportant  • None of the explanations mention the “men on the spot” who acted on their own (sometimes against their country’s  official policy) to develop the empire further (called men on the spot because they were located in the country they  acted in) • Most scholars accept an element of all three views as the reason for development  • Imperialism –refers to the era of European expansion that began in the sixteenth century, when the European empires  began trade in the Americas and Asia (except for Algeria and South Africa, Africa was largely left untouched until the  last third of the 19  century, the period of high imperialism) o Came into use in the late 19  century as a description of when colonies were ruled by one central authority in  the pursuit of economic gains  • Neo­colonialism –the economies of formally independent countries remain subject to the control of others, often their  former colonial rulers o Prior colonization of the country is not always necessary to develop neo­colonialism  o An example of this could be the United States having large amounts of control over the Middle East • What separates a group of people moving and resettling from colonialism? o Colonialism involves some sort of development or expansion plot and involves the rule of a group of people  over another people  Rival Empires of Trade • When Europe moved into the east it was already being used as a trading port the way of the Indian Ocean  • When Portugal arrived in South Asia in 1498, Europe soon moved in with Lisbon’s conquest of Goa in 1510 • Dutch, English, French move in to take some claim over Indian Ocean o Dutch and English create chartered companies  A company that received monopoly commercial rights from a state ruler for the specific purpose of  promoting trade and exploration in a geographic area. Served as an important aspect of European  expansion  o English East India Company –established in 1600, the precursor to the Hudson Bay Company (which was a  chartered company in North America in 1670) o French also established chartered companies for their land in the east and west  o Portuguese Crown maintained direct control over their eastern empire • The Dutch had the spice trade from South­east Asian islands (Malaysia and Indonesia) • Portugal had the west coast of South Asia • England focused control in India and South Asian coast (where they battled with the French for it) • The Mughal emperors favoured the competition because it gave them more leverage in negotiations for better prices  and terms of trade (something they could not do when it was only Portugal in control) Development of the Western World • In Central and South America the domination and enslavement of the indigenous peoples caused a population collapse  o This made the continuation of any existing political system nearly impossible –the institution of any political  system would have to be “cut from a whole cloth” • The “unintended” introduction of smallpox destroyed the populations of Meso­America  • The Spanish (in their quest for gold and silver) enslaved indigenous peoples for mining –working them to death  • In Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) they almost caused extinction –had 1 million in 1492 but by 1550 there  was nobody  • In Mexico the Aztec population fell from 25 million (1518) to 1 million (1605) • Due to the prospect of high wealth and the lack of people in the Americas the immigration rate increased  • The cultivation of sugar (and rum) became a staple in Brazil and the Caribbean Islands for the “triangular trade” with  Europe and Africa •  In the later 1600s the export of African slaves to the Americas began to provide labour for sugar, cotton, and tobacco th • Toward the end of the 17  century the import of black slaves outstripped the immigration of European settlers and the  Americas became more dependent on slave labour • In South Asia the Europeans failed to dominate the native population  o They maintained their ability to keep equality in trade  o They had sizeable armies with land dominance o They severely restricted the powers of Europeans  o Very different than the Amerindians, whom the Europeans found uncivilized because of their communitarian  cultures and non­sedentary lifestyles  • Due to the many European nations angling for trading rights with the Indians they (Indians) were put at an advantage  th • Mughal power in the region began to fade at the turn of the 18  century o Many sub­states formed within the former empire o Britain and France formed alliances with different sub­states for further their positions   This allowed them to get trade concessions that were profitable (such as allowances on exports and  duties) • Middle of the 18  century Britain and France started to seriously compete o Britain gains leg up with Bengal province in 1765  Used internal issues within Bengal province to make gains  Defeated the Mughal armies, became a very large force within India   Had access to all revenue and trade within Bengal province; the most productive in India • Military Fiscalism: using local revenue (in this case from the place they had dominated) to fund their military actions  • The English East India Company only ruled over a small portion of India directly but had a lot of power indirectly  through the region due to alliances with individual state rulers o Used the Bengal revenues to build their armies in that area, became the largest military force in India o They were able to form alliances easily because most leaders were only focused on their individual areas and  weren’t concerned with the overall balance of power or how they were affecting other places  • Forced out their competition in the area th o French receded in the last third of the 18  century o Dutch East India Company dissolved in 1795 • While they gained geographic power they (EEIC) started to expand economic interests as well o English East India Company was no longer confined to import and export of goods o They constructed a rail network in the middle of the 19  century  o Railway reduced costs and time it took to transport goods  o Due to the export­oriented nature of this (railways created for high­bulk and low­value goods) there was a  missed opportunity to properly develop the infrastructure of a country in order to bring the regions together  and complement each other’s economic sectors  o Profits left the country and went to Britain, leaving India exploited  “High” Imperialism in Africa • While the imperialism of South Asia was slow (lapsing almost three centuries between de Gama’s arrival and the  Company’s eventual domination of the region) the “development” of Africa was very fast  o Last two decades of the 19  century saw the expansion from coastal enclaves to interior land­holdings (the  entire continent, not including Ethiopia) o Belgium, England, France, Germany, Portugal, Italy, and Spain (Italy and Spain not really though)  Established colonies  • Imperial powers in Europe brought in non­state actors through the use of charters for private companies to “break  ground” and take the first steps in colonization  o British South Africa Company (Zambia and Zimbabwe), Imperial British East Africa Company (Kenya),  Royal Niger Company (Nigeria), German East Africa Company (Tanganyika)  o France rented out sections of Africa to companies  o The Belgian government allowed for King Leopold 2  to rent out parts of DRC to companies for a portion of  profits   The government stepped in after international protests against human rights abuses  • Cecil Rhodes o Owner of the British South Africa company  o Diamond baron that seized Zambia and Zimbabwe  o Longest lasting charter company; ceded in 1923  • Early in the 20  century actual states took over the colonization process (all of the grunt work was done by private  companies) • There was an area of focus on the differences between  the ways of colonization between the French, English, and  Portuguese o The other countries were largely ignored because of their short­lived natures  • There was a believed difference between British indirect rule and French direct rule  o The Portuguese acted with a more violent and hands­on version of direct rule  o British Indirect Rule­ the way the British operated the military and taxation (as well as much economic  activity) but left the day­to­day ruling to pre­existing aristocracies that supported the British conquest  o It’s important to note that all conquest was performed with violence and the actual way of rule in the colonies  had more to do with when and where they colonized as opposed to the actual country that colonized them  • The focus on the way of ruling missed the point of the difference between the way policies were imagined and how  they were instituted  o It has been suggested that the British way of indirect rule was actually a result of their inability to break the  bonds of local African rulers  • By keeping local rulers in place where they could it saved the colonial powers from having to establish new forms of  government  o Saved expense of British administrators  o Avoided even more conflict and violence  • Hegemony on a shoestring­ the belief of colonial rulers that if they kept local rulers at the low rungs (ruling by local  African customs yet still enforcing colonial wishes) the government would be seen as legitimate by the people at large  • Colonialism was either a benefit or a detriment to African people depending on their societal status  o Local elites profited from taxation  o Overall, it just deepened the existing societal cleavages of wealth and status and created new cleavages in  indigenous societies Common Themes in the Colonial Experience • European faith in the essential cultural differences and in the superiority of European peoples, often used to  justify exploitative measures and violence  o “imperial boosters” rallied the cries for development of other areas with claims of inferiority of indigenous  peoples in Africa, Asian, and the Americas (social Darwinism) o Believed that people with darker skinned represented a primitive form of society that Europeans had  advanced past  This influenced the fact that people were able to excuse the destruction of their society as progress  and development in itself   This also influenced Europeans to believe it was their duty to transform “backward” societies and  help indigenous people  • Metropolitan states’ ambivalence regarding the overseas commitments of empire o The failure to create any real infrastructure or economy in the colonies, instead exploiting their raw goods for  export  o Even when Latin America was able to achieve independence Britain and the US continued to dominate trade  when they shifted their focus from geographic control  o The basis was laid for commodity production with little reinvestment in the local economies, creating future  weakness  • A movement, in the twilight years of colonial rule, towards the promotion of economic development in colonial  territories  o The push toward reinvestment and development in Africa (1930s)  o Believed economic development would cure the problems  o The institution of more political sovereignty at a local level  POLS*2080: Chapter Three Theories of Development Introduction • A new phase of capitalist development (consisting of three stages) has begun [caused by the economic crash]: o The crash has discredited neoliberalism, as lack of regulation is what caused the abuse of power o The boom of “developed” countries has ended   Some of the developing countries have enjoyed impressive growth rates  o The emergence of leftist policies in Latin America   Flout the tenets of neoliberalism and put welfare at the centre of development  • Development theory must now undertake: o Assimilating the experiences of today’s fast­growing economies and centre­left governments o Rethink development in a longer term historical perspective (as something ongoing and existing since  colonial times and even before) o Reconsider the actual goals of development (what does “catching up” mean?) • It is generally accepted that the creation of rich and poor countries occurred with the emergence of capitalism and the  accompanying imperialism and colonialism  o Industrialisation caused the wealth gap to widen  o This caused the “development project” to come about after WW2 (the gap is higher today than it was in the  40s and 50s –rich countries 23 times richer than poor countries as of 2000) • Development suffered setback because o the gap between the rich and poor continued to widen  o whatever gains development made were rolled back due to neoliberalism (free markets, no interference) o development has been sidelined by globalization  o of the modest reforms of the UN Millennium Development Goals. • The post­development currents flatly reject development as a plausible goal for us to have  • The PPP (purchasing power parity) made underdevelopment appear to be a statistical illusion  o This suggested that the low wages in certain countries actually weren’t that bad because the people could buy  more with those low wages compared to those in developed countries  Development Avant la Lettre • The western idea of progress became widely accepted during the industrial revolution  o European countries progressed very quickly  o Before this economic and social changes had been slow, easily reversed, and at the expense of others o The IR took place in a capitalistic world –something new  • Capitalism: o It organized production units whose private owners had the capital to buy the means and materials of  production and  those who had no other means but to sell their labour and power on the market o Before capitalism markets had little influence over social product: it had been controlled by authoritarian  rulers and social customs  o Production and human productive capacity underwent an expansion with the focus of preserving capitalism in  all countries  o We saw a shift from agriculture to industry  • Limitations of capitalism o No increase in demand due to workers’ low wages o Required a constantly expanding world market through commerce or conquest o Created wealth in some societies and poverty in others o Subject to cyclical crises  Seen with the Depression and Recession  o Unjust, impersonal, and uncontrolled governance by institutions (i.e. businesses) • The current idea of “development” comes from the idea of prosperity that capitalism promised and the failure of it to  produce prosperity for most people in the world  o All credible and realistic sources of political thought look at capitalisms double­sidedness  • Regulation of capitalism o  Adam Smith  –society’s morality should guide the markets (which he saw as an “invisible hand” that  combined private efforts)  o  Hegel  –the state is an indispensable actor in correcting and opposing market forces o Regulation doesn’t inherently mean it’s socialist thought   The market fails so often in capitalism that the state has to be involved sometimes  o  Polanyi  –market failure is endemic to capitalism [since it treated land, labour, and capital as commodities]  therefore markets are unable to and have never been able to successfully manage economies  • Capitalism and the emergence of nation­states o Nations are the outcome of the uneven development of capitalism o Uneven capitalist development, reinforced by imperialism, brought not development but deprivation,  imposition, domination, and exploitation to less powerful peoples o The United States, Germany, and Japan became national states by refusing Britain’s economic and political  domination. They also rejected the British free trade ideology o National states resorted to politics to manage trade, protect key industrial sectors, and modernize the  agricultural sector o Politics became the means to reform the international division of labour o Today, developing countries criticize imperialism as an obstacle to development The Moment of Development • Before WW2 the main reason to support development was the quasi­racist view of the “white man’s burden”,  civilizing missions, etc.  • Afterward the view of development shifted to the recognition of the exploitation and oppression and the desire to help  poor countries “catch up” to the status of the industrialized countries  • Three massive changes produced and defined the moment of development  o The US emerged as the most powerful capitalist nation in the world   Came to account for half of the world’s production by 1945 (aided by the destruction in Europe after  the two world wars)  The US began to sponsor development programs in order to cut imperial powers down to size and to  develop the capitalist world economy (which would benefit them) o The Soviet Union emerged as an industrial power  Communism (and their state planning/involvement) helped them when the rest of the world  floundered  This forced the US to alleviate the poverty so that communism didn’t appeal to the poor countries o The push toward liberation and decolonization   The US consistently supported the end of decolonization after WW2 to cut down its rival powers and  act against the communist powers  o Countries such as Korea, Cuba, and Vietnam were the places where the US tried the hardest to eradicate  communism [the cold war turned hot]  • State direction of the industrialization process was vital to the development agenda  o This is important to note as populist, post­modern, and neoliberals often portray industrialization as negative  to poor countries  • Development happened because of the confrontation between capitalism and communism (as well as their interaction)  o The failure of capitalism and the success of communism during the Depression  • Interwar Consensus  o The ills of capitalism could be remedied by planning, state ownership, a large state role in the economy, and  by making it more egalitarian through welfare measures • Keynes believed that the government should be involved in the economy only during the downturns –bolster the  economy through spending and social programs  o Less radical than the Soviet­style involvement  • New trade and finance governance was created through the IMF, World Bank, and the General Agreement on Tariffs  and Trade (GATT) o Designed to enable the national economic management required for welfare states as well as development  • Why call it third world? o Balance between the developed, capitalist world (first) and the communist (second) in international politics  o Balance between the political weakness of capitalist forces and the strength of leftist movements domestically  Disputing Development Development Economics  • The first theory of development (in a long line) that followed WW2 • Mainly marked by Keynesianism  o Saw capital crises as products of cyclical deficits of demand  o acceleration of growth through foreign capital and macroeconomic policies o Increasing the level of state spending and credit at the beginning of the downswing to keep investment  consistent and to even out any decline that may occur  o The larger role of the state to provide social services for citizens and the ownership of key industries  • W. A. Lewis: as agrarian economies with a surplus of labour industrialize, labour becomes scarce and wages higher • “launching a country into self­sustaining growth is a little like getting an airplane off the ground”  Modernization Theory • While most developing countries grew none of them were projected toward self­sustaining growth  • Modernization theory supplemented economics with sociological and political theorization in order to understand the  preconditions and obstacles for development  o Changed focus from just economics to modernization of traditional societies  • Walt Rostow’s Stages of Economic Growth was an historical interpretation of industrializationSocieties went through  five stages: 1. traditional society: low levels of technology 2. pre­conditions for take­off: creation of a national state, trade expansion, and increases in investments 3. take­off: higher productivity in industry and agriculture than population growth 4. drive to maturity: greater technological development and integration into the world economy 5. high mass consumption society: higher incomes and consumption beyond basic needs • Talcott Parsons’ Pattern Variables: traditional versus modern societies • Modernization theory focused on local or national obstacles to modernization while ignoring the history of  colonialism and imperialism. • It assumed transition from traditional to modern society was inevitable and imminent. • It assumed the end point of the transition is democracy • They often identified closely with the US and World Bank development policy o The US government would often fund them to study areas of the world where they were involved  • Samuel Huntington’s Politics of Order: The most important distinction among countries is not their form of  government but the degree of government.  o e.g., the ‘modernization’ of Vietnam through ‘forced urbanization’ –deforestation and bombing  • They exhibited anti­democratic tendencies  o Case in point: democracy replaced with military authoritarianism Dependency Theory • Originated in Latin America in the 1960s • Claims that lack of development is due to neo­colonialism (‘informal imperialism’) • Criticizes modernization theories’ assumptions of what developed means  • Focuses on the ‘capitalist world system’ rather than on single countries  • Argues that, rather than focusing on underdevelopment as an ‘original stage’, attention must be paid to a single and  integrated historical process which produced different outcomes for different parts of the world system • Argues that it was impossible for traditional societies to catch up to modern ones o It even rejected the use of “traditional” and “modern”, instead saying “core” and “periphery” • Claims that the answer to underdevelopment is a revolution of a socialist character • Claims that the elites in traditional societies collaborate in the underdevelopment of their own countries • Raùl Prebisch and the Economic Commission for Latin America o There was a core and a periphery and by continuing to encourage trade between the two, inequalities would  continue to grow  When trade between the core and Latin American countries was disrupted during the world wars the  Latin American countries diversified their economies and industrialized  o Took issue with conventional trade theory –which said that peripheral countries would benefit from the  technological advances of the core countries and would reduce the prices of industrial goods for periphery  countries faster than would happen otherwise  Said that industrial countries would keep prices high and reap the rewards for themselves  • Paul Baran  o Underdevelopment is the product of capitalism, as surplus from underdeveloped countries is transferred to  developed countries o Capitalism and imperialism go hand in hand o Socialism is needed to end capitalism and imperialism • Types of dependency o Development is possible by removing some external obstacles (ECLA). o  F. H. Cardoso and E. Faletto : Development is possible via Associated Dependent Development (Peter Evans’s  Triple Alliance) o  A. G. Frank : No development is possible within the world capitalist system and without a socialist revolution o  Samir Amin : Development is possible through selective delinking from the world capitalist system combined  with an internally generated process of capitalist accumulation o  Immanuel Wallerstein : Focused on the unequal development within the world capitalist economy (comprised  of a core, semi­periphery, and periphery) Marxism  • Understood capitalism to be contradictory and unjust, exploitative, and crisis­prone  • Marxist critique of dependency o Capitalism refers to social relations of production and not only trade or exchange o Not all colonies’ incorporation into the world trade system created capitalist development o Agrarian societies’ incorporation into the world economic system did not necessarily lead to the development  of capitalist relations of production o Ernesto Laclau’s ‘articulation of modes of production’ approach o Dependency’s misunderstanding of Marx’s notion of exploitation o Failure to explain the development of East Asian economies and other “third world” countries after the 1970s Neoliberalism  • It contested development strategies and goals • It opposed state intervention to regulate markets • It pushed for market­friendly policies • It caused massive unemployment and growing inequality and poverty in developed countries • It caused even worse effects in developing countries: o used the state to re­engineer economies in favour of private capital o favoured foreign capital over domestic capital o favoured financial capital over productive capital o it attacked Third World countries’ industrialization efforts o it made debt repayment harder by lowering exports’ prices o it caused massive transfer of capital from the Third World to the First World o it blamed Third World governments for the ‘lost decade’ of development o it caused ‘the end’ of development as originally conceived  Arguments that industrialization was not the future for the third­world. There was instead a belief that  they should stay where they have a comparative advantage, such as agriculture, because they would  do well there  • With the introduction of globalization in the 1990s neoliberalism was reinforced and the nation­state was announced  as passé • The US saw many third­world countries as “failed states” that they had to take care of, often using violence and war • Even in third­world countries governments turned toward neo­liberalism with the limitation of government  involvement  Developmental States • Development theory scholarship reiterates the crucial role of the State in early and recent industrial success stories • Development theory scholarship converges with Marxism on the class character of the State • Development theory scholarship reiterates dependency theories’ explanation about the role of Western imperialism Conclusion: Whither Development? • The current recession in the First World has fully discredited neoliberalism o The lack of regulation surrounding banking and the markets is exactly what lead to the crash  • Today, China, India, Brazil are becoming the new centre of gravity in the world economy o Their success allows now to test the merits of Marxist and ‘developmental state’ theoretical frameworks in  understanding and rectifying underdevelopment Theory/Theme Emergence Thinkers Discipline The Problem The Solution Development  1950s Lewis,  Keynesian Economics Low­level  Injection of capital  Economics  Rosenstein­ equilibrium and management to  Roden put economy on a  growth path Modernization  Late 1950s Rostow, Shils,  Weberian/Parsonian  Traditional  Modernization  Theory Pye, Almond,  Sociology society through diffusion of  Huntington modern values and  institutions Dependency  1960s Cardoso,  Prebisch­Singer  Dependency  Delinking, fully or  Theory Frank,  thesis, Latin  within a world  partially, or socialism Wallerstein,  American approach capitalist  Amin system Marxism 1970s Brenner,  Marxist theory of  Articulation of  Development of  Warren modes of production modes of  capitalist relations of  production  production/socialism Neoliberalism 1970s Bauer, Balassa,  Neo­classical thought State  Free markets Kreuger, Lal intervention Developmental  1970s Amsden,  Listian neo­ Free markets State the management  States  Haggard,  mercantilist political  of the economy to  Chang, Reinert economy  increase productivity,  equality, and  technological  upragding POLS*2080: Chapter Six Globalization and Developing Countries • Fernando Henrique Cardoso o One of the founders of the dependency school o Brazilian president from 1994­2002 o Thought that capitalism had won when the Cold War ended, no alternative but to get with it o Believed that past theories of development were dead and buried and the only way to develop was to accept  the current macroeconomic structure of the world including the policies of the World Bank and IMF o Under his ruling the social and economic priorities of Brazil refocused to adjust to the needs of the  international markets o The obvious tension in this came from the fact that Cardoso had once argued that the South needed to delink  from global economic structures Success Stories • The World Bank has provided a lot of data showing that if developing countries integrate themselves into the world  marketplace (through globalization) they will prosper  • East Asian Miracle: o East Asia is the ideal model for globalization development  o Countries that open their borders to the movement of goods and people will find competitive niches and  attract foreign capital   The Bank believes this is demonstrated by countries such as China and South Korea who have  emerged as key players in the world economy  o East Asian countries account for 57% of the world’s population living in poverty  However they’ve been able to reduce their population of people living in poverty by 23% in less than  25 years  o China is currently on track to become the largest exporter in the world, boasting a healthy economy and 9% of  world exports Time and Space Contracting • David Harvey o Believes that modern capitalism has integrated the world much more profoundly than ever before  o Time and space are no longer seen as an obstacle  due to modern communications and transportation  o This makes him believe that the divide between the North and South has been blurred   The way that wealth and poverty are distributed amongst sectors and regions has shifted greatly with  these developments Trade and Growth • Exports from developing countries have been growing faster than exports from other places in the world  o Even after the economic crash the countries were still making gains  • With international organizations pushing for increased liberalization of developing economies trade is expanding  faster than production  o The theory is that the soothing influence of the market will help every country find its own niche where  everyone will experience success  • The World Bank believes that development by globalisation is evident in the fact that the growth of the poor nations  has surpassed that of the rich nations for the first time in modern history  o They believe the population living on less than $1.50/day has halved since 1981  o These trends are the most evident in countries that adopted globalisation policies the most eagerly and quickly  o The growth of exports from developing countries is mostly in manufactured goods   This means that the country is both making and exporting the goods, as opposed to when developing  countries used to simply export raw materials to be used by developed nations  • Investment in developing countries has risen; they will receive more than half of the FDI (foreign direct investment)  in the next decade  o However most of this is concentrated in China, India, Brazil, and South Africa  Who is Benefiting? • Even if an area has a high amount of exports it doesn’t necessarily mean they’re rich; Sub­Saharan Africa has a high  ratio of exports but since they’re largely cheap products then it doesn’t benefit them  • Only 12 developing countries are actually participating in the expansion of trade  • The experiences of East Asia and Latin America are examples of contrasting looks at how “development” and poverty  can co­exist  o When development happens it usually just strengthens the divide between the rich and the poor because the  poor don’t have access to the opportunities  • The gap between the rich and the poor is growing significantly in developing countries  • Amartya Sen o Economist from India o Critical of World Bank and IMF policies  o Believes that while wealth is being created it is not being distributed and shared fairly  o The poorest 40% accounts for 5% of global income while the richest 20% accounts for 75% of global income  Sub-Saharan Africa on the Margins • More than 30% of Africans live on less than $1.50/day  • The growth of Africa stagnated while other countries developed from 1960­2000 • The UNDP had an optimistic report for Africa pre­2008 crash  o Many countries were able to fund social services and pursue the Millennium Development Goals  • The critical response to this is that the growth wasn’t caused be real economic development and simply the thirst for  Africa’s natural resources among the developed nations (and China)  • Africa accounts for less than 1% of the world’s GDP o While the aid being sent to Africa has been consistent and high the debt they’ve been carrying (and trying to  pay off) has increased  China: Exception or Trend? • China has surpassed Japan as the third largest economy in the world o Poverty is down, jobs are being created, investment is increasing, population shift to the cities (allowing for  better access to education, health care, and jobs) • While there has been growth there has also been criticism o There has been speculation that China’s quasi­communist past will have a lasting impact on the country and  its development  o There is also criticism that China’s growth is unsustainable; there’s an impending energy crisis coupled with a  lack of food and water which will leave the large population of the country in a lurch  o Environment degradation, class polarization, flailing governance  What is New? • Information Capitalism: world economics is no longer led by production as much as it is control of the flow of  strategic info, processes, patents Who Makes the Decisions? • Globalisation is leading to the nation­state losing parts of its sovereignty (as an economic actor) to multinationals and  financial institutions  • The political structures inherited from the nation­state are becoming obsolete  o Markets are calling the shots, not countries  o Many of the policies concerning world politics policies are decided by companies and banks, often including  the rich countries but almost always leaving out the poorest countries   The IMF and World Bank are governed by the riches countries who all have different levels of voting  power based on how much money they have (this is different than the UN which gives equal footing  to all members)  • The governments of smaller, less developed countries are both losing influence internationally and at a national level  o This generally ends in a breakdown, seen in the Balkan and sub­Saharan regions  • The conflict between public and public, and economic and private, creates a power vacuum  o The UN has become marginalized  • Agreements between large countries and corporations bypass the UN (such as NAFTA and the WTO)  Another Globalization? The New Face of Imperialism? • There’s a belief that this is simply another way for the Global North to extend its reach into the South and exploit  them  • The core of the wealth is in the triad: Western Europe, Japan, and North America  o 15% of the population but 75% of the world’s wealth  o There’s a radicalist belief that the success in East Asia is a result of an agreement within the triad and keeps  the poverty and exploitation at the periphery –countries that are still under the thumb of the North  Beyond the Triad • China, Brazil, and India have become key economic players, even though they are still considered the South for the  most part  o China has adopted more clout to influence decisions on the world stage, seen in its handling of situations with  North Korea, Sudan, Iran, etc.  • China is trying to promote an alternative integration program in Asia o Using the ASEAN to use free trade agreements to link all members  o Working on the Shanghai Cooperation Organization to bring together many members of the former Soviet  Union, India, and other peripheries to create a group outside of the control of the triad  • BRICS –Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa  o Informal intergovernmental panel focused on how to renegotiate agreements to better serve them  o They have 25% of the world’s land mass, 40% of the population, and $15 trillion in GDP  o Wishes to reform the WTO so that Southern interests are better reflected and integrated in the mainstream  ‘Rebels’ with a Cause • Counties such as Venezuela, Bolivia, and Ecuador want to reverse the policies of trade liberalization and defy the  Washington Accord  o This clashes with Brazil (afraid it will establish itself as a sub­imperial power within South America)  • Brought together ALBA to support one another in various fields and to give themselves more power  Movement from Below • There’s an emergence of a global civil society pursuing an anti­globalization movement and various other protests and  movements aimed at bettering the world  • From Chiapas to Seattle  o In 1994 (southern Mexico) an indigenous community (Zapatistas) emerged to protest NAFTA and the policies  attached to the globalization process   Revolt led by farmers and indigenous people who had been left out of the political discussions   They didn’t want to take power, they wanted to change it o In 1999 NGOs, a combination of teamsters and turtles (unions and environmentalists), picked up that cry to  demolish many aspects of globalization  • The Spirit of Porto Alegre  o Brazil –since the early 1980s  o Asking for “another” globalization  o By the 2000s it had established itself as a legitimate movement and as an influential player in the political  scene  o Pursued the idea of a world meeting of civil society groups to achieve alternatives for the current system   World Social Forum (WSF) in Porto Alegre in 2001   Currently 500 000 small and large social movements participate (although not all together, they are  decentralized into different levels of government, areas, and concerns) o In Porto Alegre alternative social and political views had been ruling municipal affairs for more than a decade  o The WSF wanted a fair trading system that guaranteed full­time employment, food security, and local  prosperity  The Economics of After-Globalization • There’s a belief that the “hyper­growth” is not sustainable  • The International Forum on Globalization pursues the belief that the economy should be geared to meet human  genuine needs without jeopardizing the ability of future generations to do so Chapter Seven: State of the State • State: an entity with monopoly over the means of force within a designated territory that it controls, enjoying  legitimate support for that monopoly from the majority of the population residing in the territory and recognition of its  control by other states, and is empowered by the population with making public decisions o This is considered a Eurocentric concept of the state created by people who see it as a normative experience • Most European states have developed their respective identities over 1000+ years  o Because of this the state in the developing world is seen as illegitimate and artificial because its historical  experience was through colonialism rather than experiences over time • The developing state can still makes decisions however it lacks the legitimacy that is afforded to developed states  • The economies of colonies were set up with mercantilism in mind, something that has continued through neo­ colonialism despite the removal of actual colonial rulers  o This is seen through the continued military involvement of the former colonial rulers and the developing  governments that are full of corruption  o There was a combination of force and co­optation used to extract resources and control populations  o While under neo­colonial influence it is nearly impossible to create sustainable development  Defining the State’s Role in Development • There are two distinct views on this: the compradorial view and the Weberian view • Compradorial state view:  o Sees the post­colonial state as run by an elite ‘bought out’ by and/or in alliance with foreign governments,  investors, or military or tied to the local resource­owning and internationally oriented capitalist class o Coined by “radical” Marxist thinkers  • Weberian (Max Weber) view:  o In contrast, sees the modern state guided by a rational­purposeful nationalism. That is, colonialism can no  longer prevent the developing state from leading  a government that is purposeful, rational, and legitimate State Capacity and Autonomy • State capacity is used to suggest that developing states may not be as capable of weighing technical decisions as their  counterparts in the North: they lack well­trained personnel, up­to­date equipment, and have considerably smaller  budgets o An example of this could be that developing states seem to lack meritocratic hiring practices • State autonomy is used to assess the degree of ‘insulation’ a state has from social and external forces • Embedded autonomy is a term used by Peter Evans to refer to states that develop strong networks ties with foreign  and domestic elites yet manage to retain some degree of autonomy for the pursuit of national interest • Miguel Angel Centeno argued that a lack of state autonomy (specifically in Latin America) may be due to the absence  of a strong sense of nationalism  o This is contrasted by the United States which has things such as their civil war (which worked) and the  Declaration of Independence to support their national identity  Central Debates about the Role of the State in Economic Development The Push for Early Industrialization th • Broken down into Keynesianism and neoliberalism in the 20  century  • The concern with “modernization” was that it would free up so much labour that it would drive the actual profitability  of the labour to rock bottom prices  o Lewis believed this to be a good thing because that would attract more industry and spur development,  leaving the state out of the equation entirely  o There was little proof of this happening post­WW2 in Asia and Africa so Keynesianism took over • In the 1960s the idea of modernization was directly linked to modernization –the goal was to create a healthy and  thriving middle class  • State­sponsored industrialization was linked to Soviet Union and China, a model later rejected due to the flaws of  socialist regimes –the standard of living was considered far below that of Western countries  o There was also a lot of repression in socialist states  o Even in communist states such as China there was an elite that lived a better life • Industrialization in Latin America took the form of Import Substituting Industrialization (structuralism), a middle  ground between market and state involvement o Industrialization through market and ‘healthy’ state involvement was supported by the ‘Structuralist School’  (UN­ECLA) led by Raul Prebisch and Latin American economists o He argued that the state was needed in the beginning to facilitate the creation of the industrialized state – believed manufactured goods superior to commodities because commodities never became more sophisticated  • Prebisch called for regional integration to achieve a more efficient industrial sector –southern countries sell to each  other so they can build up their economies to compete with the North • At the time, industrialization meant investment in large­scale projects, such as airports and hydroelectric dams –a “big  push” supported by Rosenstein and Rodan  o Hirschman’s idea of “linkages” states that one industry (such as an automotive industry) props up mining,  steel, rubber, manufacturing, retail, etc. and that it may be impossible for the state to create all of this on its   own  • By 1970, disillusionment followed the state’s role in Latin America’s development experience • Gerschenkron believed that due to a lack of protectionism in the banking systems of developing states they lost a lot  of money and educated people to foreign countries –large scale access to higher education would solve this  • The OPEC caused tailspin of the economy in the 70s and 80s led to disillusionment with Keynesianism which ushered  in neoliberalism  Rise of and Justification for Neoliberalism • Market­based economics appealed to southern policy makers because it seemed to offer a solution to the constraints  on spending created by the debt crisis • Challenges to neoliberalism focused on the East Asian ‘Economic Miracle’ and the role the State played in making it  possible, a view opposed by the World Bank which insisted on the role played by market forces o For the most part income inequality has grown hugely outside of the very few positive examples of  neoliberalism –In Ghana and Jamaica it led to short term currency stability by long term stagnation and worse  equality  o In East Asia we saw a developmentalist state that guided much of the business and created competition within  its local industries and focused its money from exports into investing in new industry  From Neoliberalism to Governance • Economists look now at ‘institutions’ in order to explain the failure of market reforms. What went ‘wrong’ with  neoliberal economic reforms was not the need to reduce the role of the state and allow market to make decisions, but  simply an underestimation of the importance of state regulation for the minimization of transaction costs o This gives way to the second generation of neoliberal reforms in which the state reduces transaction costs,  enforces contracts, eliminates property rights, etc. yet still allows the markets to rule  • The World Bank refers to this as governance: how well states function in managing markets. It thus points to the need  to reform the state following the crisis of the same state caused by neoliberal market­friendly policies • Even in welfare programs and utility provision privatization, sub­contracting, and public­private partnerships are  viewed as superior to Keynesianism  Rent Seeking and State Capture: The Battle against Corruption • Many thought that the state was the problem not the solution to economic development • The term ‘rent­seeking’ describes how states could become ‘captured’ by special interest groups in the private sector,  leading to policies that benefit a privileged minority • Neoliberals in the South demonstrated how their form of governing could protect the state, however all of the main  proponents of neoliberalism in Latin America were later brought up on corruption charges • State capture now includes the idea that powerful private interests, such as foreign corporations, can undermine the  ability of the state to pursue national policies in the collective interest and thereby undercut the democratic process • The focus on good governance also targets the elimination of corruption –this has led to the creation of many indices  and ranking scales to prevent corruption  o Corruption of a country is now measured by Transparency International, the World Bank, and the World  Economic Forum, with ‘information’ provided by international business executives • Clientelism: practice of favouring particular groups and which may be perfectly legal (unlike corruption) but inimical  to social interests Governance as a Process of Democratization • The term ‘governance’ is also used by non­economists to highlight the view that the ‘crisis of the state’ stems from the  fragility of democracy, as well as the dissatisfaction with the ability of democracies to address long­standing structural  inequalities • Governance also means enhancing ‘civil society’ participation in collective decision­making through state co­ ordination • The Southern governance crisis is linked to the fact that the democracy is fragile and it’s failing to solve long­standing  issues related to equality  • The original meaning of governance –the economic focus –has been matched with the idea that there should be a state  led civil society aspect that enhances the ideas of citizens  • For economists, state­coordination should be with the private sector • Social capital refers to the claim that greater civic and political engagement leads to higher economic growth and  development • Civil society participation thus get to have a say in the decision­making process • Strong critiques suggest that this type of governance (one requiring new public management) is impossible, given the  structural inequalities in the South • Today’s global financial crisis has further polarized the governance debate, with some deriding the expansion of the  state while others blame the neoliberal economic model as highlighting the need for even greater state intervention Globalization and the Role of the State • As the world ‘globalizes’ there is concern about representative accountable states that are engaged with equity as well  as growth • ‘Globalization’ means increasing economic and social transactions and ease of communications across states • The Internet demonstrates how states are losing control over information and communication • Globalization led to the dominance of large corporations with no real national identity, few benefits to the home  country, and which drive hard bargains with developing states that want to attract their activities • The globalization experience has been less than stellar in finance, as developing markets are exposed to the  ‘contagion’ caused by financial collapse elsewhere –seen with the Russian collapse of 1997  • Free trade agreements (like NAFTA) have been controversial because it’s hard to measure the effects, however most  agree that the developing state has weakened in globalization  • Some even argue that the state is dying not only in the developing world but also in the developed world, and cite as  evidence the effects of diminishing social welfare protection in many parts of the world • Others argue that the state is more important than ever: it still determines rules for foreign investment and trade within  its territory; signs international trade and investment agreements, and can improve a country’s competitiveness  through strategic investment in infrastructure and people • The debate about the role of the state in development continues unabated –we know nothing, that chapter was a waste  of time Chapter Eight: National Development and Bilateral Aid Clarifying the Terminology • Donors: providers of development assistance (although lenders is more appropriate given their habits of giving out  loans)  • Bilateral Aid: a country giving aid money directly to another country –government to government  • Multilateral Aid: a country giving aid money to an institution such as the UN or World Bank  • Another term used for “foreign aid” is official development assistance (ODA)  o They are used interchangeably however they differ in their purpose: foreign aid can be used for a multitude of  things whereas ODA must be official funding geared toward economic development and welfare of the state  • Official Development Assistance (ODA): The flows of official financing administered to promote developing  countries’ economic development and welfare, which are concessional in character, and with a grant element of at  least 25 percent • Aid from individuals, foundations, NGOs, or private corporations does not count as ODA • Military assistance and export credits to promote donors’ sales of good are not ODA • Official Assistance: Aid to countries not classified as ‘developing’ (e.g., Russia) • Donors’ debt relief to developing countries does not qualify as aid • Donor countries’ peacekeeping costs do not qualify as aid • Loan: Donation that must be repaid but in terms better than commercial transactions to be considered ODA • Tied Aid: The donor’s economy benefits from the ODA it provides Overview of Aid Donors • Most donors (24) belong to the DAC—the Development Assistance Committee—which is part of the OECD (Paris) • In 2008, total ODA was equivalent to private flows (foreign direct investment) to developing countries: US $121  billion • Some OECD countries that give aid, as do China and Arab countries, are not part of the DAC  o China has given African countries many loans and investments, something that technically is aid but is not  considered ODA –the conditions of China’s aid are murky and unclear  • Countries that aren’t a part of OECD also give aid, such as Cuba, Taiwan and Venezuela  • Foreign aid increased between 1970 and 1990, slowed down in the early and mid­1990s due to ‘aid fatigue’, and rose  again after 2000 (mainly as ‘debt relief’) • In 1970, the UN General Assembly approved a resolution that ODA would be expected to be at least 0.7 percent of a  donor country’s GNP (Gross National Product)  • However, by 2008, DAC was still just 0.31 percent of donors’ GNP • More generous countries are Sweden (0.98%), Luxembourg (0.97%), Norway (0.88%), and the Netherlands (0.80%) • The USA, the larger donor in dollar terms, is actually the least generous in relative terms (0.19%) along with Japan  (0.19%) • Non­DAC contributions accounted for roughly $15 billion  Donor Motivations • To help the less fortunate abroad, whether this is motivated by charity or solidarity o This is naively idealistic  • To serve the self­interests of donor countries, especially in terms of pursuing foreign policy objectives, including  diplomatic, commercial, and security interest • The self­interest principle is that foreign aid can be used to help people abroad but that the selection of recipients and  aid modalities should prioritize instances where it maximizes the direct and indirect benefits to the donor country o This principle is criticized as foreign aid hides the pursuit of naked self­interest behind claims that it is aimed  at helping others • During the Cold War, foreign aid was manipulated into preventing the expansion of the Communist ‘threat’ –seen in  the insurgence of aid toward countries in Latin America and Asia, where the fear was the most present  • Today, ODA is used to promote neoliberal economics, democracy, good governance, and the development of the  private sector. o Humanitarian assistance, on the other hand, best reflects principle of selflessness • Another reason for disbursing foreign aid is to see it as compensation for present and past injustices, whether today’s  unjust international economic system, or colonial exploitation • Another reason for foreign aid is to see it as an international obligation under international human rights law: UN’s  right to development is universal o Everyone has the right to an education and to earn a livelihood  o When a country is unable to provide these human rights because of a situation out of their control then it  could be argued that the responsibility falls to the developed countries • At what point is a developing country to blame for their own government’s shortcomings, like corruption or misuse of  funds? –can it really always be on the developed?  Characteristics of Donors • Individual donors choose to focus aid on a particular region on the basis of geography, security interests, or former  colonial ties • Some donors channel most of their aid through multilateral agencies (e.g., Italy’s 62%), but in doing so they lose  some of their control over where and how their aid is spent • The United States prefers to disburse aid mainly on a bilateral basis through two aid agencies: o United States Agency for International Development (USAID­1961) –“providing development assistance”  o The Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC­2004) –has the aim to foster economic growth through freeing  markets and democracy  • USA aid is motivated by both selfless and selfish goals. USAID has stated, ‘US foreign assistance has always had the  twofold purpose of furthering America’s foreign policy interests in expanding democracy and free markets while  improving the lives of the citizens of the developing world.’ o This is demonstrated in the fact that Iraq and Afghanistan received most of the US aid in 2008/09  • Canada’s aid is disbursed mainly through the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA­1968) o CIDA operates in more than 100 countries –especially the Middle East and Africa (Haiti was big in 08/09) • France’s aid to mainly former African colonies is administered by the French Development Agency (1941) • British aid is administered by the Department for International Development (DFID), headed by a cabinet minister • It is difficult to measure and rank the overall performance of bilateral aid agencies • The Center for Global Development annually assesses and ranks 22 donor countries’ commitment to development in a  number of areas, including the quantity and quality of foreign aid Aid Recipients • The OECD’s DAC keeps a list of countries that qualify as recipients of ODA • Assistance to countries not in the list does not count as ODA • Some countries can ‘graduate’ if they reach a higher income level • Overall, sub­Saharan Africa receives more foreign aid than any other region, followed by the Middle East and North  Africa. Latin America ranks at the bottom of the list o In 2008 Sub­Saharan Africa received 40% of the DAC aid  • The increase of aid seen since 2000 is usually from debt relief and contributions to Afghanistan and Iraq, not actual  sustainable development  • The top recipients of foreign aid often vary from year to year, depending more on international politics than on other  reasons o For example, spending in the Middle East has increased to reflect US security interests and Ethiopian  spending is because it’s seen as an “anchor country” in fighting terrorism for the US  • Top recipients of aid are not necessarily the most dependent on aid (Middle East has oil money) • Different countries receive aid from different donors and for different purposes o Haiti received most money from North­West Hemisphere before and after the earthquake  Current Trends and Controversies • Donors are reducing or eliminating tied aid • Bilateral aid is now more in the form of grants than loans o In 07/08 only 3.6% of aid was in the form of loans  • Multilateral aid is still mainly in the form of loans
More Less

Related notes for POLS 2080

Log In


OR

Join OneClass

Access over 10 million pages of study
documents for 1.3 million courses.

Sign up

Join to view


OR

By registering, I agree to the Terms and Privacy Policies
Already have an account?
Just a few more details

So we can recommend you notes for your school.

Reset Password

Please enter below the email address you registered with and we will send you a link to reset your password.

Add your courses

Get notes from the top students in your class.


Submit